20/10/2019 7:14 am Welcome to isteroids.com - BLOG

Archive for  January 2010

Sunday 31, Jan 2010

Kidney damage possible with steroid use

Posted By

Kidney damage possible with steroid useAnabolic steroids have always encouraged bodybuilders and other sportsmen to go for them but the use of steroids is not free from side effects. According to a paper presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in San Diego, CA, athletes using steroids may suffer from damage to kidney function.

This previously unrecognized complication may occur when steroids are used on a habitual basis.

This study was conducted in the lab of Dr. Vivette D’Agati, MD at Columbia Univeristy Medical Center. Study co-authors included Glen Markowitz, MD, Joshua Schwimmer, MD, Michael Stokes, MD, Cheryl Kunis, MD, Vivette D’Agati, MD, (Columbia University Medical Center); Alton Farris, MD, and Robert Colvin, MD (Massachusetts General Hospital).

Sunday 31, Jan 2010

Mark McGwire still reluctant to take responsibility

Posted By

Mark McGwire still reluctant to take responsibilityMark McGwire is a broken man these days, living with a conflicted soul. The name and recognition he received while playing baseball have suddenly started eluding him after he confessed using steroids during his illustratious career as a baseball slugger admired for hundreds of home runs.

McGwire insisted that his on-field performance was based on God-given talent and hand-eye coordination and not due to use of steroids.

Whatever may the future holds for this eminent baseball slugger, one thing that cannot be denied is that he has lost the respect that was once unique to him.

Saturday 30, Jan 2010

McGwire evades steroid issue during first appearance with Cardinals

Posted By

McGwire evades steroid issue during first appearance with CardinalsMark McGwire, the idol of many baseball players and newly appointed hitting coach of the Cardinals, recently walked into the winter warm-up to be greeted with a standing ovation and the song “Welcome to the Jungle.”

During his first public appearance since coming clean, McGwire made it sure that he easily evades all questions related to steroid use thrown at him. He said that he came clean and spoke honestly on Monday night on TV with Bob Costas and people should move on.

It is believed that the steroid confession would relieve McGwire by lifting a huge weight off his still-large shoulders.

Saturday 30, Jan 2010

McGwire’s motive disputed by Steroid Supplier

Posted By

McGwire's motive disputed by Steroid SupplierA convicted drug dealer, Curtis Wenzlaff, who used to supply steroids to Mark McGwire as per his claims said that he believes that the baseball slugger was not completely truthful about the reasons behind him using performance-enhancing drugs in his interview with Bob Costas on the MLB Network on Jan. 11, 2010.

Wenzlaff said while speaking with ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” on Thursday that the goal of McGwire was to use steroids for getting “”bigger, faster, stronger” for improving his on-field performance.

This revelation is bound to dent image of the baseball slugger once more for sure.

Friday 29, Jan 2010

Diabetes-related disease can be slowed down with steroid injections

Posted By

Diabetes-related disease can be slowed down with steroid injectionsInjecting triamcinolone, the corticosteroid, directly into the eye can possibly slow down the progression of diabetic retinopathy, which is a complication of diabetes that may result in vision loss and blindness.

This finding was presented in a report in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is a complication that occurs when new blood vessels form on the optic disc or another retina component.

The study was conducted by Neil M. Bressler, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network conducted a study involving 840 eyes of 693 participants having macular edema.

Friday 29, Jan 2010

Progesterone optimized for treating brain injury

Posted By

progesterone-optimized-for-treating-brain-injuryResearchers are moving ahead by testing progesterone in the quest to optimizing the effectiveness of the hormone for treating traumatic brain injury.

In this direction, two abstracts summarizing Emory research on the hormone were presented at the 2009 Society for Neuroscience (SFN) meeting in Chicago.

A multisite phase III clinical trial called ProTECT III will be initiated for examining the effectiveness of the hormone in the coming few months. The trial was developed by Donald Stein, PhD, Asa G. Candler Professor of Emergency Medicine at Emory School of Medicine.

It was noted by the authors that a low amount of Vitamin D has the ability to boost progesterone’s ability to guard neurons from excito-toxicity, which is a principal cause of brain injury and cell death.

Friday 29, Jan 2010

Steroid drug addition to MS treatment effective for reducing disease activity

Posted By

Steroid drug addition to MS treatment effective for reducing disease activityThe use of a steroid drug, methylprednisolone, in addition to a multiple sclerosis (MS) drug can prove to be a more effective combination for reducing the volume of disease activity than the use of MS drug alone.

This finding was presented as part of the Late-breaking Science Program at the American Academy of Neurology’s 61st Annual Meeting in Seattle, April 25 – May 2, 2009.

Study author Mads Ravnborg, MD, of the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Research Center at Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark, remarked that the results suggest that both drugs seem to have a synergy when taken as a combination and offer a more beneficial effect on the disease activity.

Friday 29, Jan 2010

Rice growth controlled by antagonistic genes

Posted By

rice-growth-controlled-by-antagonistic-genesAccording to scientists at the Carnegie Institution, a plant steroid is responsible for prompting two genes to battle against each other – one suppressing the other for ensuring that leaves grow normally in rice and the experimental plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which is a relative of mustard.

The results are expected to have critical implications for understanding as to how crop growth and yield can be manipulated. These results appeared in the December 15, 2009, issue of The Plant Cell.

The list of study colleagues were from the following institutions: Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences; Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution; Yonsei University, Korea; RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Japan.

Thursday 28, Jan 2010

Protein behind Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Polyps tracked down

Posted By

chronic-rhinosinusitisAccording to a study by researchers from Johns Hopkins, a protein that was known to stimulate growth of blood vessel has now been found to be behind the cell overgrowth in the development of polyps characterizing one of the most severe forms of sinusitis.

Jean Kim, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor in the Departments of Otolaryngology and Allergy and Clinical Immunology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Allergy and Asthma Center at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, said that the sinusitis is not subtle in its nature.

This finding has given a new target to scientists to develop novel therapies for treating this disease form, which usually resist all present-day treatments.

Thursday 28, Jan 2010

Androgen receptor suppressing protein can improve diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

Posted By

prostate_cancerAccording to researchers from the Medical College of Georgia, a protein that is helpful in regulating expression of androgen receptors may prove to be a new focal point for staging and treating testosterone-fueled prostate cancer.

It was noted that levels of the protein, βarrestin2, were lower in certain prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate cells. It was also noted that the expression of testosterone-fed androgen receptors is higher in such cases.

The findings were reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Online Early Edition.

The study’s corresponding author, Dr. Yehia Daaka, Distinguished Chair in Oncologic Pathology in the MCG School of Medicine, said that an increase in the volume of androgen receptors is considered to be behind prostate cancer progression in men with advanced complication.

Next Page »