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Tuesday 25, Jul 2017

  Decision To Drug Test Schoolboy Rugby Players Appreciated By Former WADA Chief

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The decision of Drug Free Sport New Zealand to test schoolboy rugby players for the first time has kicked off a debate centered on ethics, social responsibility, and attitude.

David Howman, the former Director General of the World Anti-Doping Agency, welcomed the move to test leading Secondary School Rugby players of New Zealand. Howman remarked this is a very important initiative and added a lot of the problems in doping occur in the stages where young athletes are trying to break through into the elite nature and they are tempted to do that by others who should know better but a lot of doping goes on at that level.

The former WADA chief said he is really pleased at the initiative from DFSNZ and the willingness he thinks of the school principals to take this on. Howman also commented that the step taken by DFSNZ was a vital educational tool and deterrence.

The pioneering move will be hosted at the top four first XV finals series in Palmerston North during September. This decision was taken after concerns were expressed about the use of supplements by players, and whether banned substances are being used in the quest to reach the professional ranks.

Consent to testing will not be required from parents as the tournament is held under the auspices of New Zealand Rugby who are signatories to the World Anti-Doping Agency code. The urine samples will be collected and analyzed by the WADA-accredited laboratory in Sydney. School age athletes have long been tested by Drug Free Sport New Zealand in other sporting codes, such as Olympic or Paralympic events.

The anti-doping tests will be conducted for a restricted number of substances. The purpose of this initiative is to catch those who cheat in an attempt to reach the top level rather than someone who takes a medicine to help with health conditions such as asthma.

In a statement, Drug Free Sport New Zealand said the opportunity to apply for an exemption permitting the medical use is available in the rare event that a positive test results from properly administered medication. It was further said that normal results management process and sanction regime would be applied on a case-to-case basis. The statement of DFSNZ also reads that Drug Free Sport New Zealand had identified certain elements within the rugby environments of schools that possibly suggest a significant potential for doping to occur. It was commented that this includes research conducted by Otago University on behalf of DFSNZ showing extensive and uncontrolled supplement use, along with the knowledge that doping (and in particular anabolic steroid use) is occurring in comparable environments overseas, notably in South Africa and the United Kingdom.

The South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) reported in 2015 that nearly half of all doping convictions against rugby players over the 10 years up to 2014 came from the under-19 level and the country’s annual Craven Week schoolboys rugby tournament. SAIDS reported that the vast majority of positive tests of rugby players across all levels were for anabolic steroids.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Decision To Drug Test Schoolboy Rugby Players Appreciated By Former WADA Chief

Saturday 29, Apr 2017

  Bill To Ban Steroid Use By Racing Greyhounds

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The already-troubled racing greyhound industry is likely to face the worse with a bill banning anabolic steroid use by racing dogs.

Florida is one of just six states left in the United States that still allows active greyhound racing, but lawmakers may put an end to the race.

A new state bill that could stop the use of anabolic drugs is gaining speed these days to ensure the health and integrity of the racing greyhounds. A bill banning the use of anabolic steroids on racing greyhounds is about to make its way to the Florida House floor.

State Representative Carlos Guillermo Smith, the sponsor of the bill, remarked testosterone in Greyhound racing dogs can also serve as a performance enhancing drug. Smith added since greyhound racing is gambling and there is a certain word for that and it is called cheating and added this is why this bill has been brought forward so we can ban the use of harmful steroids and protect the integrity of the industry.

Jeff Kottkamp, former Lieutenant Governor who also represents the greyhound racing industry, remarked it is antithetical to think owners would harm a dog that must be in top racing condition. Kottkamp added frankly nobody cares about these animals than their owners.

Some animal activists are of the view that trainers are now taking extreme measures to prevent further loss, including using anabolic steroids on racing dogs. The use of steroids results in better performance and also helps keep female greyhounds from going into heat and not race. Female racing greyhounds are administered with testosterone twice a week in the form of a chewable tablet to keep them going into heat.

Carey Theil, the executive director of Grey2K, an organization working to protect greyhounds, has remarked greyhound racing is cruel and inhumane. Theil also commented that the use of anabolic steroids raises a major question about the integrity of the industry.

It is illegal to use steroids on racing dogs as per state regulators. However, the state does not check for the presence of these drugs when dogs are tested after a race.

Only 19 dog tracks remain in the United States and 12 of them are in Florida, including the Palm Beach County Kennel Club.

Fred Johnson, who works with the Florida Greyhound Association of Jacksonville, remarked a catastrophe would ensue without the ability to use steroids. Johnson said no one could stop if there is a fight with males trying to get over here to get to those females that you have 30 of them outside and 30 males.

Jack Cory, who represents the Florida Grey Hound association, said he does not see any point why anyone would want to stop dog owners from using the drug. Cory remarked birth control is birth control whether it is in a dog or a human being. And birth control methods have been used for a long time in this country—legally, honestly, and morally.

Animal rights activist Kate MacFall with the Humane Society of the United States on the other hand has remarked steroids are abusive to female greyhounds. MacFall said for the female dogs it gives them male parts over time.

Greyhound owners have long stopped using drugs in other countries to keep their female dogs from going into heat.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Bill To Ban Steroid Use By Racing Greyhounds

Monday 04, May 2015

  Texas Lawmakers To End High School Steroid Testing Program

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Texas Lawmakers To End High School Steroid Testing Program

The Texas state legislature will soon on whether random drug testing of high school athletes should find a place in the state budget. Recent reports suggest that the $3 million annual outlay that was approved by legislators eight years ago is all set to end.

The Texas legislature approved funding for the program in 2007 after reports across North Texas of anabolic steroid use among high school athletes, most notably in the Dallas-Fort Worth suburbs of Colleyville and Plano. Random testing began during the second semester of the 2007-08 school year with 0.26 percent testing positive. Following similar results, funding was cut a year later to $1 million and then to the current $650,000 in 2011-12.

The bill was recommended by the staff of the legislature’s Sunset Advisory Commission that is charged with elimination of unnecessary spending in state government. Results of the testing during its 5½ years cast doubt on whether it’s worth even the current annual expenditure of $650,000, said Commission director Ken Levine. According to the commission staff’s report, less than one-third of 1 percent of subjects testing positive (190 out of 62,892) at a cost of $9.3 million and funding has steadily declined from an annual $3 million to about $650,000 this year.

School Year  Budget  Tests

% Schools

% Students

Pos

% Pos

Spring 2008 $3M 10,117

1.3

15

26

0.26

2008-09 $3M 35,077

4.5

46

125

0.36

2009-10 $1M 6,441

0.83

30

9

0.14

2010-11 $1M 4,595

0.59

21

8

0.17

2011-12 $650,000 3,311

0.42

15

11

0.33

2012-13 $650,000 3,351

0.41

14

11

0.34

TOTAL $9.3M 62,892

1.34*

23.5*

190

0.27*

Source: Sunset Advisory Committee staff report, August 2014
* – Avg

Ken Levine remarked recommendation of the commission staff is split between determining the problem is not as serious as previously thought and assuming that the test as administered cannot provide a reliable snapshot of the situation. Levine added it may not be a good investment of funds at this time and also remarked that we said in the report that the world of steroid use and other performance enhancing drugs has changed a lot since they originally implemented this.

New Jersey was the first state to administer statewide tests for performance enhancing drugs to high school athletes in 2005-06. Soon, Texas and Illinois joined. Florida tested in 2008-09 and brought an end to its program after only one academic year, finding one positive among approximately 600 tests.

Steroid testing proponents agree the Texas steroid testing program would not deliver many positives and cited inadequacies in procedure and scope of the program. Don Hooton, whose Taylor Hooton Foundation has been offering anti-steroid education to young athletes for 12 years, said it was never about measuring the amount of performance enhancing drug usage by the kids and added it was all about providing deterrents. Don Hooton added he believes Texas should reallocate the testing money for anti-steroid education and commented that we are dealing with a political climate that doesn’t believe this is a problem with the kids.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Texas Lawmakers To End High School Steroid Testing Program

Sunday 22, Apr 2012

  Steroids bust for jailed Olympian

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Nathan Baggaley, the disgraced Australian Olympic medalist, has been charged with possessing steroids in jail.

The Olympian was already serving a nine-year jail term with a non-parole period of five years for dealing in ecstasy.

The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Agency busted Baggaley for anabolic steroid use in 2005.

Saturday 17, Mar 2012

  Pitcher with unusual drug test suspended

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Dustin Richardson, the 26-year-old left-handed pitcher, has been suspended for 50 games, after he tested positive for five different drugs, a result that a spokesperson for Major League Baseball recognized was “unusual.”

“I’ve never seen a case like this, and we’re talking about 30 years I’ve been doing this kind of work,” said Don Catlin, an anti-doping expert and former director of the U.C.L.A. Olympic Analytical Laboratory.

“I’ve had doublets and triplets, but to have five, and have it cover three different subclasses of drugs, is unique, as far as I can tell,” Catlin added.

Wednesday 22, Feb 2012

  Pitcher found abusing five banned substances

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Dustin Richardson, the 26-year-old left-handed pitcher, had tested positive and been suspended for 50 games, a result that a spokesman for Major League Baseball acknowledged was “unusual.”

“I’ve never seen a case like this, and we’re talking about 30 years I’ve been doing this kind of work,” said Don Catlin, an anti-doping expert and former director of the U.C.L.A. Olympic Analytical Laboratory.

“I’ve had doublets and triplets, but to have five, and have it cover three different subclasses of drugs, is unique, as far as I can tell,” Catlin added.

Thursday 01, Dec 2011

  Drugs ban hit SA boxing champion

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After testing positive for anabolic steroids, SA featherweight champion Matima Molefe has been banned for two years by the SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport.

The urine sample of Molefe that was taken by the institute’s officials on May 29 this year after a title fight in East London had illegal substances.

Galant added, “Boxing combines high-level co-ordination of gross motor skills with speed and strength. By focusing on illegal performance gains from steroids and ignoring the consequences that a doping ban can have, boxers are placing their championship status and earning potential at risk.”

Wednesday 17, Aug 2011

  Steroid use among female high school students

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Steroid use among female high school studentsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 7 percent of ninth-grade girls reported ever using anabolic steroids in 2004, according to results of a national survey published in the June issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Dramatic increases in the prevalence of teen girls using steroids during the 1990s by three national surveys.

“Adolescent girls reporting anabolic steroid use had significantly more other health-harming behaviors,” the authors write.

Monday 28, Feb 2011

  Disgraced Olympian charged with possessing steroids

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Disgraced Olympian charged with possessing steroids Nathan Baggaley, the disgraced Australian Olympic medalist, has been charged with possessing steroids in jail. The Olympic medalist was already serving a nine-year jail term with a non-parole period of five years for dealing in ecstasy.

The three-time kayaking world champion and double Olympic silver medalist was charged with “possession of a prescribed restricted substance (steroids)” while serving his time in Cessnock Correctional Centre.

Baggaley has subsequently been moved to Silverwater Metropolitan Remand and Reception Centre and will appear in Cessnock court on July 21.

Monday 21, Feb 2011

  Market for home based steroid diagnostic test among worried parents

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Market for home based steroid diagnostic test among worried parentsAn explosion of anabolic steroid use among teen boys has opened up a new market for worried parents desiring to find out whether their children are using the drugs.

A home-based steroid diagnostic test costing $200 is about to be launched in Australia amid claims that as many as one in 20 high school students in Queensland have used steroids to keep up the idea of looking buffed.

The steroid detector has been developed by the same US-based company that launched the popular HairConfirm that launches a probe into cocaine, marijuana, and other drugs.

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