Armstrong Apologizes To People In Cycling Community

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong has made a series of phone calls and apologized directly to key people in the cycling community in what is seen by many as a valiant attempt by him to restore his image. On the eve of Monday’s taped interview with Oprah Winfrey, this is an attempt from the cyclist to prepare himself and others for what is anticipated to be a partial confession and for making amends with those to whom he lied and misled about sports doping.

The much-awaited interview of Armstrong with Oprah Winfrey will mark the first public comments he has made about the widespread allegations in a 1,000-page document that was released late last year by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. The USADA report that was based on the testimony of 11 of Armstrong’s former teammates led to the cyclist being stripped of his seven consecutive Tour de France titles and banned for life from cycling.

The USADA “reasoned decision” concluded that Armstrong’s cycling heroics were the result of “the most sophisticated, professional and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.” The evidence included sworn statements of more than two dozen (24+) witnesses, including fifteen (15) professional cyclists, and a dozen (12) members of Armstrong’s cycling teams, including eleven (11) former teammates and his former soigneur (masseuse). The cyclist was accused of using and/or attempting use of prohibited substances and/or methods including EPO, blood transfusions, testosterone, corticosteroids and/or masking agents. Lance Armstrong was also accused of assisting, encouraging, aiding,  abetting, covering up and other complicity involving one or more anti-doping rule violations and/or attempted anti-doping rule violations besides the possession of prohibited substances and/or methods including EPO, blood transfusions and related equipment (such as needles, blood bags, storage containers and other transfusion equipment and blood parameters measuring devices), testosterone, corticosteroids, and/or masking agents.

USADA charged the cyclist with violations of the following specific rules applicable to the possession of prohibited substances and/or methods: USOC NADP (and incorporated provisions of Code); USADA Protocol (incorporated provisions of Code or UCI ADR); UCI ADR 52, 54, 93 (1997-2000); UCI ADR 130, 131, 135 (2001-2004); UCI ADR 15.6 (2005-2008); UCI ADR 21.6 (2009-present); and Code Article 2.6 (2003-present). The anti-doping agency also Armstrong with violations of the following specific rules applicable to trafficking and attempted trafficking: USOC NADP (and incorporated provisions of Code); USADA Protocol (incorporated provisions of Code or UCI ADR); UCI ADR 3, 135, 136 (2001-04); UCI ADR 15.7 (2005-2008); UCI ADR 21.7 (2009-present); and Code Article 2.7 (2003-present).

In addition to that, the cyclist was charged with violations of the following specific rules applicable to administration and/or attempted administration: USOC NADP (and incorporated provisions of Code); USADA Protocol (incorporated provisions of Code or UCI ADR); UCI ADR 1, 2, 54, 93 (1997-2000); UCI ADR 3, 133 (2001-2004); UCI ADR 15.8 (2005-2008); UCI ADR 21.8 (2009-present); and Code Article 2.8 (2003-present). USADA went on to charge Armstrong with violations of the following specific rules applicable to aggravating circumstances: USOC NADP (and incorporated provisions of Code); USADA Protocol (incorporated provisions of Code or UCI ADR); UCI ADR 130 (4 years to life for intentional doping) (2001-2004); UCI ADR 305 (2009-present) and Code Article 10.6 (2009-present).

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