08/12/2019 12:46 am Welcome to isteroids.com - BLOG

Archive for  September 2007

Friday 28, Sep 2007

MMA rant , steroids?

Posted By

I know many of you know the shameful loss Shogun had to forrest at the last UFC event…

I talked about it here:

http://www.forums.isteroids.com/ufc-pride-fc-muay-thai-boxing-kickboxing/78693-shogun-loses.html

Forrest Griffin Wins by Submission at 4:45 in the 3rd round by rear naked choke.

so do any of you think Shogun used steroids? I don’t think so.  He doesn’t look like he was on steroids or anything related, but maybe, just maybe, he used some EPO or something related.  ….. wait … I’m making excuses for Shogun… isn’t it more likely that he came into the UFC thinking he will dominate the LHW division taking the newbie Forrest with a light touch, coming in with no gameplan (POOR CARDIO) and getting his ass handed to him?
Ladies, we have a winner, SHOGUN lost NOT because of drugs, but because he took UFC too light.

Tuesday 25, Sep 2007

steroid bust – UG labs busted

Posted By

here is a tentative list of busted UG labs (steroids):

rugio
Genescience
Pro Pharm
Bodyz
SIUG
Titan supply
anabolic-superstore
Southern Labs
spyder
AML
Rugio
US Pharma
Tweak
aka pitbull
gym ace aka Supersteroid Board
GALABS
SAMAR
BTLabs
savannah
(promethus)
GasMAN

Monday 24, Sep 2007

Steroids UG labs busted

Posted By

I guess kind of a sad day when the DEA/FDA concentrates on steroid dealers rather then the 200,000 tonnes of coke that come into USA /year , dont forget the Meth problem!!!

the following labs/players have been busted:

Genera Pharms (NOT GENERIC)
Huma Labs
API
The Professor (this could be API)
Vizion Pharms/Phoenix
Samar
SIUG
Osoca
Leo
Samar Labs
Phoenix Pharm, Aka Vision
Powerline
Pharm RXL
Stallion
Dpharm
AP
*********************THE NEWS

An international investigation code-named Operation Raw Deal that culminated in the last four days could produce the next steroids scandal in sports – and perhaps the biggest yet.

The undercover operation led by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration resulted in the seizure of massive amounts of anabolic steroids from an illegal, underground network and the ability to identify hundreds of thousands of people who received steroids and other substances used by some athletes as performance-enhancing drugs, a DEA spokesman told Yahoo! Sports on Sunday.

Most of the raids took place in the United States, and the DEA called the steroids crackdown the largest in U.S. history. DEA offices in New York and San Diego provided lead guidance during an investigation that resulted in 124 arrests and seizures at 56 labs across the country. Investigators also seized 71 weapons, 27 pill presses, 25 vehicles and three boats, but the coveted item was illegal drugs, and the DEA said it intercepted a staggering quantity.

Also, federal officials are creating a database of names of the people who received steroids, human growth hormone (HGH) and other drugs banned by most sports leagues and athletic associations, DEA spokesman Rusty Payne said.

OPERATION RAW DEAL

The Drug Enforcement Administration led a massive, undercover operation that targeted the illegal importation and distribution of steroids, human growth hormone and other medications. A primary source of the illicit drugs was coming from Chinese manufacturers.

Countries involved in the operation:

United States
(26 states)
China
Mexico
Canada
Belgium

Australia
Germany
Denmark
Sweden
Thailand

“I have no information about any athletes yet,” Payne said when asked about the names in the database and others implicated in the case. But he acknowledged the possibility of athletes being linked to the investigation that focused largely on steroids, HGH and other drugs being manufactured by Chinese companies and flooding the U.S. market.

“Of course, performance-enhancing drugs are an issue right now,” Payne told Yahoo! Sports during a telephone interview. “They’re in the news, and they’re in the news because there have been athletes that have been tied to them. We know that’s what this story is.”

Steroids, HGH and other drugs seized in the raids promote muscle growth and speed recovery from injury, and athletes have used them despite the risk of suspensions and permanent bans from sport.

Whether Major League Baseball, the NFL and other sports bodies can gain access to the database and search for athletes who received substances banned by the respective sports organizations will be up to top officials at the Justice Department and DEA, according to Payne.

“Anything is possible,” he said.

Typically, DEA investigations focus on drug suppliers and dealers. But now that the DEA has the ability to identify the largest numbers of people who received illegal shipments of drugs during Operation Raw Deal, Payne said, “If you are one of those people, you could get a knock at your door.”

U.S. officials enlisted the help of China and eight other countries in an investigation that targeted more than 35 Chinese companies that produce raw materials used to make steroids and HGH, and in some cases finished product, sold illegally on the global underground network, Payne said.

China has emerged as the leading supplier of illicit steroids and HGH since the DEA began targeting Mexico suppliers two years ago. U.S. authorities said the operation that shut down steroids manufacturers in Mexico temporarily cut into the supply in the United States, but Chinese suppliers stepped in.

Last week, Yahoo! Sports obtained documents that showed HGH imported from China was seized in the Signature Pharmacy scandal. High-profile athletes linked to that investigation, launched by the district attorney in Albany County, N.Y., include baseball players Rick Ankiel, Gary Matthews Jr., Troy Glaus and Jay Gibbons; NFL safety Rodney Harrison; boxer Evander Holyfield; and a dozen pro wrestlers.

A steroid lab seized on Long Island, N.Y., as part of Operation Raw Deal.

(Photo courtesy DEA)

The role of Chinese companies in supplying steroids to the underground market figures to be sensitive for China considering the country will play host to the 2008 Olympics in Beijing in August. But the investigation could prove even more damaging to the world of sports.

Major League Baseball has scrambled to control recent news leaks of players connected to the Signature scandal. Last week, an arbitration panel upheld the results that showed American cyclist Floyd Landis used synthetic testosterone during his riveting comeback victory in the 2006 Tour de France. And for months, during his successful quest to overtake Hank Aaron as baseball’s all-time home run king, Barry Bonds reignited controversy from a steroids scandal that stemmed from a 2003 raid of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO) that ensnared Bonds and several other well-known athletes.

On Monday, the sports world will learn of the latest potential bombshell. Officials are scheduled to announce details of Operation Raw Deal during news conferences in New York and San Diego.

Investigators hauled in countless bags and boxes loaded with steroids that have a street value potentially exceeding $50 million, Payne said. The stockpile included 11.4 million doses of steroids, which based on the 0.5 milliliter per dose used by the DEA for calculations, amounts to about 570,000 vials that each hold 10 milliliters.

PRIMARY DRUGS SEIZED

• Anabolic steroids
• Human growth hormone
• Human chorionic gonadotropin: used to stimulate natural production of testosterone
• Insulin growth factor 1: A protein that enhances muscle growth

Payne said he had no figures for the amount of HGH and other drugs seized in an operation that involved the Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, the FBI, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. National Drug Intelligence Center.

“These buyers are solely motivated by a desire to gain an unfair competitive advantage by using illegal performance-enhancing substances,” said Terry Vermillion, Director of the FDA Office of Criminal Investigations, in a statement provided to Yahoo! Sports.

But Payne said rather than catching athletes who use banned drugs, the objective was to stanch the flow of illegal steroids and other drugs into the U.S. Most of the drugs seized in the investigation were cooked up “in filthy conditions with no regard to safety,” according to the DEA.

The Internet has emerged as a popular source for those seeking performance-enhancing drugs without the required prescription, prompting Operation Raw Deal to employ a four-pronged strategy. The investigation targeted U.S.-based websites that distribute materials such as conversion kits necessary to turn raw steroid powders into finished product; Internet body building discussion boards that teach individuals how to use, locate, and discreetly purchase steroids; raw material manufacturers and suppliers in China and other countries; and underground steroids labs in the United States, Canada and Mexico.

DEA agents and local police make an arrest in Nassau County in Operation Raw Deal.

(Photo courtesy DEA)

Other countries involved in the coordinated international crackdown included Belgium, Australia, Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Thailand.

“Operation Raw Deal uncovered a clandestine web of international drug dealers who lurk on the Internet for young adults craving the artificial advantage of anabolic steroids,” Karen P. Tandy, the DEA administrator, said in a statement.

In addition to steroids and HGH, the operation targeted Insulin Growth Factor and underground trafficking of ancillary and counterfeit medications. Other drugs seized included cocaine, marijuana, Ecstasy, painkillers, anti-anxiety medications and Viagra.

The DEA lauded Chinese officials for their participation in the effort, but whether China disciplines the manufacturers or discloses information remains to be seen. U.S. officials provided Chinese authorities with information packets about more than 35 Chinese companies that allegedly supplied raw materials for steroids, HGH and other performance-enhancing drugs and are involved in the illicit underground trade around the world. But U.S. officials will withhold the names of those companies in deference to China.

DEA officials said they launched the operation in large part because of health risks in taking drugs that often are mislabeled. The potential side effects include strokes, liver damage and heart disease, experts say.

Though the impact of Operation Raw Deal on sports remains uncertain, the DEA’s work is not done when it comes to a crackdown on the illegal trafficking of steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs, Payne said.

“This is not a case with a beginning and an end,” he said. “I like to look at it more as an initiative.

“This is a huge initiative.”

Friday 21, Sep 2007

Steroids UG lab busted

Posted By

it looks like shit has hit the fan with UG labs

this is the biggest concern:

“In the e-mail correspondence, beginning at least as early April 2006, Scarpa negotiated the purchase of the steroid powders, authorities said.” 

how did they get his email? I’m assuming this is a powders set up of a sort?
*********************************************

Federal agents descended on a home on a quiet, residential street in the borough Thursday morning to break up a steroid-manufacturing operation, seizing 40,000 doses of the substance, guns and $56,000 in cash, authorities said.

Alfred Scarpa, 34, of 16 Rhode St., an electrician with two prior drug convictions in New Jersey, was arrested and charged with manufacturing and distributing steroids. The offense carries a maximum prison term of five years and a fine of as much as $250,000.

Scarpa made an initial appearance before Magistrate Judge Esther Salas in U.S. District Court, Newark, and was ordered detained pending a detention hearing Tuesday. His attorney, Thomas Moran of Paramus, did not return calls seeking comment.

A detention hearing determines whether a defendant is a flight risk or dangerous to the community. Scarpa is being held at Passaic County Jail in Paterson.

Rhode Street is a quiet neighborhood of split-level homes.

At about 5 p.m. Tuesday, agents were on the property bagging seized materials. Neighbors, who declined to be named, said Scarpa moved in a few years ago and lived there with his wife and young child. The family kept to themselves, those neighbors said.

Agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration, the FBI and the Food and Drug Administration were involved in the raid, authorities said.

The drugs were allegedly manufactured in Scarpa’s basement, where federal agents discovered about 10,000 steroid tablets, authorities said.

According to a criminal complaint, they also found the hardware of a steroid factory: several large hand pumps, which were affixed to large brown glass bottles, and a centrifuge in the garage.

Liquid testosterone and 1.5 kilograms of raw steroid powders were among the material seized. Those raw steroid products were converted into ingestible steroids through the manufacturing process using oils and chemicals, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Kirsch.

The products seized amounted to more than 40,000 doses of anabolic steroids, he said.

“This was a substantial, active operation,” Kirsch said of the factory. “It was inconspicuous, plain view in an open area of the basement.”

Kirsch called the investigation “active and ongoing” but declined to elaborate.

Agents also uncovered two semiautomatic handguns, a .40-caliber Springfield pistol and a .40-caliber Glock pistol, Kirsch said.

Scarpa also faces the possibility of federal weapons charges for possession of the firearms as a felon, Kirsch said.

Credit-card records showed Scarpa bought items from companies that sell laboratory supplies such as filtration systems, steroid-conversion kits and other devices used to make steroid pills, authorities said.

In the e-mail correspondence, beginning at least as early April 2006, Scarpa negotiated the purchase of the steroid powders, authorities said.

Agents obtained records showing transactions in which Scarpa wired money through Western Union to suppliers of anabolic steroid products, according to a criminal complaint. In 2000, Scarpa was convicted of a third-degree drug-manufacturing charge in Monmouth County. He received three years’ probation and a $2,000 fine, according to criminal records. Details of another conviction in Union County were not available Thursday night.

Tuesday 18, Sep 2007

HGH bust, no steroids!

Posted By

This story is interesting since it’s an HGH bust not a steroid bust (so to speak).  I guess money CAN buy anything? eh… easy to go after legal companies with doctors, since you can get them to fess up/pay up easily.  Not like crack dealers and meth dealers from Mexico!

Buy steroids ? NO! that’s a bad drug, 20 years in jail, sell steroids = same.

But sell HGH no problem 10,500,000$ USD as a fine and you can go free

such BS talk and double standard

A company that distributed human growth hormone to “well known athletes and entertainers” has agreed to pay a $10.5 million penalty and cooperate with ongoing law enforcement investigations, federal prosecutors said Tuesday.
ADVERTISEMENT

Under the terms of the agreement, Specialty Distribution Services Inc., a subsidiary of Express Scripts Inc., will not face prosecution for three years if it fully complies with terms of the agreement.

Steve Littlejohn, a spokesman for St. Louis-based Express Scripts, said the company fully cooperated in the federal investigation and has already implemented procedures to prevent the illegal distribution of human growth hormone.

“Express Scripts does not condone the use of human growth hormone for anti-aging, cosmetic or performance enhancement purposes,” the company said in a news release.

Specialty Distribution Services “knowingly distributed human growth hormone to certain well known athletes and entertainers, including a well known athlete in Massachusetts, knowing that their intended use was athletic performance enhancement, cosmetic or anti-aging,” in violation of federal law, the U.S. attorney’s office said in a news release.

Prosecutors did not mention any names of those believed to have bought HGH from the firm.

The drug in question was approved by the Food and Drug Administration only for specific purposes, including treatment of children with growth failure due to inadequate growth hormones, prosecutors said.

“The public should also realize that human growth hormone has not been shown to be safe and effective for athletic, cosmetic or anti-aging uses, and it must not be promoted or distributed for such uses,” U.S. Attorney Michael Sullivan said in a statement.

The company illegally shipped the drugs five times between October 2000 and December 2005, according to court documents prosecutors filed with the agreement.

Human growth hormone was sent to a “well known professional athlete in Massachusetts” in January 2002 and again in October 2003 following a doctor’s request, the documents said.

Drugs were sent to an entertainer in March 2002 at the request of a doctor who said he was filling the prescription at the patient’s request and that the drugs were “not medically necessary,” according to the documents. The doctor identified his practice as an “anti-aging clinic.”

The company shipped the drugs to a 6-foot-5, 276-pound “entertainer/athlete” in January 2003 after a doctor said it was “medically necessary,” even though the dosage was typically used for performance enhancement, the documents said.

Specialty Distribution Services had pharmacists and other employees who should have recognized the prescriptions as illegitimate, prosecutors said. Under the agreement, it will better train employees to recognize fake prescriptions.

Human growth hormone is produced naturally by the body throughout life, but can cause complications when taken in excessive amounts, said Dr. Linn Goldberg, professor of medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland.

“When you are a fully grown adult who takes HGH in excess, it thickens your bones and skin, puts you at risk for diabetes and other conditions, and causes fluid retention, joint pain and nerve damage,” he said.

Goldberg said he is not surprised that entertainers and athletes are using it, because it can cost $100 per day. Prosecutors said HGH treatment can cost up to $20,000 per year.

“Athletes are looking for the fountain of youth, and the fountain of youth is not to be found in a bottle,” he said.

Saturday 15, Sep 2007

Do you want to buy steroids ? and WWE wrestlers on steroids

Posted By

This blog is kind of 2 fold, we will talk about buying steroids from a reputable online pharmacy and discuss WWE wrestlers. I think that you should only buy steroids if the source is reputable, so check out http://www.steroids-pharmacy.com – Buy Steroids for your steroids supplies.

Now that out of the way, I want to talk about lex luger, he was a WWE wrestler, he talks heavily in this article about his interest in wrestling but about vince mcmahon making people take steroids.  Get big, stay big, earn cash…not a bad motto, gotta make money drugs or not.

“If you snort it, spray it, shoot it, inject it, I did it, buddy. Or I was around it. That was my life. Alcohol? I abused it all, buddy. I took a lot of pills. I was a pill popper.”
– Lex Luger, aka “The Total Package”

KENNESAW, Ga. — Just before high noon, sun scorching down so intensely that it softens the asphalt, a sweet, white and black ’66 Caddy Sedan de Ville rolls up to within a few yards of the Golden Corral, a buffet joint. Out steps an old egotistical, narcissistic heel clad in khaki pants, a plaid cotton shirt and sandals.

In a matter of moments, Lex Luger abruptly breaks into wrestling character, a cocksure grin on his tanned face. He tilts his head and rolls his eyes up to the blue heavens. He pushes up his right sleeve to flex his ripped, ham-bone-sized bicep.

Then, just as suddenly, the shtick ends. With metal cane in hand, Luger hobbles off to lunch.

For the next couple hours, between trips to the chow line and chats with the folks who wander by his table, the 49-year-old Luger spins his horror stories about Lex as a younger man. That Lex dabbled in so many prescription narcotics, recreational drugs, cocktails and steroids, Luger says, that it’s a wonder he hasn’t joined the growing list of dead-before-their-time pro wrestlers, which unofficially numbers more than 100 over the past decade.

In a quiet moment he recalls sitting helpless in the wee hours as his girlfriend, wrestling personality Miss Elizabeth, died four years ago in the townhouse they shared. The cause, according to the coroner’s report, was “acute toxicity” brought on by a smorgasbord of prescription painkillers and vodka.

“I take a lot of responsibility for that — my influence in her life,” he says. “Her little heart and body couldn’t take what I was doing.”

Later on the day Miss Elizabeth died, police found more than 1,000 illegal pills during a search of their suburban Atlanta townhouse. Eventually, Luger was charged with 13 counts of felony drug possession, for which he received probation as a first offender. He later went to jail for a parole violation in 2006, which is when he came across prison chaplain Steve Baskin, whom he credits with helping turn his life around.

The new Lex, a born-again Christian, eagerly shares what he calls “confessions of a drug abuser.” He is down-to-earth and contrite, even as he occasionally reverts to the larger-than-life character who won multiple championship belts and was one of professional wrestling’s headliners in his heyday. He rails now against the dangers of drug abuse — the pill-popping, the steroids, the recreational substances.

Mostly, he does it by urging the abusers to come clean and to get clean. And where better to start than by making an example of himself and his hellish skid from fame and fortune, which saw him go from a $1 million-a-year wrestling gig to temporary residence in a spare bedroom of his minister’s apartment.

“Wow, I believe I was so close to dying so many times from overdoses,” says Luger, who claims his lone physical ailment at the moment is a broken-down hip due for surgery sometime this fall. ‘One heart beat away,’ I tell people in my faith-based speaking. That, I believe, is why God put me in a role to shed light on the situation in our culture and in our sports. Our sports are affecting our culture.

“It’s the ends justifies the means in sports. We are taught that since we were little. The old, ‘Do whatever you got to do to win, to be the best. Step over, step on and step through.’ So that is how all this performance-enhancing drugs got into our culture. And that leads to guys wanting to take shortcuts. And then, cheat until you get caught, and then lie.”

Luger can trace his own introduction to steroids to a long-ago football career. He played in college as an offensive guard at Penn State and, later, at the University of Miami. In the early 1980s, he had stints in three different pro leagues — the Canadian Football League, National Football League and the now-defunct United States Football League.

In 1979, Luger played for Miami, which featured future All-Pro quarterback Jim Kelly and current University of Georgia coach Mark Richt, until he was booted off the team for an incident that wasn’t drug-related. When he left the Hurricanes, he moved less than an hour up Florida’s Sun Coast to Fort Lauderdale, where he worked as a bouncer at a popular night spot until the Montreal Alouettes of the CFL called with a tryout offer.

“I wanted to look good on the beach, so I had slimmed down to about 235,” says Luger, who was born Larry Pfohl in Buffalo, N.Y. “Now here it’s February and camp starts in May. And I was an offensive guard. Back then, they were quick, pulling guards — not 300-pound monsters. But I needed to be at least like 255.

“So I had to gain weight quick — the unethical, cheating shortcut. Guy in the gym said, ‘Buddy, these little blue pills are called Dianabol.’ And I took four a day, five milligrams apiece. You get on these steroids and you train better, eat more. And you retain water from them. So I gained 15 pounds in about two months. I jumped on it and it worked.

“And it is the same old thing: Once you do something one time, it leads to another. And then I started in the offseason, where I would do one cycle for 12 weeks. A friend of mine was an exercise physiologist. She monitored my blood [levels]. I never took it in-season. I’d just take it in the offseason to build as much strength as I could.”

Dianabol is a powerful anabolic steroid.

In 1985, after the demise of the USFL, Luger retired his football pads and took his then-chiseled 6-foot-4, 270-pound physique to the pro wrestling scene, which was evolving into something of a beauty pageant for guys in spandex tights. He learned the ropes kicking around a regional circuit in Florida. Later in his two-decade career, Luger became a marquee character, and shared headliner status with the likes of Sting (“One of the few that stuck by me when my life was a wreck”), Ric Flair and “Macho Man” Randy Savage (Miss Elizabeth’s ex-husband).

He often played the role of the self-centered bad guy, posing in front of full-length mirrors before his matches. His chemically enhanced physique was part of his costume.

“I was on display year round with my shirt off,” he says. “So what happens in wrestling is a lot of the guys stay on [steroids]. I never stayed on them year-round. I would go on them for 12 weeks, off them for 12.

“I did testosterone and Deca [Durabolin]. It wasn’t classified. It wasn’t against the law.”

But in the 1990s, the law and the climate about steroids both changed. Vince McMahon Jr., overseer of the World Wrestling Entertainment enterprise, faced federal steroid distribution charges, a rap he beat. McMahon and others also began drug-testing their in-the-ring performers, although Luger says the wrestlers had little trouble getting around the pee-in-the-bottle routine.

The irony is that the sport continued to sell massive, cartoon-like superheroes even during the public steroid fuss. That pitch hasn’t changed much. Nor, presumably, has the doping regimens that help build at least some of those ripped, cut physiques.

“Vince [McMahon] sells bigger-than-life,” Luger says. “And bigger-than-life, what does that mean? A lot of chemically enhanced heroes and villains — guys my height and size or bigger. You can’t see that on the street every day. You have to buy a ticket to see that. So he sells basically the freaks. The modern-era giants. The [Hulk] Hogans, too. I don’t mean that disrespectfully. That is meant as a compliment in today’s lingo. They are so out of the ordinary.”

The not-so-veiled message, according to Luger: To pull down oodles of cash, get big. Get bigger. And stay big.

And finding drugs to fuel the growth machine never proved to be a problem, Luger says. For him, it was as simple as an online purchase, or hustling up a black-market source.

The new Lex Luger won’t name names, but he talks about a place in Atlanta where he could pick up a three-month supply of human growth hormone and testosterone, his favorite muscle-builder. He says such sources dot the landscape from Albany to San Francisco. He talks about a man in California who is currently supplying the drugs to hundreds of wrestlers and other pro athletes.

When the cops searched Luger’s condominium on the day Miss Elizabeth died back in 2003, they found a bag he’d never bothered unpacking. Luger claims his ex-wife had sent it over from his former house in a gated, country club community. According to the police report, it contained an assortment of prescription painkillers, plus a bountiful selection of performance-enhancing substances that ranged from six boxes of human growth hormone to 88 bottles of various anabolic steroids.

“I didn’t know I had it, and I would never have kept that stuff in my house,” Luger says. “I would have had a friend keep it for me. Athletes won’t keep it in their house. They’ll go over to their friends’ house and get their shots and stuff.”

Along the way through their careers, he says, athletes sometimes latch on to a friendly doctor or two who is willing to help, someone they can rely on to write a prescription for a steroid or a painkiller.

From 2004 until this July, Luger says he was obtaining prescriptions for pain medicine, specifically the narcotic hydrocodone, from Dr. Phil Astin III, the 52-year-old Carrollton, Ga., doctor currently under federal indictment for overprescribing medications. Astin treated several pro wrestlers, including Chris Benoit, who committed suicide in June after killing his wife and young son.

Luger, however, staunchly defends Astin. He says a gym friend recommended Astin to him, and that the doctor was never a source of steroids.

“I was under pain-management therapy or hydrocodone, just legal amounts,” Luger says. “I need to have hip surgery that I’ve been putting off. I do a little hydrocodone and some Advil and Aleve, buddy. That is all I take. That’s why I was seeing him — a little bit of pain management.”

Painkillers such as hydrocodone, along with other anti-anxiety and mood-altering drugs, appear to be at least as significant a factor as steroids in wrestling’s high mortality rate, though. The fruits of the performance-enhancing drugs are as obvious as the sports’ neatly scripted matches. Unseen, at least by the public, are the ravages — sometimes leading to death — brought on by years of dependency on prescription medications, which are often combined with a steady diet of booze and steroids.

Many pro wrestlers, say Luger and others who’ve competed in the sport, initially turn to painkillers to cope with the nightly rigors and nagging injuries of the circuit. In some cases, a dependency on the narcotics develops.

Luger lived that lifestyle while, by his count, he performed 300 days a year. He’d hustle out of an arena after a show, pumped on adrenaline, and then party into the wee hours and catch a 6:30 flight in the morning. Some nights, his head never hit the pillow. He’d roll into the next town, catch a meal, grab some caffeine or ephedrine to keep going, work out in a gym, do another show and start the cycle all over.

“With my generation, there was no accountability,” he says. “We left the building at 11 o’clock, and you lived dual lives on the road. We were like a big dysfunctional family. We fed off each other. And then we go home and sober up. But unfortunately, drugs are drugs. And the guys let that spill over into their home lives. And if the families didn’t get intervention and stuff, a lot of us died.

“I was a heartbeat away. I almost overdosed probably dozens of times. I had a really fast metabolism. Part of why Lex stayed so lean wasn’t just drugs. God blessed me with a very fast metabolism. I metabolized drugs quickly. That is not good, but it saved my life a bunch of times. I went in deep a bunch of times with pills and alcohol. I was a pill-popper. And I abused alcohol toward the end, real bad. And I got caught with steroids in my house. I am a convicted felon. I deserved it. And I take accountability for that.

“I am trying to help others avoid what happened in my life, and my family and friends that I devastated. I dishonored my profession. I dishonored my community, all because I couldn’t control myself and got this sick other lifestyle and drug abuse. I want to help our young kids stay away from that.”

As he heads back to his car, the long lunch finished, Luger says the classic Caddy in which he arrived was a gift from his father last year. His dad tinkers with cars, and restored it a long time ago, painting it in the familiar colors of his son’s wrestling garb: white boots with black tights and knee pads.

But today’s Lex Luger says the younger Lex, the one who was lucky to survive those high-life years on the circuit, went almost 30 years between visits back to his father and the family home in western New York.

Wednesday 12, Sep 2007

Catonsville man, 48, sentenced for steroids

Posted By

Now I’m not the first to point fingers, but don’t you find it odd that he only got 6mo home detention and 100 hours of community service? I wonder how many ppl. he rolled on

A Catonsville man was sentenced to six months’ home detention and ordered to perform 100 hours of community service for distributing vials and tablets of anabolic steroids over the Internet, according to the U.S. attorney’s office in Baltimore.

Michael Schlanger, 48, a former personal trainer for Bally’s Total Fitness in Glen Burnie, was arrested last year after federal authorities said they intercepted a package of steroids at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York.

Prosecutors said Schlanger imported the drugs from foreign sources and had them sent to rented mailboxes reserved in phony names.

Authorities said agents set up a controlled delivery to a UPS store in Severna Park and later found 40,000 vials and tablets of the muscle enhancers in a storage locker rented to Schlanger.

Schlanger pleaded guilty in June to charges of conspiring to distribute the drug.

Monday 10, Sep 2007

Gym operators accused of selling steroids

Posted By

Another story of guys being just too open with steroid sales , when will people learn that steroids are not a joke?

Police arrested more than 60 people – including a former NYPD officer and a professional boxer – in a sweeping steroid sting at two Queens gyms that acted like “drug supermarkets,” officials said Friday.

Gym owners and trainers allegedly sold human growth hormone and other steroids brazenly at the front desk, on the gym floor and in locker rooms, said Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly.

The sting also netted two guns, more than an ounce of cocaine, numerous prescription pain killers and more nearly $40,000 in cash, Kelly said.

The Powerhouse Gym in Bayside and Envy Us in College Point allegedly made as much as $50,000 a week from the illegal drug sales.

“These gyms had in reality been turned into drug supermarkets,” said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown.

Ninth-ranked junior lightweight boxer Cindy “Checkmate” Serrano, 25, was one of those arrested. She was charged with criminal sale of a controlled substance, but there was no evidence that she was using the steroids, Kelly said.

Former New York Police Department officer, Benigno Mercado, was also charged with selling drugs. Mercado was fired last year when he was caught with stolen license plates on his car while on suspension for another matter, Kelly said.

 

Monday 10, Sep 2007

Gym operators accused of selling steroids

Posted By

Another story of guys being just too open with steroid sales , when will people learn that steroids are not a joke?

Police arrested more than 60 people – including a former NYPD officer and a professional boxer – in a sweeping steroid sting at two Queens gyms that acted like “drug supermarkets,” officials said Friday.

Gym owners and trainers allegedly sold human growth hormone and other steroids brazenly at the front desk, on the gym floor and in locker rooms, said Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly.

The sting also netted two guns, more than an ounce of cocaine, numerous prescription pain killers and more nearly $40,000 in cash, Kelly said.

The Powerhouse Gym in Bayside and Envy Us in College Point allegedly made as much as $50,000 a week from the illegal drug sales.

“These gyms had in reality been turned into drug supermarkets,” said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown.

Ninth-ranked junior lightweight boxer Cindy “Checkmate” Serrano, 25, was one of those arrested. She was charged with criminal sale of a controlled substance, but there was no evidence that she was using the steroids, Kelly said.

Former New York Police Department officer, Benigno Mercado, was also charged with selling drugs. Mercado was fired last year when he was caught with stolen license plates on his car while on suspension for another matter, Kelly said.

 

Thursday 06, Sep 2007

Steroids Esters: Much more than just half-life of testosterone…

Posted By

Steroids Esters: Much more than just half-life of testosterone…

By the end of this article, you’re going to know:

• What an steroids ester is and how it works
• Steroids Esters greatly impact much more than just half-life
• Steroids Esters influence the degree of a steroid’s conversion to estrogen
• Anabolic Steroids Esters actually make a given steroid more or less anabolic
• Steroids Esters influence peak plasma levels of a given steroid
• Half-life/Active-life charts are all basically incorrect…

Read the whole article about Steroids Esters and how Anabolic Steroids work on your body…