Higher rejection incidence following early steroid withdrawal  According to a new study on early steroid withdrawal following liver transplantation, it has been revealed that there is a high incidence of rejection and a low incidence of intolerance that necessitates treatment for diabetes. This first double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted to examine the effects of early steroid elimination.

The results of this study were published in an issue of Liver Transplantation, the official journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS).

From Eurekalert.org:

The normal course of treatment after liver transplantation includes calcineurin inhibitors (a class of immunosuppressants) and steroids to minimize rejection and improve survival rates, but the long-term complications of these drugs can be fatal. Steroid use in particular can lead to diabetes, high cholesterol and hypertension, which increase the risk of heart disease, and can lead to death. Several previous studies have reported that early withdrawal from steroids reduced the incidence of these side effects, but that rejection increased, although it could be controlled with steroid pulse therapy (in which high doses of steroids are administered intravenously for a short period of time). The current multicenter study was the first prospective double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare early steroid withdrawal with continued use.

Led by Georges-Philippe Pageaux, of the Centre Hospitalier University St.-Eloi in Montpellier, France, the study examined 174 patients in 15 French liver transplantation centers over a 14-month period from December 1999 to August 2001. The patients were randomly divided into two groups seven days following transplant: 90 of them continued to receive steroids for six months, while 84 received a placebo starting at day 14 (following 7 days of tapering from steroids). At the end of six months, 22 patients in the steroid group (24.4 percent) and 32 patients in the placebo group (38.1 percent) experienced acute rejection. Although there was no statistical difference in the two groups for high cholesterol and hypertension, 22.2 percent of patients in the steroid group developed diabetes compared with 14.3 percent of placebo patients. At the end of 12 months, the incidence of acute rejection was 25.6 percent in the steroid group versus 39.3 percent in the placebo group, but there no longer a difference in diabetes between the two groups.

The authors concluded that early steroid withdrawal at day 14 is not considered to be completely safe in terms of rejection but it was also found that it is efficient in terms of glucose tolerability.

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