25/01/2020 10:34 am Welcome to isteroids.com - BLOG

Wednesday 06, Apr 2011

  Olympic gold medalist falls to disgrace

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Olympic gold medalist falls to disgraceAntonio Pettigrew, a gold medalist in Olympic 4x400m relay, has entered into the disgrace zone by admitting that he took performance enhancing drugs.

Pettigrew is presently working in the capacity of an assistant track coach at the University of North Carolina. He never tested positive during his career in which he conquered World Championship gold over 400m in 1991 and world relay gold in 1997, 1999, and 2001.

Heredia recalled an incident during prosecution testimony in which Graham asked him to send by overnight mail a cocktail of EPO, human growth hormone, and insulin for the disgraced Marion Jones.

Monday 14, Mar 2011

  British quartet will receive gold medals

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

British quartet will receive gold medalsThe 4x400metres relay squad from Great Britain will finally be receiving gold medals due to them from the 1997 World Championship. This announcement was made after American Antonio Pettigrew confessed to drug violations.

The decision to annul the USA’s victory at the championships in Athens was taken by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).

The IAAF announcement came after Pettigrew confessed to using banned substances for a period of six years.

Friday 11, Mar 2011

  Pettigrew admits to performance enhancing drugs

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Pettigrew admits to performance enhancing drugsOlympic 4x400m relay gold medalist, Antonio Pettigrew, recently admitted to using performance enhancing drugs.

Pettigrew is presently an assistant track coach at the University of North Carolina. He never tested positive during a track career that also earned him World Championship gold over 400m in 1991 and world relay gold in 1997, 1999, and 2001.

During three hours of testimony for the prosecution, Heredia recalled one instance when Graham asked him to send by overnight mail a cocktail of EPO, human growth hormone, and insulin for Marion Jones.

Tuesday 08, Mar 2011

  Former 400m world champion found dead

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Former 400m world champion found deadAntonio Pettigrew, the former 400m world champion, has been found dead in the backseat of his car in North Carolina. The cause of his death is unknown by now but Major Gary Blankenship, of the Chatham County sheriff’s office, said the car was locked and there was evidence that the 42-year-old had taken sleeping pills.

Body of Pettigrew has been taken for an autopsy but toxicology results are not expected back for at least four weeks.

The University of North Carolina, the employer of Pettigrew, had earlier released a statement confirming the news.

Wednesday 14, Jul 2010

  Doping admitted by Olympic Medalist

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Doping admitted by Olympic MedalistA member of the gold medal winning US 4 X 400m relay team has admitted that the he used performance enhancing drugs during the Sydney 2000 Olympics.

Antonio Pettigrew admitted using performance enhancers and the admission can mean that gold medals won by fellow relay team members Alvin and Calvin Harrison are also in jeopardy.

Pettigrew’s admission came during a testimony in the trial of Trevor Graham, his former coach, who is accused of hiding the truth to federal authorities investigating doping in sports.

Monday 01, Sep 2008

  Antonio Pettigrew keeps coaching post despite steroid use admission

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Antonio Pettigrew steroidsAll is not lost for Antonio Pettigrew.

The 2000 Olympic gold medalist in men’s 4×400 meter relay will continue to coach student athletes at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. The institution has decided to keep the disgraced Pettigrew as an assistant coach in men’s and women’s track and field.

Pettigrew lost his gold medal when he admitted in a federal court that he had used performance-enhancing drugs. He, along with his 2000 Olympic teammates, was officially disqualified by the International Olympic Committee on August 2 and was asked to return his gold medal. Pettigrew, however, had earlier volunteered to give up his medal in June.

Baddour says UNC has one of the most stringent anti-steroid policies in all of amateur sports and that Pettigrew, who had used drugs before coming to UNC, had never encouraged the use of banned substances by UNC athletes.

“I deeply appreciate the second chance the University of North Carolina is giving me,” Pettigrew said in a prepared statement. ” … I promise to work hard not only as track coach but as a person who will dedicate myself to teaching young men and women to make the right decisions and to know that there are no shortcuts when it comes to competition, training and integrity.”

Pettigrew appeared before a federal court in May this year when he was subpoenaed by prosecutors to testify in Trevor Graham’s steroid trial. Graham was a former coach of Pettigrew and other prominent track athletes, including Marion Jones and her former husband C.J. Hunter. Graham was subsequently found guilty of committing perjury to federal authorities during their investigation of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative in Burlingame, California.

Pettigrew, who never failed a drug test, admitted in his testimony that he had used the blood booster erythropoietin and human growth hormone in the period before, during and after the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. Three of his teammates, however, had figured in doping violations before.

Twins Alvin and Calvin Harrison were suspended due to doping infringements. Jerome Young, another team member, was banned for life in 2004 from track and field for testing positive for banned compounds twice.

Pettigrew has been with the UNC coaching staff since 2006.

The BALCO incident is considered as the biggest steroid scandal in U.S. history. It involved preeminent Olympic and professional athletes, including star players of Major League Baseball and National Football League. This scandal prompted Congressional hearings on use of steroids and other banned substances in MLB. Several well-known sluggers were implicated, including Jason Giambi and Barry Bonds.

Legislators said the main motivation for the series of hearing was to stop the rising use of steroid use among young Americans.
“Kids are dying from the use of steroids. They’re looking up to these major league leaders in terms of the enhancements that they’re using. And we have to stop it,” said Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Calif) in an interview on March 13, 2005 on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

Wednesday 06, Aug 2008

  IOC officially disqualifies US relay team due to steroid and PEDs use

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

sydney-olympics-steroidsThe disqualification of the United States 1,600-meter relay team comes four years after the team’s victory at that Olympic event in Sydney. The International Olympic Committee officially issued the disqualification on Saturday after Antonio Pettigrew, a member of the said team, publicly admitted steroids and PEDs.

The entire team is required to give back its gold medals to the United State Olympic Committee which will be turned over to the IOC offices in Switzerland.

The New York Times reports:

The International Olympic Committee officially disqualified on Saturday sprinter Antonio Pettigrew and his entire United States 1,600-meter relay team from the 2000 Sydney Games because Pettigrew admitted using performance-enhancing drugs at those Olympics.

Pettigrew, who never failed a drug test, admitted in May to using the blood booster EPO and human growth hormone before, during and after the 2000 Olympics. He returned his medal in June.

His teammates — Michael Johnson, Angelo Taylor, Jerome Young and the twins Alvin and Calvin Harrison — will also lose their medals. Johnson, a three-time Olympic gold medalist in individual events, voluntarily gave up his relay gold medal in July.

“We fully support the action taken today by the I.O.C.,” Darryl Seibel, spokesman for the U.S.O.C, said. “Athletes must understand that if they make the choice to cheat, there will be consequences and those consequences can be severe.”

At a news conference on Saturday, Giselle Davies, spokeswoman for the I.OC., said the board would wait on that decision, so they could see if any more information comes out of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative steroids case.

Some of Pettigrew’s teammates have already been swept up in doping scandals of their own.

Alvin and Calvin Harrison have both served suspensions from the sport for violating doping rules. Young was barred for life.

Antonio Pettigrew’s admission took place when he was subpoenaed to testify in the trial of his former coach Trevor Graham in May this year. Graham was subsequently found guilty of lying to federal investigators during their investigation stemming from the BALCO Affair.

In his testimony, Pettigrew admitted that he had used steroids and PEDs as far back as 1997.

His statements surprised many, including his co-winner Michael Johnson, since he was never tested positive for any banned compound.

Johnson had given up his gold medal right after Pettigrew’s testimony. He said he felt ‘betrayed’ with Pettigrew’s admission.

Pettigrew has been retired from the track since 2002.

Sunday 22, Jun 2008

  Steroid use in sports

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

First, it was the sentencing of David Jacobs on May 1. This former Plano bodybuilder was slapped with three year’s probation and a monetary fine of $25,000 for conspiring to possess with intent to distribute anabolic steroids. Two other co-conspirators were sentenced along Jacobs. The other four co-defendants are still awaiting their sentencing.

Jacobs was the ring leader of the Texas-based steroid distribution network. Based on his confession, he had supplied anabolic steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs to NFL players. He said he sold steroids and human growth hormone directly to NFL offensive lineman Matt Lehr and another NPL player. The players, in turn, supplied said compounds to a handful of NFL players.

Then the trial of controversial track coach Trevor Graham. Graham was found guilty of lying to federal authorities regarding his relationship with Heredia, a self-confessed steroid dealer and user. Heredia has testified that he had supplied Graham performance-enhancing drugs, including steroids, to the latter’s Sprint Capitol track team. During the trial, several names were mentioned by Heredia. Heredia said he provided steroids and other banned substances directly or through Graham to high-profile athletes, such as Marion Jones, Tim Montgomery, and Antonio Pettigrew.

Major League Baseball has also been rocked by steroid scandals. Jose Canseco, Barry Bonds, Sammy Sosa, and Mark McGwire’s careers have been tainted by use of steroids and other banned substances.

What are steroids and why is their use so rampant in sports?

Steroids are synthetic substances similar to the male sex hormone testosterone. They do have legitimate medical uses; they are used in treatment of diverse conditions such as anemia, HIV-related symptoms, and hypogonadism. The term steroids, however, became a household term because of their use as physique- and performance-enhancing drugs.
There are many studies and anecdotal reports that steroids are capable of boosting both the physique and performance of an athlete. Pettigrew, for example, in his testimony in the trial of his former coach has acknowledged that once he started taking banned substances, he was able to run 400 meters in the 43-second range for the first time. “I was running incredible times as I was preparing for track meets,” he said. “I was able to recover faster.”

Saturday 21, Jun 2008

  Sprinter gives up medal due to steroid scandal

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Michael Johnson steroidsMichael Johnson felt he did not deserve the gold medal, and thus he decided to give it up. Johnson came to such a difficult decision after Antonio Pettigrew, his teammate at the 1600-meter relay in 2000 Sydney Olympics, publicly confessed that he used steroids. The US team took home the gold in that event.

“As difficult as it is, I will be returning it to the International Olympic Committee because I don’t want it,” Johnson, the former Baylor superstar, wrote in a column in Daily Telegraph in London. “I feel cheated, betrayed and let down.”

The gold medal is one of five Johnson won in his impressive career. He still holds the world record in the 200 and 400 meters. Pettigrew’s testimony means that three of the four runners in the finals on the US relay team have been tainted by use of steroids and other performance boosters.

Twins Alvin and Calvin Harrison, the other two members of the four-man team, were suspended for doping violations. Alvin Harrison accepted a four-year ban in 2004 after admitting he used performance enhancers. Calvin Harrison tested positive for a banned stimulant in 2003 and was suspended for two years. Like Pettigrew, the twins were coached by Graham.

Pettigrew was subpoenaed to testify in the trial of his longtime coach Trevor Graham. Angel ‘Memo’ Heredia, the steroid dealer turned prosecution witness, has mentioned several of Graham’s elite track athletes including Pettigrew, whom he said he supplied with steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs. Pettigrew’s name came as a surprise since he never tested positive for steroid use.

“The news that Antonio was scheduled to testify to having taken performance-enhancing drugs shocked me like no other drug-related story,” Johnson wrote upon learning of Pettigrew’s subpoenaed testimony. “…He was someone I considered a friend.”
During his testimony on May 22 in a San Francisco district court, Pettigrew acknowledged that he had used banned substances as far back as 1997. Graham was found guilty on one count to lying to federal investigators during their inquiry into the BALCO steroid scandal.

Thursday 19, Jun 2008

  Olympic winner gives up medal due to steroid use

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Antonio PettigrewHe used to be in the Hall of Fame, now Antonio Pettigrew seems to belong in the Hall of Shame. This came about after he publicly admitted that he used steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs in his testimony in the trial of his former tack coach Trevor Graham.

During last month’s trial, Pettigrew came clean about using banned substances erythropoietin (EPO) and human growth hormone from 1997 to 2003. Both compounds are believed to enhance the performance of athletes who use them. In his testimony, Pettigrew said that once he started taking banned substances, he was able to run 400 meters in the 43-second range for the first time. “I was running incredible times as I was preparing for track meets,” he said. “I was able to recover faster.”

Graham was found guilty of lying to federal investigators about his relationship to a steroid dealer. The steroid dealer, Angel Heredia, is the prosecution’s star witness in the trial against Graham. It was Heredia who mentioned the names of several athletes, including Pettigrew, whom he said he supplied with steroids and other illegal drugs.

Pettigrew’s decision to give up his gold medal for the 1600-meter relay, including all the other awards he had won since 1997, did not surprise many. His co-winner in said event, Michael Johnson, has also decided to give up his medal after Pettigrew’s testimony. Johnson said he felt ‘cheated, betrayed, and let down’ because of Pettigrew’s admission to steroid use.

The other two members of the relay team, twins Alvin and Calvin Harrison, are still holding on to their medals. The twins, however, have already been suspended for steroid use. Alvin Harrison accepted a four-year ban in 2004 after admitting he used steroids and other illegal substances. Calvin Harrison tested positive for a banned stimulant in 2003 and was suspended for two years. Like Pettigrew, both were coached by Graham.

Travis Tygart approved of Pettigrew’s decision. “It takes courage to accept full responsibility for such egregious conduct, and hopefully, Mr. Pettigrew’s case will serve as another powerful reminder to young athletes of the importance of competing clean,” Tygart said. Tygart is the chief executive officer of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, which handled Pettigrew’s case.

The 40-year-old Pettigrew is currently an assistant track coach at North Carolina University. He was also penalized with a two-year ban from track. This penalty, however, was seen as largely symbolic move since he’s retired from track since 2002.

Next »