07/08/2020 8:48 am Welcome to isteroids.com - BLOG

Archive for  April 2010

Wednesday 28, Apr 2010

Some kids benefit more than others from asthma medication

Posted By

 

some-kids-benefit-more-than-others-from-asthma-medicationGirls and children who are exposed to smoke of tobacco respond specifically well to montelukast (Singulair), as per researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center.

Two biomarkers that can help physicians in predicting even more precisely which patients would benefit from montelukast were also identified by Associate Professor of Pediatrics Nathan Rabinovitch, MD, and his colleagues.

The study was recently published online and appeared in an issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Wednesday 28, Apr 2010

Acupuncture minimizes breast cancer treatment side effects

Posted By

 

acupuncture-minimizes-breast-cancer-treatment-side-effectsWhen compared to conventional drug therapy, acupuncture is equally effective and long-lasting in managing the common debilitating side effects of hot flashes, excessive sweating, and night sweats that are associated with breast cancer treatment as per a study. It was also noted that acupuncture has no treatment side effects.

These findings were part of a first-of-its-kind study presented at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology’s 50th Annual Meeting in Boston.

Eleanor Walker, M.D., lead author of the study and a radiation oncologist at the Henry Ford Hospital Department of Radiation Oncology in Detroit, said that acupuncture is more durable than a drug presently used for treating the vasomotor symptoms.

Tuesday 27, Apr 2010

Ulcerative colitis patients may find relief with new, promising treatment

Posted By

 

ulcerative-colitis-patients-may-find-relief-with-new-promising-treatmentA promising new therapy pioneered by University of Kentucky gastroenterology specialists may provide significant relief to people with the chronic disease ulcerative colitis that can limit life to few social functions and trips away from home.

Ulcerative colitis brings inflammation and ulcers in the colon and leads to abdominal pain and such frequent trips to the toilet. Some of the presently available treatment options for this complication are steroids, surgery, or anti-inflammatory drugs.

Willem J.S. deVilliers, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the UK Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, said that this is a very welcome addition to the treatment options.

Tuesday 27, Apr 2010

Gene therapy can enhance learning and memory in animals

Posted By

Gene therapy can enhance learning and memory in animalsA gene has been designed by neuroscientists at the Stanford University that can enhance learning and memory abilities in animals under stress. The Stanford team remarked that experimental technique could one day lead to new forms of gene therapy possible of reducing the severe neurological side effects of steroids that are prescribed to millions of patients with arthritis, asthma and other illnesses.

Robert Sapolsky, co-author of the study and neuroendocrinologist, said steroids can mess up the brain part involved in cognition and judgment.

Sapolsky, the John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor of Biological Sciences and a professor of neurology and neurological sciences at Stanford, has conducted numerous experiments on the damaging physiological effects of stress and has written extensively on the subject.

Tuesday 27, Apr 2010

Steroid use by female teen not just limited to athletes

Posted By

Steroid use by female teen not just limited to athletesUse of steroids by teen girls is not merely limited to athletes and usually goes hand-in-hand with other unhealthy practices, such as diet pills and smoking. This finding was disclosed by researchers from the Division of Health Promotion & Sports Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University.

The study results were published in an issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, a JAMA/Archives journal.

Elliot explained that teen girls using anabolic steroids are at a higher risk of using other unhealthy substances such as alcohol, cigarette, and cocaine than their counterparts who do not use steroids.

Tuesday 27, Apr 2010

Steroid hormone signaling in plants untangled

Posted By

 

steroid-hormone-signaling-in-plants-untangledPlants tend to “pump” up like major league baseball players do on steroids when they are given extra shots of brassinolide, the plant steroid. Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies while tracing signal of brassinolide deep into the cell’s nucleus unraveled how the growth-boosting hormone performs this job at the molecular level.

The Salk researchers, led by Joanne Chory, a professor in the Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, published their findings in the journal Nature.

Chory remarked that this study clarifies what happens in the downstream in the nucleus when brassinolide signals a plant cell to grow.

Monday 26, Apr 2010

Autoimmune diseases of the body can be treated with eye protein

Posted By

Autoimmune diseases of the body can be treated with eye proteinA factor (protein) in the human eye may prove effective to prevent and halt autoimmune eye disease in animal models besides useful for preventing and treating other autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis and diabetes, as per scientists at the Schepens Eye Research Institute.

The factor alpha-MSH, when harnessed and used as a therapeutic drug, was demonstrated by the authors in a study in the November issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology to be useful in successfully preventing the onset of and stop progression of uveitis.

The Schepens Eye Research Institute team was awarded a $330, 000 grant by the Wadsworth Foundation to explore new therapies for multiple sclerosis on the virtue of this study and the basic research leading up to it.

Monday 26, Apr 2010

Cancer and infertility can be prevented with new vasculitis therapy

Posted By

Cancer and infertility can be prevented with new vasculitis therapyA drug previously approved for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s B cell lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis, Rituxan, was recently identified by researchers as a useful option to treat severe ANCA-associated vasculitis as effectively as cyclophosphamide, the present standard therapy.

The news was presented on October 18 at the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in Philadelphia.

Robert Spiera, M.D., an associate attending rheumatologist at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, said Rituxan is as effective as cyclophosphamide when it comes to promoting patients to go on remission without leading to infertility or causing secondary cancers.

Monday 26, Apr 2010

Testosterone levels possible of getting elevated with Androstenedione

Posted By

Testosterone levels possible of getting elevated with AndrostenedioneA dietary supplement used by some athletes, Androstenedione, when administered in dosages of 300 milligram (mg) may increase the blood testosterone levels in healthy young men, according to a study. It was also disclosed that both 100 and 300 mg doses of this supplement can also promote estrogen level increases. The study, however, did not examined if androstenedione has long-term side effects or of it can aid muscle mass or strength gains.

The study was led by researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and reported in the Feb. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Joel Finkelstein, MD, of the MGH Endocrine Unit, the report’s senior author, remarked that this is the first of its kind study to disclose that sufficient doses of Androstenedione can increase serum testosterone.

Monday 26, Apr 2010

Old drug identified as prospective preeclampsia cure

Posted By

old-drug-identified-as-prospective-preeclampsia-cureResearchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are presently evaluating if a drug already available to patients suffering from heart diseases could be used for delaying delivery in expectant mothers with severe preeclampsia. If successful, the groundbreaking study will offer hope to hundred of thousands of women experiencing this life-endangering disorder.

Digibind, the drug, has been prescribed for more than twenty years to patients overdosing on a specific heart medication but is not presently approved for treating preeclampsia, which is the most common and dangerous pregnancy complication affecting as many as eight in every hundred pregnant women.

Dr. George Saade, chief of maternal–fetal medicine at UTMB said that this study is important to protect the mother while allowing the baby to grow and develop without delivering early.

« Previous PageNext Page »