Lamine Diack, the former anti-doping chief of International Association of Athletics Federations, has been placed under criminal investigation on charges of bribery and money laundering. Diack is suspected of taking about 200,000 euros ($220,000) in bribes in an alleged cover-up of positive Russian doping tests.

Jean-Yves Lourgouilloux, a French prosecutor, revealed Diack and other IAAF officials were suspected of taking money in the year 2011 to permit at least six athletes from Russia to continue competing, some of them participating at the London 2012 Olympics, when they should have been barred for doping. Lourgouilloux said they decided not to act and now we understand why as it was in exchange for money.

Dr. Gabriel Dolle joins former IAAF President Lamine Diack and Diack’s legal adviser, Habib Cisse, under formal investigation, according to a statement by the French office for financial prosecutions. Diack is being investigated on preliminary charges of aggravated money laundering and corruption while Cisse and Dolle face only the corruption charge. Diack was released on bail of 500,000 euros. The French investigation began after a complaint by the World Anti-Doping Agency. WADA initiated a commission for investigating allegations raised during the December 2014 documentary by German broadcaster ARD.

In a statement, the World Anti-Doping Agency said its goal was to investigate the validity of allegations of doping practices; corrupt practices around sample collection and results management; and, other ineffective administration of anti-doping processes that implicate Russia, the IAAF, athletes, coaches, trainers, doctors and other members of athletes’ entourages; as well as, the accredited laboratory based in Moscow and the Russian Anti-Doping Agency.

The entire controversy started when ARD and Britain’s Sunday Times newspaper alleged hundreds of athletes had returned “suspicious” doping tests results after examination of a leaked database that had more than 12,000 blood tests from 5,000 athletes between 2001 and 2012. Eminent Australian scientists Michael Ashenden and Robin Parisotto confirmed the findings but IAAF condemned as ‘naive’ the two blood experts. The world governing body of athletics said the two scientists conveniently ignore the fact that more than 60 athletes have been sanctioned on the basis of abnormal blood values collected after 2009 and added that their statement does not address the fact that they had no knowledge whatsoever of the actions taken by the IAAF in following these suspicious profiles. The athletics’ governing body said it acknowledges that these two scientists have a great degree of expertise in the analysis of blood profiles and it is for these reasons that we are so disappointed.

Arne Ljungqvist, the former chairman of the International Olympic Committee’s medical commission, also came to the defense at that time. Ljungqvist said the world governing body of athletics did more than others, before others but is now criticized by people, who have no insight into the work of International Association of Athletics Federations, for not having done enough that is highly unfair to the governing body, an institution that should be regarded in high respect for its innumerable efforts and investment, throughout its history, for tackling doping in athletics in the most efficient and intelligent ways.

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