Former Major League Baseball starting pitcher, William @Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed “The Rocket” and popularly known as Roger Clemens, was recently acquitted from all charges against him. The baseball player was facing one count of obstructing Congress, three counts of making false statements, and two counts of perjury.

Born on August 4, 1962 in Dayton (Ohio), Roger Clemens was drafted by the Boston Red Sox in the 1st round (19th pick) of the 1983 amateur draft. He made his Major League Baseball debut on May 15, 1984 and won seven Cy Young Awards (he won the AL award in 1986, 1987, 1991, 1997, 1998, and 2001, and the National League award in 2004), an MVP and two pitching triple crowns. The baseball player also won The Sporting News Pitcher of the Year Award five times, was named an All-Star 11 times, and won the All-Star MVP in 1986. He got his 1,000th strikeout as a Yankee on August 18, 2007 and is only the 9th player in MLB history to record 1,000 or more strikeouts with two different teams.

The verdict may have allowed Clemens to extend his long career as one of the greatest and most-decorated pitchers in baseball history, but the verdict was a clear blow to the legal pursuit by the government of athletes accused of illicit drug use. Moreover, the clean chit given to Clemens also raised questions on the purpose, credibility and execution of the Mitchell Report on steroid use in baseball that mentioned his name 82 times. In the report, former Yankees trainer Brian McNamee stated that he injected Roger Clemens with Winstrol (stanozolol) during the 1998, 2000, and 2001 baseball seasons.

60 Minutes Does a hit piece on Roger Clemens

The verdict also brought an end to the testifying of convicted drug dealer Kirk Radomski that he supplied human growth hormone to McNamee for a starting pitcher and even sent a shipment to house of Clemens. Radomski however had no ideas whether or not the HGH was specifically used on Roger Clemens. Debbie Clemens, Clemens’s wife, admitted that she received a human growth hormone injection from McNamee though the versions of both (Clemens and McNamee) differ over when the injection was administered and whether or not Roger Clemens was present at the time of HGH administration. The verdict also suggested that steroids actually work and they can be extremely beneficial to obliterate home run records or win gold medals.

It also indicates that steroid users are more likely to succeed and can still come out clean and sportsmen who do not take anabolic steroids would always find it difficult to compete against them.

The charges that Roger Clemens may have used anabolic steroids and human growth hormone during a career spanning 24 decades and producing 354 victories have been brought down by the verdict, but many still feel that he was not as clean as portrayed.

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