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Archive for  September 2012

Sunday 30, Sep 2012

Arbitrator Upholds Sanction for U.S. Track & Field Athlete

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Arbitrator Upholds Sanction for U.S. Track & Field Athlete

An independent American Arbitration Association (AAA) arbitrator has issued a decision upholding the suspension for two years of Mark Jelks, of Kansas City, Kan., an athlete in the sport of Track & Field, for committing an anti-doping rule violation, according to an announcement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 28-year-old Jelks is a member of the USADA Registered Testing Pool that consists of a select group of athletes subject to certain whereabouts requirements in order to be located for USADA Out-of-Competition testing. The athlete failed to comply with the whereabouts requirements and, as a result, accrued three Whereabouts Failures within a period of 18 months. The combination of three Whereabouts Failures within an 18-month period constitutes an anti-doping rules violation under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”).

A Whereabouts Failure includes failure to offer required quarterly whereabouts filings (Filing Failure) and failure to be available for testing during a 60-minute window designated by the athlete (Missed Test). Mark Jelks accrued two filing failures and one missed test within a period of 18 months.

Jelks was sanctioned with a two-year period of ineligibility in 2010 after he failed to respond to numerous communications from USADA concerning his violation of anti-doping rules. The athlete contacted USADA in December 2011 and made a request for a reduction in his ineligibility period. The anti-doping agency declined to unilaterally reduce ineligibility period of the athlete but agreed to have the matter heard by an AAA arbitrator because of the unique circumstances of his case. The hearing started on April 18, 2012 and was declared closed on April 30, 2012. A decision was issued by the arbitrator on May 25, 2012 that denied the request made by Jelks for a reduction in his period of ineligibility and the two-year period of ineligibility for Jelks completed on August 22, 2012.

Athletes, including Jelks, are required to complete the Athlete’s Advantage online tutorial of USADA before being enrolled in the USADA registered testing pool that explains to athletes in detail their responsibilities as members of the Pool, including their obligations to comply with the whereabouts requirements. Jelks received a two-year period of ineligibility that began on August 23, 2010, consistent with the code, and the athlete was disqualified from all competitive results achieved on and subsequent to April 18, 2010, the date of his last Whereabouts Failure, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

Born on April 10, 1984, the American track and field athlete specializes in the 100-meter dash and has a personal best of 9.99 seconds for the event and represented the United States at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics. Jelks competed in the 60-meter dash and won the national title at the 2009 USA Indoor Track and Field Championships with a personal record of 6.51 seconds. He broke the 10-second barrier for the first time at the 2008 United States Olympic Trials and started the 2010 indoor season in top form by winning the 60 m in Düsseldorf with a time of 6.56 seconds.

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Saturday 29, Sep 2012

Ethiopian Track & Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Ethiopian Track Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

A suspension of two years has been accepted by Ezkyas Sisay, an Ethiopian athlete in the sport of track & field, for committing an anti-doping rule violation, according to the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) and USADA.

The Ethiopian marathon runner received the doping ban of two years after a positive drug test at the 2011 New York Marathon, the US Anti-Doping Agency announced. In the race, Sisay finished ninth in the race in two hours, 11 minutes and four seconds. The USADA remarked that the marathon runner admitted using the banned substance synthetic erythropoietin (EPO) after testing positive for it. The athlete was also stripped of his victory in last January’s Carlsbad Half-Marathon in California.

The 24-year-old Sisay is a member of IAAF and admitted the use of synthetic erythropoietin (EPO) after he tested positive as a result of a sample collected by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA) on behalf of the IAAF at the New York City Marathon on November 6, 2011. The two-year period of ineligibility of Sisay began on November 6, 2011, the date the doping offense occurred. The athlete has been disqualified from all competitive results achieved on and subsequent to November 6, 2011, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

Erythropoietin use is prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Association of Athletics Federation Anti-Doping Rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”).

USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart appreciated the IAAF for its commitment to the global fight against the use of performance enhancing drugs in sports and added that this is a perfect example of why cooperation between national anti-doping organizations and international federations is essential to protect the rights of clean athletes and preserve the integrity of competition.

Dr. Gabriel Dollé, Director of the IAAF Medical and Anti-Doping Department, said the United States is an important country for the International Association of Athletics Federations not only because of the quality of its national elite athletes but also because it hosts major athletic events besides attracting international athletes from all over the world and therefore it is important for our agency to be able to reply on an innovative and efficient agency like the USASA that is fully committed to eradicate doping on its territory. Dr. Dollé added that this case illustrates the joint efforts made by the USADA and the IAAF towards this common objective.

At the 33rd edition in 2010 America’s Finest City Half Marathon, Ethiopian training partners Ezkyas Sisay and Belaynesh Zemedkun (the women’s record holder with her time of 1:10:28) topped the men’s and women’s fields respectively that attracted an international field of almost 10,000 runners and raised $3.8 million for non-profit organizations. Sisay, placed 11th in Grandma’s full marathon in 2010, would no longer be invited to run Grandma’s Marathon in Duluth after testing positive for drugs. In 2007, Grandma’s Marathon instituted a strict drug policy after the 2006 female champion tested positive for performance enhancing drugs.

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Friday 28, Sep 2012

Franco Pellizotti Wins Italian Road Championships

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Franco Pellizotti Wins Italian Road Championships

@Franco Pellizotti, the Italian cyclist, suspended for two years by the Court of Arbitration for Sport after it upheld an appeal by the UCI and who signed with Androni Giocattoli-Venezuela team, has won the recently concluded Italian road championships.

The cyclist was suspended under the Biological Passport System of the UCI that monitors parameters in the blood profiles of cyclists for identifying the signs of doping and manipulation. The cyclist’s ban was backdated to May 3rd 2010, when he was first removed from competition, meaning that his suspension lasted until May 2nd 2012. After his two-year ban was completed, the cyclist signed with the Androni Giocattoli-Venezuela team.

Franco Pellizotti was provisionally suspended by his Liquigas-Doimo team after the UCI made an announcement that it had detected abnormal values in the profile of Pellizotti’s blood passport. Thereafter, the Italian Olympic Committee’s Anti-doping prosecutor recommended a two-year suspension for Franco Pellizotti for violation of the WADA Anti-doping code. The CAS Panel noted the violation by the cyclist of the anti-doping rules that prohibited the enhancement of oxygen transfer and imposed a ban of two years and asked the cyclist to pay an amount of €115’000 to the UCI as financial sanction.

When the CAS announced its decision, Franco Pellizotti and his team of specialists and lawyers insisted that there is nothing irregular with blood values of the cyclist and claimed that the variations detected by the UCI may have been caused by dehydration. His lawyer Rocco Taminelli and the Liquigas-Doimo team doctor, Roberto Corsetti questioned how experts from the UCI came to the conclusion that Pellizotti should face disciplinary proceeding for breaking anti-doping rules. Both claimed that only two of the 22 values included in the biological passport of the cyclist caused concern and only three of the nine UCI medical experts had considered the values unusual. It was also remarked that the two irregular hemoglobin and reticulocytes values tests were done in November 2008 that was a month after the cyclist ended his season, and then on July 2 last year, just before the start of the Tour de France.

The Italian professional road bicycle racer, currently riding for the Androni Giocattoli-Venezuela team, is best known as a climbing specialist and won Stage 10 in the 2006 Giro d’Italia, Stage 16 in the 2008 Giro d’Italia, and Stage 17 in the 2009 Giro d’Italia.

During the 2009 Tour de France, Pellizotti won the polka dot jersey in Paris as the best climber and was named the Most Combative (Aggressive) Rider on Stages 9 and 17. His name was released by La Gazzetta dello Sport on May 3, 2010 as one of several riders under investigation by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) for “irregular blood values”. After the same was confirmed by the UCI, he was immediately pulled from the squad and replaced with Vincenzo Nibali. The cyclist’s case reached the Court of Arbitration for Sport in March 2011 where he was suspended for two years and all his results from May 17, 2009 were annulled by the CAS that also meant the cyclist lost a stage win and third place overall in the Giro d’Italia and a stage win and overall victory in the mountains and combativity classifications in the Tour de France.


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Thursday 27, Sep 2012

Pietro Caucchioli Banned

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Pietro Caucchioli Banned

Italian professional road racing cyclist, Pietro Caucchioli (born 28 August 1975 in Bovolone, Veneto), was suspended for two years by the National Anti-Doping Tribunal of the Italian Olympic Committee (CONI) for doping from abnormalities found in his biological passport.

The 34-year-old was given a two-year suspension and a fine by the Italian National Olympic Committee (CONI). The cyclist was suspended by his Lampre team it was revealed he was showing abnormal values in the system. The suspension of Caucchioli is retroactive to June 18, 2009, ending June 17, 2011. The cyclist was provisionally suspended since June of 2009 because of abnormal values in his Biological Passport, something that has now been officially deemed a breach of the Anti-Doping Rules.

The cyclist was disqualified of all his results obtained as from 7 May 2009. The UCI examined many blood samples belonging to the cyclist between April 2008 and May 2009 and found the athlete violating the anti-doping regulations prohibiting methods of enhancing oxygen transfer (blood doping). Caucchioli filed a statement of appeal to the Court of Arbitration of Sports on 23 July 2010 for requesting the annulment of the CONI decision that suspended him for a period of two years starting on 18 June 2009. The CAS Panel also evaluated all the objections raised by Pietro Caucchioli concerning possible preanalytical and analytical irregularities that may have been committed by some laboratories and that may, in turn, have affected the reliability of the results.

Pietro Caucchioli (Lampre) and Francesco de Bonis (Diquigiovanni) were the two Italian cyclists who were identified in cycling’s new rigorous anti-doping biological passport program and were suspended by their respective teams. The problems of Caucchioli started when he provided a blood test on the eve of the Tour of Poland in September 2008 before he joined the team. The duo, along with former world road race champion Igor Astarloa and two other Spanish cyclists were identified by the UCI due to irregularities from blood samples on their respective passports. The ICU said, the five had “violated the anti-doping rules on the basis of information from blood profiles on their biological passport.”

Caucchioli was also implicated by Bernhard Kohl in the Austrian case revolving around his ex-manager Stefan Matschiner and the blood bank HumanPlasma. Kohl remarked that Caucchioli made a one-time payment for using the blood centrifuge that was purchased by himself, fellow cyclist Michael Rasmussen, and cross country skiing champion Christian Hoffman.

Kohl was banned for testing positive for EPO CERA and told investigators from Austria that top cyclists, Thomas Dekker and Pietro Caucchioli, had used blood-doping centrifuges acquired by his former manager Stefan Matschiner between 2006 and 2008. Kohl apparently said Matschiner him that cyclists Michael Boogerd, Thomas Dekker, and Pietro Caucchioli had used the machines in exchange for a one-time payment. A two-time Dutch champion, Dekker, and Caucchioli were both kept out of 2009 Tour de France after testing positive for doping while Boogerd retired in October 2007. Matschiner, who has admitted to performing irregular blood transfusions for Kohl, was also the manager of Danish cyclist Michael Rasmussen who got thrown off the race at the 2007 Tour de France following doping allegations.

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Wednesday 26, Sep 2012

Georgian Power lifter Suspended

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Georgian Power lifter Suspended

Georgian Power lifter Shota Omarashvili has been suspended for two years for an Anti-Doping Rule Violation, according to the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).

The power lifter returned an adverse analytical finding for anabolic androgenic steroids in a urine sample provided on 27 August 2012 in an out of competition test prior to the start of the London 2012 Paralympic Games. The substance is included on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) 2012 Prohibited List under the category S1b and endogenous anabolic androgenic steroids when administered exogenously are prohibited under the IPC Anti-Doping Code.

The following endogenous (“endogenous” refers to a substance which is capable of being produced by the body naturally) anabolic androgenic steroids when administered exogenously (“exogenous” refers to a substance which is not ordinarily capable of being produced by the body naturally) are prohibited under the WADA code: androstenediol (androst-5-ene-3β,17β-diol); androstenedione (androst-4-ene-3,17-dione); dihydrotestosterone (17β-hydroxy-5α-androstan-3-one); prasterone (dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA); testosterone and their metabolites and isomers, including but not limited to:5α-androstane-3α,17α-diol; 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol; 5α-androstane-3β,17α-diol; 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol; androst-4-ene-3α,17α-diol; androst-4-ene-3α,17β-diol; androst-4-ene-3β,17α-diol; androst-5-ene-3α,17α-diol; androst-5-ene-3α,17β-diol; androst-5-ene-3β,17α-diol; 4-androstenediol (androst-4-ene-3β,17β-diol); 5-androstenedione (androst-5-ene-3,17-dione); epi-dihydrotestosterone; epitestosterone; 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one; 3β-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one; 7α-hydroxy-DHEA ; 7β-hydroxy-DHEA ; 7-keto-DHEA; 19-norandrosterone; 19-noretiocholanolone.

Omarashvili will serve a two year suspension for the offence beginning on 6 September 2012, the date from which he was notified of his Anti-Doping Rule Violation and all results obtained from 27 August, the date of the test and onwards, will be disqualified with all the resulting consequences including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes. This would include Shota Omarashvili’s result from competing in the men’s 60kg powerlifting event at London 2012 where failed to complete a lift. The power lifter was also handed a financial sanction of 1,500 Euros.

Born on 25 November 1981, Shota Omarashvili was born prematurely with limited use of his legs and could not walk until he was three years old. His father joined the military with the aim of getting better health care for his son and died during the 1992-1993 war in Abkhazia when Shota was nine years old. Omarashvili went through four surgeries and his condition improved in the end but can still walk on his tiptoes. Shota started actively training for Paralympic weightlifting on March 12, 2009.

The IPC, together with the International Federations and the National Paralympic Committees, has established the IPC Anti-Doping Code to prevent doping in sport for Paralympic athletes, in the spirit of fair play that is in conformity with the general principles of the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC).

Meanwhile, Russian powerlifters Nikolay Marfin and Vadim Rakitin tested positive for human growth hormone a week before the Games started. While Marfin was stopped from taking part in the 100-plus kg class, Rakitin competed in the men’s under-90kg class.

Toni Pascual, chair of the International Paralympic Committee‘s anti-doping body, said this case is a world’s first as some of the advanced testing methods were used that were only introduced prior to London 2012 and they can detect misuse of human growth hormone over a span of weeks, compared to previous methods used which only detected use over a shorter time period.


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Tuesday 25, Sep 2012

Rising Star Dean Cadwallader Tests Positive

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Rising Star Dean Cadwallader Tests Positive

The West Australian Football League (WAFL) is reeling with news that East Perth footballer Dean Cadwallader has tested positive to anabolic steroids and is banned for a period of two years. Cadwallader as informed by the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority of a positive result taken from him during the state team program.

Cadwallader returned a positive test for nandrolone, which is prohibited both in- and out-of-competition and listed as an S1 Anabolic Agent on the 2010 World Anti-Doping Code Prohibited List; both the ‘A” and “B” samples of the football player returned positive results to nandrolone, the anabolic steroid. The 19-year-old tested positive to the substance and under Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) regulations for which the prescribed penalty is an automatic suspension of two years.

The 19-year-old from Stirling made his league debut for the Royals in round two in 2010 and played in 11 games before he was dropped for the clash with Claremont on June 26. A speedy midfielder on the radar of a number of AFL clubs, Dean Cadwallader, was stood down by East Perth when the club was notified of the first positive test. The AFL hopeful was not allowed to play competitive football until June 2012 under the ruling. His period of ineligibility was fixed at two years backdated to June 21, 2010.

WAFL tribunal chairman Paul Heaney said Cadwallader admitted that he willingly took the drug to increase his weight after being told by his coach that he need to put on weight if he wants to be eligible for the AFL draft and play league football in WA. The WAFL had conducted the tribunal process in strict accordance with the AFL’s anti-doping code, acting WAFL operations manager Steve Hargrave said and added the West Australian Football League is in close consultation with key partners such as the AFL, DSR, Sports Medicine Australia, and ASADA in our ongoing development of the WAFL drug education program.

Nandrolone is commonly used by professional sportsmen to increase muscle mass and has been used illegally by athletes including Linford Christie and tennis player Petr Korda.

Cadwallader said he would like to acknowledge his actions and expressed regret for the disappointment caused to all. The player rendered an apology to his family, my teammates, the East Perth Football Club and its staff, its members and its supporters and said he has made a big mistake and paid a heavy price for that. Cadwallader expressed hopes that he can soon come back to the game and make a positive contribution. The footballer chose not to inform the club of how and why the banned steroid was taken.

East Perth coach Tony Micale said there was no need for Cadwallader to do anything like that as he had he natural talent to achieve the highest level without using drugs and said he is shocked to learn about the doping incident. Micale added that Dean had just made an error of judgment on this occasion and said he was not aware of other players at the club using drugs or not and declined to comment when asked how long Dean had been taking nandrolone.


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Monday 24, Sep 2012

Perth Football Club Player Banned

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Perth Football Club Player Banned

The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) has acknowledged decision of the West Australian Football League (WAFL) Anti-Doping Tribunal for imposing a ban of two years on Perth Football Club player Joel Fiegert, for the presence of prohibited substances. The WA Football Commission released findings from a WAFL anti-doping tribunal hearing and said the 21-year-old Fiegert tested positive to an illicit drug prohibited under clause 11.1 of the anti-doping code.

The substances D-amphetamine and D-methamphetamine were detected in a sample that was collected by the ASADA in-competition from Mr Fiegert, following a 30 July 2011 match between Perth and South Fremantle at Brownes Stadium, Western Australia. D-amphetamine and D-methamphetamine are classified as stimulants and are prohibited in-competition, under the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Prohibited List.

Fiegert, who played 13 league matches in four seasons at the Demons, said he was clean and vehemently denied producing a positive test or being suspended at the end of last season. The ban imposed on Fiegert by the WAFL tribunal was backdated to the date of his provisional suspension and he would be ineligible to participate as an athlete or support person until 23 August 2013 in any sports that have adopted a World Anti-Doping Agency compliant anti-doping policy.

Perth president Vince Pendal was believed to be devastated by the information, but he would not discuss it and said we are not making any comment until the process has gone through. Perth Football Club chief executive Marty Atkins said the club supported the tough stance against recreational drugs and added that he club would work with the player and his family to give him the chance to a make a return to the club once the ban had been lifted.

The former Perth Demons midfielder has become the fourth WAFL player in two years to be suspended for testing positive to a banned substance after East Perth’s Kane Goodwin, Swan Districts’ Travis Casserly, and fellow Royal Dean Cadwallader. Goodwin tested positive to cocaine and the anabolic agent Clenbuterol and can play again in June next year. Casserly tested positive to the banned stimulant pseudoephedrine in cold tablets that he used during the 2010 grand final and would be eligible to play next season. Since then, he has visited many clubs for warning players of risks caused by drugs. The ban of Cadwallader for using Nandrolone expired in May.

Joel Fiegert is no longer at the Demons and is working in Karratha and said he is not aware of a positive test. When asked why he didn’t play the last two matches of 2011, Fiegert replied that he had a stress fracture in his foot last year.

The WAFC informed all WAFL presidents of the identity of the suspended player’s club but stayed away from disclosing name of the player. The matter was being overseen by WA Football Commission integrity manager Steve Hargrave, who is the only WAFC official who was authorized to discuss it but said confidentiality requirements meant he could not comment. In 2010, ASADA conducted 24 WAFL tests but doubled that last year and may double again this season at a cost of nearly $100,000.

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Sunday 23, Sep 2012

US Soccer Goalkeeper Accepts Public Warning

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US Soccer Goalkeeper Accepts Public Warning

U.S. national team goalkeeper Hope Solo received a public warning from the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) after testing positive for the banned substance Canrenone in a urine test. The 30-year-old accepted the warning and was still made a part of the United States soccer team in the Olympic tournament.

In a statement, Solo said she took a medication that was prescribed by her personal doctor for pre-menstrual purposes and she was not aware of the diuretic properties of the medication. She added that she immediately cooperated with USADA as soon as she was informed of this fact and using the medication was an honest mistake. U.S. Soccer also issued a statement to express its support for the goalkeeper and said it fully cooperated with USADA during the disciplinary process.

Canrenone is classified as a specified substance and its presence in the sample of an athlete can result in a reduced sanction. It is marketed under the brand names Contaren and Luvion and an aldosterone antagonist with additional anti-androgen properties that is used as a diuretic in Europe. It is prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) anti-doping rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”) and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List.

Hope Solo published her best-selling autobiography Solo: A Memoir of Hope after the 2012 London Olympics, where she received her second Olympic gold medal. The autobiography debuted at No. 3 on the New York Times hardcover non-fiction best seller list, which is the highest ever for a soccer book.

Born in Richland, Washington on July 30, 1981, she scored 109 goals, leading her team to three consecutive league titles from 1996–1998 and a state championship in her senior year and switched to the goalkeeper position at the University of Washington. Solo’s senior debut came in an 8–0 win over Iceland at Davidson, North Carolina in April 2000 and she was named in the Olympic team in 2004. She was an important part of the U.S. women’s team that won the gold medal by defeating Brazil 1–0 in extra time at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. During the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup, she won the “Golden Glove” award for best goalkeeper and the “Bronze Ball” award for her overall performance and featured in the “All-star” team of the tournament.

Considered one of the world’s top goalkeepers, Hope Solo has been the regular U.S. keeper for nearly six years. She famously criticized the move of Coach Greg Ryan during the 2007 World Cup in China when Ryan benched her against Brazil for veteran Briana Scurry, a hero of the 1999 world champions. The United States was routed 4-0 and Solo said leaving her behind was a wrong decision. This prompted Ryan to dismiss her from the world Cup team and the keeper was not allowed on the bench for the third-place game and flew back home from China on her own. After this controversy, Pia Sundhage took over as coach and Solo has remained her top goalkeeper ever since then.

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Saturday 22, Sep 2012

Weightlifter Patrick Mendes Banned

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Weightlifter Patrick Mendes Banned

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has banned Olympic weightlifter Patrick Mendes after he tested positive for human growth hormone (HGH), a banned substance.

The weightlifter from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” in Las Vegas, Nevada failed anti-doping controls on February 7 and February 27, 2012 prior to the 2012 United States Olympic Team Trials for Weightlifting that determine who would represent the United States at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Patrick Mendes was the top-ranked U.S. Olympic weightlifter at over 105 kilograms.

Mendes was the protégé of renowned weightlifting coach John Broz who lived and trained during his competitive career with legendary Bulgarian superheavyweight Antonio Krastev, who recorded a world record snatch of 216 kilograms in 1987.

The 21-year-old Mendes who was a U.S. Olympic hopeful in weightlifting tested positive for human growth hormone (HGH). The prospective medal favorite in the super heavyweight division at the London Olympics confessed to using the drug after testing positive in two tests administered in February, according to the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) in a statement.

Graduated from Del Sol High in Las Vegas, Patrick Mendes accepted a two-year ban, which commenced on March 19. His positive test results for HGH were the result of two separate samples collected on February 7, 2012, and February 27, 2012 as part of USADA’s Out of Competition Testing Program. The samples of Mendes were tested at the WADA-accredited Sports Medicine Research & Testing Laboratory (SMRTL), located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Human Growth Hormone is prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Weightlifting Federation (“IWF”) Anti-Doping Policies, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

The weightlifter admitted his use of HGH and accepted a period of two years of ineligibility that began on March 19, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. As a result of the sanction, Mendes is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on or subsequent to February 7, 2012, the date the first blood sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart said the case demonstrates yet again that the human growth hormone testing works to stop this dangerous drug from being used in sport and added that the agency is pleased that Mendes chose to admit his use of HGH and accept the sanction.

With this suspension, the weightlifter become only the second U.S. athlete found using human growth hormone, the first being minor-league baseball player Mike Jacobs, who tested positive under the program instituted by Major League Baseball last summer.

In another development, 19-year-old Olympic weightlifter Joshua Gilbert of Las Vegas, Nev. from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” tested positive for the diuretic furosemide at the 2012 National Weightlifting Championships that was held in conjunction with the U.S. Olympic Trials as part of the Arnold Sports Festival in Columbus (Ohio) on March 2, 2012. Joshua Gilbert was suspended for a period of three years for his anti-doping rule violation by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).


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Friday 21, Sep 2012

Olympic Weightlifter Joshua Gilbert Banned

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Olympic Weightlifter Joshua Gilbert Banned

Olympic weightlifter Joshua Gilbert of Las Vegas, Nev., an athlete in the sport of weightlifting, accepted a suspension of three years from the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) for his anti-doping rule violation.

The 19-year-old tested positive for Furosemide on March 2, 2012 at the National Championships, and refused to submit to doping control on March 20, 2012. Since Gilbert had not yet been notified of the results of the March 2nd test prior to his refusal to submit, under the rules both incidents are classified as one anti-doping rule violation. Both the incidents are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Weightlifting Federation (“IWF”) Anti-Doping Policies, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

Gilbert was banned from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” (Las Vegas, Nevada) after he tested positive for a banned substance.

Aggravating circumstances justify a period of ineligibility greater than the standard sanction, and as such the weightlifter received a three-year period of ineligibility for his anti-doping rule violation which began on April 5, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional suspension in accordance with the WADA Code.

Joshua Gilbert s also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on or subsequent to, March 2, 2012, the date his sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes. Gilbert, a promising Olympic lifter who trained under John Broz, tested positive for diuretic furosemide at the 2012 National Weightlifting Championships that was held in conjunction with the U.S. Olympic Trials as part of the Arnold Sports Festival in Columbus (Ohio) on March 2, 2012. Broz lived and trained with legendary Bulgarian superheavyweight Antonio Krastev, who recorded a world record snatch of 216 kilograms in 1987, during his career.

Furosemide is listed as a masking agent because of its potential to assist in elimination of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing drugs from the body besides helping athletes to make weight in sports with multiple weight classes like weightlifting, boxing, and wrestling.

In another development, Patrick Mendes also from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” tested positive for human growth hormone and was suspended for a period of two years. The 21-year-old tested positive for Human Growth Hormone (HGH) as the result of two separate samples collected on February 7, 2012, and February 27, 2012 as part of USADA’s Out of Competition Testing Program. The samples were tested at the WADA-accredited Sports Medicine Research & Testing Laboratory (SMRTL), located in Salt Lake City, Utah. HGH is prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Weightlifting Federation (“IWF”) Anti-Doping Policies, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code. He accepted a two-year period of ineligibility, which began on March 19, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional suspension.

A U.S. Olympic hopeful in weightlifting, Mendes, tested positive for human growth hormone (HGH). Mendes, who graduated from Del Sol High in Las Vegas, accepted a two-year ban, which commenced on March 19. Mendes became the second U.S. athlete found using HGH after minor-league baseball player Mike Jacobs, who tested positive under the program instituted by Major League Baseball last summer.

Olympic Weightlifter Joshua Gilbert Banned

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