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Archive for  October 2012

Wednesday 31, Oct 2012

No Respite For Disgraced Cyclist, Loses Key To The City Of Adelaide

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No respite for disgraced cyclist, loses key to the city of adelaide

 

The woes of seven-time Tour de France winner and disgraced cyclist, Lance Armstrong, are increasing with every passing day. After being banned by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA) and stripped of all his titles, the cyclist has just lost the key to the City of Adelaide.

Adelaide City Council, in an unprecedented move, voted to withdraw the honor for Armstrong less than a year after it decided to award the key. The council voted 6-1 for stripping the cyclist of the honor with Tony Williamson dissenting. With this, the cyclist becomes the first of 33 key recipients to lose the honor. A week back, Lord Mayor Stephen Yarwood said the cyclist would be retaining the key since he had raised the profile of the Tour Down Under and cancer research. However, the council is expected to remove the cyclist’s name from its honor board rather than physically retrieve the key. This move came after a vandal splattered red paint on the poster of the banned cyclist above the Nike shop in Rundle Mall.

In the last few weeks, Lance Armstrong has lost much of his legacy with major sponsors like Nike, and even some smaller ones like Anheuser-Busch and Trek bicycles dropping the cyclist. If that was not all, a previously unheard sworn deposition from New Zealand rider Stephen Swart in a 2006 American court case is back to haunt the cyclist. Swart alleged that Armstrong and members of his USPS team bribed him and his team to throw the final two legs of a series of races in 1993. It was alleged that the cyclist offered a bribe of $50,000 to Swart and his team to not “be aggressive and challenge,” in the last two races. Swart said that he could not understand why the cyclist made such an offer as he would have won anyway and added that they got their money a few weeks after his victory. It is believed that legendary Australian cyclist and former Armstrong mentor Phil Anderson were allegedly in the hotel room when the bribery deal was made between the two and Anderson said he could not recall such a deal but denied it happening either.

His ex-fiancee Sheryl Crow was also interviewed by federal agents in late 2011 after multiple witnesses encouraged them to press her for information about the cyclist and the doping program that propped up his Tour de France teams. This was after many witnesses said Crow would have been privy to details about the blood transfusions the cyclist is accused of orchestrating. The cyclist was even accused of encouraging teammates to use performance enhancing drugs and replacing cyclists who refused to use those drugs. Armstrong has still maintained his innocence but decided to abandon his legal challenge to the USADA while those who were made victims of his strong-arm tactics feel relieved and vindicated after the USADA report brought an end to the phony empire of wealth, adulation, and power that was believed to be protected at all costs.

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Tuesday 30, Oct 2012

Former Swiss Rider Denies Doping Network Links

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Former swiss rider denies doping network links

An accomplished rider in both the Grand Tour events and one-day races, Switzerland’s Tony Rominger, has denied his management company having links to what is believed by Italian investigators as a network designed to finance doping, aid evasion of taxes, and money laundering.

Italian officials are investigating the activities of sports doctor Michele Ferrari in the wake of a report against cyclist Lance Armstrong and his USPS team from the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) wherein the agency accused Armstrong of overseeing a widespread doping program. The cyclist was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life, a decision that was recently endorsed by the governing body of cycling, the UCI.

It was alleged by two Swiss newspapers that cash from operations of Ferrari went through the management company of Tony Rominger. Rominger issued a statement saying, “Tony Rominger formally contests these accusations of tax evasion and money laundering being reported in the media,” and added that he had no contact with Ferrari for “very many years.” Rominger added that he had never been called upon to provide information to the penal, civil or administrative judicial system — either Swiss or Italian.

The accusations were immediately and vehemently denied by the professional road racing cyclist who won the Vuelta a España in 1992, 1993, and 1994, and the Giro d’Italia in 1995. The cyclist also won the Mountains Jersey twice in the Vuelta a Espana, in 1993 and 1996 and the the Points Jersey in the 1993 Vuelta a Espana. In the 1992 World Championship Road Race, Rominger was placed fourth behind Gianni Bugno of Italy, Laurent Jalabert of France, and Dimitri Konyshev of Russia. In the 1993 Tour de France, Rominger finished second behind Miguel Indurain of Spain. The cyclist had a successful career but was overshadowed by the prowess of Indurain (winner of  five consecutive Tours de France from 1991 to 1995, the fourth to win five times) in the Grand Tours.

Meanwhile, Indurain has openly extended his support of Lance Armstrong and said he believes in the innocence of Armstrong. He went on to dispute the strength of evidence against the cyclist and remarked that he believes Armstrong will come back and appeal and try to show that he played fair for all those years. Indurain also took issue with the investigation process and challenged the validity of the evidence produced against the seven-time Tour de France champion, Armstrong who was stripped of all his titles and banned for life by the US Anti-doping Agency (USADA) relying on witness testimony from 11 former teammates and 15 other riders.

Despite the fact that the governing body of cycling accepted the sanctions imposed on Armstrong by USADA, the UCI president, Pat McQuaid, delivered a different message to the world by calling USADA evidence and methods into questions and raising grounds for a possible appeal – either by Armstrong himself, or by the World Anti-Doping Agency – against the conclusions of the report. McQuaid also challenged the USADA jurisdiction in stripping Armstrong of his titles under the WADA Code and publishing its report after the cyclist waived his right to a Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) hearing.

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Monday 29, Oct 2012

Armstrong May Not Lose All Earnings

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Armstrong may not lose all earnings

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) and the governing body of cycling, UCI, may have stripped disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong from seven Tour de France titles he won from 1998 to 2005 and banned him for life, but all is still not lost for the cyclist.

The cyclist was recently asked to return the prize money associated with his Tour de France wins. But independent lawyers and advisers believe that the cyclist would be giving away an estimated $3.9 million in prize money he won in the Tour and pay some hefty legal bills, which will still be a very small share of his estimated net worth of $125 million.

A big part of the money to Armstrong came from his sponsors like Nike, Anheuser-Busch, FRS, and Honey Stinger. Despite the fact that all have dropped him, it still remains to be seen what damage the brands will suffer. The United States Postal Service paid tens of millions of dollars for sponsoring the cyclist. No amount of wrongdoings by athletes will force the USPS team to forfeit the money they were paid by sponsors and the worst that can happen is that their contracts are voided.

It is believed that Lance Armstrong may still refuse to pay back the sponsors by saying that none of the accusations against him had been proved and sponsors would have to dwell out lots of money to prove doping allegations against the cyclist.

Carl Sweat, chief executive of FRS, said Lance Armstrong helped them build the brand and losing him is disappointing. The company said it is using the services of Tim Tebow, the New York Jets quarterback with a squeaky-clean reputation, as its main pitchman.

Armstrong has his biggest share of problems coming from SCA Promotions, a company in Dallas that insures potentially costly but unlikely events. The cyclist sued the company in 2004 for not paying him a bonus of $5 million after he won the sixth Tour de France title to which the company replied it will not pay as doping accusations were made against the cyclist. The company settled the suit in 2007 and paid Armstrong $7.5 million, including interest and fees. The company’s corporate counsel, Jeffrey Dorough, said the firm was sending a letter to Mr. Armstrong demanding that he return $12 million — the $7.5 million and an additional $4.5 million it paid for a previous victory. The counsel remarked it is inappropriate for the cyclist to keep any bonuses that were contingent on him being the champion of the Tour de France.

The biggest hurdle before Armstrong will be a False Claims Act lawsuit against him and Tailwind Sports, the limited liability corporation that owned his team. A former teammate of Mr. Armstrong’s and another Tour de France winner, Floyd Landis, had filed a whistle-blower lawsuit in late 2010 asserting that the government — the Postal Service, in this case — had been defrauded. Michael Sullivan, head of the whistle-blower practice group at Finch McCranie, an Atlanta-based law firm, said now the government would not have to prove that the cyclist used the money of the USPS team to buy performance enhancing drugs for his team.

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Sunday 28, Oct 2012

US Cycling Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Us cycling athlete accepts sanction

Roger Hernandez, of Miami, Fla., an athlete in the sport of cycling, has accepted a two-year suspension for an anti-doping rule violation, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The violation was based on a refusal by Hernandez to submit to a sample collection. The 45-year-old Hernandez refused to take part in an In-Competition doping control test on July 29, 2011 at the Masters Track Nationals in Trexlertown. The refusal of an athlete to provide a sample when notified that he has been selected for doping control constitutes a rule violation under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Cycling Union (UCI) Anti-Doping Rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

A two- year period of ineligibility was accepted by Hernandez that began on August 21, 2011 the day after he last competed. The cycling athlete is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to July 29, 2011, the date upon which he refused to submit to sample collection, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the sanction.

Roger Hernandez is a body builder and a cycling champion with numerous titles. The athlete finished second in the keirin state final, won a world masters title in 2003, and headed to Portugal with intent on winning again. During day 4 of the USA Cycling Masters Track Nationals in Trexlertown, PA (July 29, 2011), Roger Hernandez of the Nitroshot cycling team came third behind Todd Hayes and Kirk Whiteman with a time of 11.607.

After the suspension of Hernandez, USA Cycling adjusted results from the 2011 Masters Track National Championships. Michael Miller of Morgantown, Pa., also accepted a suspension for anti-doping violation. The 42-year-old Miller tested positive for methylhexaneamine, a stimulant, as a result of a sample collected at the Masters Track Nationals, on July 27, 2011, in Trexlertown and accepted an eight-month period of ineligibility, which began on September 2, 2011, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. Methylhexaneamine is classified as a Specified Substance, and therefore the presence of that substance in an athlete’s sample can result in a reduced sanction. Miller is also disqualified from all results obtained during the Masters Track Nationals, which began on July 26, 2011, as well as any other competitive results obtained subsequent to July 26, 2011, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes.

The game of cycling is noticing some bad examples for the game in the last few months. A few months back, seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong was stripped of all his titles and banned for life by the United States Anti-doping Agency. This was after the cyclist was accused by former teammates of using anabolic steroids, human growth hormone, EPO, cortisone, and other performance enhancing drugs during an illustrious career with the USPS cycling team. Floyd Landis, Taylor Hamilton, and Frankie Andreu said every one in the team knew that he was using performance enhancing drugs and Armstrong even once claimed that the UCI, governing body of cycling, has swept his positive test.

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Saturday 27, Oct 2012

Damon Allen Accepts Sanction for Doping Violation

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Damon allen accepts sanction for doping violation

Damon Allen, Jr. of Philadelphia, an athlete in the sport of boxing, has tested positive for a prohibited substance and accepted a suspension for his doping offense, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 19-year-old Allen, Jr. tested positive for Furosemide, a diuretic, as the result of an out-of-competition sample collected on July 19, 2011.

Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Boxing Association (AIBA) anti-doping rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, diuretics are prohibited and listed as Specified Substances, and therefore the presence of those substances in an athlete’s sample can result in a reduced sanction.

A six-month period of ineligibility was accepted by Allen, Jr. that began on September 1, 2011, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. The boxing athlete is also disqualified from all results obtained on or subsequent to July 19, 2011, the day his urine sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes as a result of the sanction.

Damon was the silver medalist at the 2010 National Golden Gloves (Little Rock, Ark.) and took the first place at the 2009 Junior National Golden Gloves (Mesquito, Nev.). The boxer won the first place at the 2008 & 2009 Ringside World Championships (Kansas City, Mo.); Placed second at the 2009 Junior Olympic Nationals (Denver, Colo.) and the Third place at the 2008 Junior Olympic Nationals (Marquette, Mich.). A runner-up in 2010 National Golden Gloves tournament and a semi-finalist at 2011 US championships, the Northern Michigan University student lost all results since then but his ban is retroactive to September 1, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. The boxer fought in the US Olympic Boxing Trials in Mobile, Alabama, but did not book a spot for the London Olympics in the 132-pound division.

Furosemide is a diuretic but is commonly used as a masking agent and high-profile fighters such as Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. and former Guzman rival, Ali Funeka, and former Jr. Featherweight and super featherweight champion, Joan Guzman, have served suspensions for the banned substance. Furosemide or Lasix is a loop diuretic that is used for treating congestive heart failure and edema and is even used for preventing Thoroughbred and Standardbred race horses from bleeding through the nose during races and can increase the risk of digoxin toxicity due to hypokalemia. The drug is also suggested for health complications including Nephrotic syndrome, in adjunct therapy for cerebral/pulmonary edema where rapid diuresis is required (IV injection), hepatic cirrhosis, renal impairment, and in the management of severe hypercalcemia in combination with adequate rehydration. It is a noncompetitive subtype-specific blocker of GABA-A receptors and is detectable in urine 36–72 hours following injection. Furosemide is injected either intramuscularly (IM) or intravenously (IV) and its use is prohibited by most equestrian organizations. The drug is included on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s banned drug list as it can be used allegedly as a masking agent for other drugs.


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Friday 26, Oct 2012

Hockey Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Hockey athlete accepts sanction

According to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA), Pamela Spuehler of Chula Vista, CA, an athlete in the sport of field hockey, has tested positive for a prohibited substance.

The 25-year-old accepted a suspension for her doping offense after testing positive for Canrenone, a diuretic, as the result of an out-of-competition sample collected on September 14, 2011.

Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Hockey Federation (FIH) anti-doping rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, diuretics are prohibited.

A two-month period of ineligibility was accepted by Spuehler that began on September 28, 2011, the day USADA received notice of the adverse finding, and will end on November 30, 2011. The hockey athlete is also disqualified from all results obtained on or subsequent to September 14, 2011, the day her urine sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes as a result of the sanction.

Pam Spuehler clarified that she accepted a sanction of two months for the inadvertent use of a prescription diuretic. She has used a used a prescription medication, under the care and instruction of her doctor, for a medical condition since 2006 and remarked that she did not knew that the prescription medication contained a banned diuretic and is used for masking the presence of anabolic steroids and performance enhancing drugs. She represented her medical history to the United States Anti-doping Agency that agreed to reduce her suspension to two months, ending on November 30. Spuehler stated that her mistake is a reminder to all athletes that they need to be very careful with whatever they take even if prescribed by their family doctor. The hockey star said she is determined to come back to competition and prove that her success is because of hard work and discipline and nothing else.

She was recently hired by Ohio Field Hockey as its new assistant coach in the spring of 2012. Pamela Spuehler arrived in Athens after serving as assistant coach for the Boston University, stints with top-level hockey leagues in Australia and Germany, and playing for the USA National Team. A three-time All-American for the Terriers and the first four-time all-conference selection and one of the most decorated players in Boston University field hockey history, Spuehler was nominated as a senior for the Honda Award, given annually to the top collegiate field hockey player in the country.

Spuehler was one of four collegiate players invited to play with the USA B Team for its matches against Japan and Canada in March 2008 in San Diego and a key member of the New England HPC squad that captured its first-ever title at the National Championship in 2007. She was named the recipient of the 2008 Mildred Barnes Award, signifying the top female athlete at the Boston University and helped the Terriers claim three straight conference titles and was twice named the Most Outstanding Player of the America East Championship (2006, 2007). The midfielder, as a senior, scored a team-best 37 points on 11 goals and 15 assists to help BU reach the NCAA quarterfinals for the first time since 1991.


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Thursday 25, Oct 2012

U.S. Rowing Athlete Accepts Sanction

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U.s. rowing athlete accepts sanction

An athlete in the sport of rowing, Matt Kochem, of Somerset, N.J., has accepted a one-year suspension for committing an anti-doping rule violation in which he failed to file whereabouts information, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 25-year-old Kochem is a member of the USADA National Testing Pool that consists of a select group of athletes subject to certain whereabouts requirements in order to be located for USADA Out-of-Competition testing. The rowing athlete failed to comply with the whereabouts requirements and, as a result, accrued three Whereabouts Failures within an 18-month period. The combination of three Whereabouts Failures within an 18-month period constitutes a rule violation under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Federation of Rowing Associations (FISA) anti-doping rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”).

A Whereabouts Failure for National Testing Pool athletes includes a failure to offer required quarterly whereabouts filings and/or failure to be available for testing due to inaccurate or incomplete information provided by the athlete.

The one-year period of ineligibility of Kochem began on April 12, 2012, the date he accepted the sanction. The athlete has been disqualified from all competitive results achieved on and subsequent to January 21, 2012 the date of his third Whereabouts Failure, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the violation.

Born in Littleton, Colorado, Kochem began rowing at the Burnt Hills Rowing Association in 1998 and finished fifth in the lightweight eight at the 2010 World Rowing Championships. Matt Kochem took the silver in the lightweight eight at the 2009 World Rowing Championships and finished second in the Temple Challenge Cup at the 2007 Henley Royal Regatta. At the 2006 Henley Royal Regatta, Kochem finished second in the Temple Challenge Cup and won the lightweight eight at the 2011 World Rowing Championships Trials. Kochem won the lightweight eight at the 2010 World Rowing Championships Trials and the lightweight eight at the 2009 World Rowing Championships Trials.

Kochem also won gold in the lightweight eight at the 2009 US Rowing National Championships, lightweight eight at the 2008 IRA Championships, lightweight eight at the 2007 IRA Championships, and the lightweight eight at the 2006 IRA Championships. In 2008, Matt Kochem was team captain at Cornell University in 2008 and was the recipient of the Excellence Fellowship in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers University.

The U.S. national team roster for the World Rowing Championships had Kochem in the lightweight Men’s Eight (LM8+) along with John Carlson (Belmont, Mass.), Jimmy Sopko (Mathews, Va.), Kenny McMahon (Ladysmith, Wis.), Christian Klein (Herndon, Va.), William Newell (Weston, Mass.), Nicholas LaCava (Weston, Conn.), Edward King (Ironton, Mo.), and Austin Meyer (Cohoes, N.Y.). Kochem was part of the US Lightweight Men’s Eight after winning their event at the 2009 World Rowing Championships in Poznan, Poland along with Kerry Quinn, Jim Spoko, Andrew Diebold, Matt Muffelman, Ryan Fox, Kenny McMahon, Anthony Fahden, and Skip Dise.

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Wednesday 24, Oct 2012

Track And Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Track and field athlete accepts sanction

Matthew DiBuono, of New Rochelle, N.Y., an athlete in the sport of track and field, has tested positive for prohibited substances in multiple samples, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 24-year-old DiBuono accepted a suspension for his doping offense. The offense pertains to a sample provided by the athlete at the 2011 USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships in Eugene, Oregon that resulted in adverse analytical finding for the administration of synthetic steroids.

During an out-of-competition test on August 4, 2011, a subsequent sample collected from DiBuono resulted in an adverse analytical finding for the presence of metabolites of the steroid, stanozolol. Both the tests reflected the presence of anabolic agents that are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the rules of the International Association of Athletic Federations, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”) and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List.

This case was an “aggravating circumstances” case, under the rules of the Code and this allowed the USADA to increase the standard two-year period of ineligibility to the maximum under the Code of a four-year period of ineligibility. In the case, those circumstances included the use of multiple prohibited substances on multiple occasions.

A four-year period of ineligibility was accepted by DiBuono and it began on August 17, 2011, the day he accepted a provisional sanction. DiBuono is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to June 23, 2011, the day the first sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the violation.

The former Fordham Male Student-Athlete of the Year qualified for the 2011 U.S. Outdoor Track & Field National Championship and holds the Fordham school record in the hammer throw at 214′ 4″, competed for Shore AC at a meet held at West Point on June 1st, recording a mark of 76.60 meters or 251′ 4″ in the hammer throw. This distance surpassed the U.S. “A” Standard qualifying mark of 69.00 meters or 226′ 4″ for U.S. Nationals to make him the first former Fordham athlete to make the National Championship since Lauren Gubicza did in the early 1990s. His mark of 251′ 4″ is the second-best mark by any U.S. competitor this year, behind only Kibwé Johnson of the New York Athletic Club (NYAC) at 262′ 9″ (80.09 meters) that was set in Uberlándia, Brazil on May 18th, 2011.

 The mark also ranks him currently 14th in the world, based on the current listing on HammerThrow.eu. He was a three-time Atlantic 10 champion in the hammer throw, a two-time Athlete of the Meet at the Metropolitan Championship, and the 2009 Vincent T. Lombardi Award winner as Male Student-Athlete of the Year. His throw of 239’ – 8” in Eugene, Oregon with the 16 pound hammer placed him third and officially earned him a spot on the USA National Team which will compete at the Track and Field World Championships in Daegu, South Korea.

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Tuesday 23, Oct 2012

US Taekwondo Athlete Receives Sanction

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Us taekwondo athlete receives sanction

Nathaniel Tadd of Houston, Texas, an athlete in the sport of Taekwondo, has tested positive for a prohibited substance, according to a statement issued by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 20-year-old received a suspension for his doping offense after testing positive for methylhexaneamine, a stimulant. The positive test pertains to a urine sample collected at the Senior Nationals competition, on July 3, 2011, in San Jose, California. Stimulants are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic Movement Testing and the rules of the World Taekwondo Federation, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List.

A two-year period of ineligibility was received by Tadd that began on November 16, 2011, the day he received his sanction. The Taekwondo athlete is also disqualified from all results obtained during the Senior Nationals, which began on June 28, 2011, as well as any other competitive results obtained subsequent to June 28, 2011, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

An advisory was issued by the USADA on June 16, 2011 for making athletes aware of the concerns regarding methylhexaneamine.

Methylhexaneamine is a stimulant and was first placed on the WADA Prohibited List in 2010 classed as a Non Specified Stimulant. It has been re-classified as a Specified Stimulant from 2011 and is prohibited in-competition only. Products that contain any of the following ingredients on the label (Methylhexaneamine; Methylhexanamine; DMAA (dimethylamylamine); Geranamine; Forthane; Forthan; Floradrene; 2-hexanamine, 4-methyl-; 2-hexanamine, 4-methyl- (9CI); 4-methyl-2-hexanamine; 1,3-dimethylamylamine; 4-Methylhexan-2-amine; 1,3-dimethylpentylamine; 2-amino-4-methylhexane; Pentylamine, 1, 3-dimethyl) are reported as an Adverse Analytical Finding for Methylhexaneamine. Methylhexaneamine (MHA) was retained in the Prohibited List for 2012 by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). In 2010, Methylhexaneamine topped the stimulants list for 123 adverse analytical findings worldwide in all sports that accounted for 21.4 per cent of cases in that particular drug class. Many products sold as dietary supplements openly list this substance on their labels like Jack3d (USP Labs), Lipo-6-Black and Hemo-Rage Black (Nutrex), Spriodex (Gaspari Nutrition), F-10 (Advanced Genetics), Clear Shot (E-Pharm), 1.M.R. (BPI Sports), and many others.

The drug figured prominently during the 2010 Commonwealth Games in New Delhi wherein swimmers Richa Mishra, Amar Muralidharan and Jyotsna Pansare, wrestlers Rajeev Tomar, Rahul Mann, Sumeet, Joginder, Mausam Khatri and Gursharanpreet Kaur, and athletes Saurabh Vij and Akash Antil tested positive to it just before the 2010 Commonwealth Games in Delhi. Methylhexaneamine or DMAA s marketed under many names as a dietary supplement but its safety has been questioned. It was originally developed to be used as a nasal decongestant and treatment for hypertrophied or hyperplasic oral tissue. It was reintroduced in 2006 as a dietary supplement under the trademarked name Geranamine. On 19 June 2012, the South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) made an announcement that the 2012 Comrades Marathon winner, Ludwick Mamabolo, tested positive for the banned stimulant. The New Zealand government indicated in November 2009 that methylhexaneamine would be scheduled as a restricted substance and made illegal the sale of DMAA products after 7 April 2012.


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Monday 22, Oct 2012

USA Boxing Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Usa boxing athlete accepts sanction

According to an announcement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA), Michael Hunter of Las Vegas, Nev., an athlete in the sport of boxing, has tested positive for a prohibited substance. The anti-doping agency also remarked that Hunter has accepted a suspension for his doping offense.

The 23-year-old Hunter tested positive for tetrahydrocannabinol acid, a marijuana metabolite in the class of Cannabinoids, in a sample collected on August 5, 2011 at the U.S. Team Trials in Mobile, Alabama.

Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Boxing Association (AIBA) Anti-Doping Rules, cannabinoids are prohibited. Both the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the AIBA have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the WADA Prohibited List. Cannabinoids are listed as Specified Substances and their presence in the sample of an athlete can result in a reduced sanction.

A three-month period of ineligibility was accepted by the boxer and it started on September 21, 2011, the day he accepted a provisional sanction. The period of ineligibility was suspended and reduced to time served, upon his successful completion of a USADA anti-doping educational program that he completed on October 7, 2011. The boxer has been disqualified from his competitive results achieved on August 5, 2011, the day he provided his sample, through and including the date the doping education program was completed, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the doping violation.

Born on July 10, 1988, Michael Hunter is an American heavyweight boxer who won the National Super Heavyweight championships in 2007 and 2009. Son of Mike “the Bounty” Hunter and coached by KC Ken Croom, he made it to the finals of the National Golden Gloves with only five bouts in 2006 at the age of 18. In 2007, he beat Lenroy Thompson and narrowly outpointed two-time winner Mike Wilson to win the US championships. Hunter dropped down to 201 lbs and won the Golden Gloves title in 2011 and managed to qualify for the London Olympics by winning his qualifier against Julio Castillo and Yamil Peralta. He has worked in the Tyrolean Mountains of Austria with the Klitschko brothers, Wladimir, the World Boxing Association and International Boxing Federation champion, and Vitali, who holds the World Boxing Council title and had to take a less direct route to qualifying for the London Games by this year winning the USA Boxing national championships and then a second tournament in Brazil.

The 201lb sensation from Sin City was on his way to compete against the best in the World in Baku, Azerbaijan for the AIBA Men’s World Championships before a failed drug test prompted him to “voluntarily withdrawal” from the US Olympic Team (aka United States representative for World Championship to Qualify for the Olympics). In August 2011, Michael Hunter stormed through the competition to win the Olympic trials but then was stripped of his victories after testing positive for the drug.  He got back in training and this year qualified for London at the last tournament, in Brazil after a three-month ban and wants to win a gold medal and become the heavyweight champion of the world.

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