12/04/2021 3:13 am Welcome to isteroids.com - BLOG

Sunday 16, Jun 2013

  UCI-Lance ‘Collusion’ To Be Studied By Panel

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

UCI-Lance ‘Collusion’ To Be Studied By Panel

UCI President Pat McQuaid has announced that an independent panel will be examining allegations that the UCI, the world governing body of cycling, was complicit in Lance Armstrong‘s doping.

Senior officials from UCI and the World Anti-Doping Agency will meet in Russia to discuss potential appointments to an expert panel of three members, according to McQuaid, who added that long-standing claims about the UCI and relationship with Lance Armstrong will be absolutely addressed by the commission. The collusion allegations include suspicious test results at the 1999 Tour de France and 2001 Tour of Switzerland, plus cash donations to UCI totaling $125,000 from the disgraced seven-time Tour de France winner.

In an interview, McQuaid said he would be very sure that the audit will show that there’s nothing untoward ever been done with Armstrong. Meanwhile, six critically important points were reported in a report by consultants Deloitte that was commissioned by the UCI to consult cycling stakeholders and fans after the Armstrong scandal. After processing 6,369 survey responses and conducting a series of working groups, Deloitte said the world governing body of cycling should act quickly and clearly in deciding how to investigate historic doping cases that could involve offering amnesty to riders and officials. Deloitte said in a report summary published by the UCI that any ultimate decision should be made only after consultation with WADA and USADA; the 12-page document didn’t mention the name of Lance Armstrong.

The UCI appears to be rebuilding relations with the United States Anti-Doping Authority and McQuaid, who met USADA chief executive Travis Tygart recently in Brussels, said the UCI and WADA-accredited labs were searching their archives for information about laboratory results of urine and blood samples given by Armstrong during his career.

The UCI and USADA have met on a regular basis since committing in January to an independent audit of the UCI’s anti-doping program and decision-making during the period of Lance’s career, McQuaid said. A previously-appointed commission that was investigating if the leaders of UCI protected Armstrong from scrutiny during his 1999-2005 run of Tour de France wins was closed by the UCI president in January this year and the latest, independent panel that is expected to take shape in St. Petersburg, on the sidelines of an Olympic gathering attended by UCI director general Christophe Hubschmid and WADA counterpart David Howman, is likely to include two officials experienced in anti-doping science and sports law.

McQuaid said the UCI will maintain that any decisions we took at the time were taken within the rules at the time, with all the knowledge we had at the time and experts in this field who therefore know what they are looking for, and what they are looking at and understand all the files they will be reading. After a scheduled June 12-13 meeting of the UCI’s management board in Bergen, Norway, their audit report is expected within several months and McQuaid said we will discuss what further measures we need to take in relation to looking at the past and dealing with the past.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: UCI-Lance ‘Collusion’ To Be Studied By Panel

Thursday 14, Feb 2013

  UCI And Anti-Doping Expert Clash Over Disgraced Cyclist

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

UCI And Anti-Doping Expert Clash Over Disgraced Cyclist

The question of whether or not disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong doped during his comeback has sparked a dispute between the world governing body of cycling and anti-doping expert and Australian scientist, Michael Ashenden.

While Armstrong recently said in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that he did not use banned performance enhancing drugs during his comeback, the United States Anti-Doping Agency ruled there was a strong probability that he cheated during his comeback from 2009 to early 2011. Ashenden is very much convinced that the test values of Lance Armstrong showed he doped during the comeback and this has what led to several clashes in the media between the UCI, which is in damage control following the Armstrong scandal, and the anti-doping expert.

The Australian scientist served on the UCI panel that reviewed the biological passport data of professional riders, but resigned last year. In a media statement, Ashenden said McQuaid has been deceitful and deliberately misled the public and the media about the suspicious blood values of the banned cyclist during his comeback in 2009 and 2010 and added that the world governing body of cycling have been forced to admit that they never sent his suspicious blood values to their expert panel for the examination. Ashenden claimed doping exper

ts were only given nine of 38 blood tests provided by the Texan rider during his Tour de France comeback years of 2009 and 2010 and questioned why the world cycling body failed to pass on all tests.

Ashenden added that the world cycling body were derelict in their obligations to faithfully run the passport program if they fail to examine the raw data of Lance Armstrong when he placed third at the 2009 Tour de France. He went on to remark that the UCI was “biologically illiterate” if it had examined Armstrong’s test results from the 2009 Tour and did not see evidence of a possible blood transfusion. The UCI, on the other hand, claimed that it was Ashenden himself who cleared the blood profile of the banned cyclist before the 2009 Tour though it admits that the profile of the cyclist was never submitted to the expert panel for analysis after May 4, 2009 – two months before the Tour de France.

Ashenden does not understand the protocols of the testing process, the UCI remarked and added that his concerns are unfounded.

In another development, Hein Verbruggen, who was president of cycling’s governing body when the disgraced cyclist won his seven Tour de France titles, attacked WADA and denied he aided any cover-up of Armstrong’s doping. He added that there was simply nothing to cover-up as Armstrong, nor his teammates, never tested positive. Verbruggen, who ran the International Cycling Union (UCI) for 14 years and remains its honorary president, was deeply critical of WADA and anti-doping officials in the US and France for their failure to expose the cyclist during his career. The UCI honorary president brought forward his side of the story by delivering letters to International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge and 14 other Olympic executive board members by hand at the Lausanne Palace Hotel where they have been holding a meeting of two days.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: UCI And Anti-Doping Expert Clash Over Disgraced Cyclist

Tuesday 13, Nov 2012

  Team Sky Policy Attacked By WADA Chief

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Team Sky Policy Attacked By WADA Chief

Team Sky has been criticized by David Howman, the World Anti-Doping Agency chief executive, for their zero-tolerance approach to drug-taking. Howman said cycling cannot afford to lose those who knew about doping in the sport as it makes an attempt to clean up its act.

The WADA Chief said the hardline stance of Team Sky will not encourage riders and officials with a history of performance enhancing drugs to divulge evidence because of a fear they will lose their job. Howman added that there will not be many who will reveal the truth if they fear about losing their jobs and said zero tolerance does not make much of a sense in the overall efforts of cleaning up cycling. He further added that WADA in general is concerned as we are losing people who knew about doping and what all happened and we should actually make them feel free to come forward and said if they have a fear of losing their positions, that will be a regrettable loss of opportunity to clean the sport.

Team Sky race coach, Bobby Julich, and directeur sportif Steven de Jongh have left the team after they admitted to having a history of performance enhancing drugs.

Meanwhile, the Australian Olympic Committee is introducing a statutory declaration and oath for all its team members wherein anyone who is found to have lied on oath could be jailed for up to seven years. Howman said: “I would like to see another step before that, more of the carrot and less of the stick.”

When the team was first established in 2009, riders and officials signed initial team contracts that contained “protections and remedies that would be expected” in relation to doping, Team Sky said and added that after the recent reaffirmation process that offered a payment to those who confessed and left the team, the organization believes the team is clean.

Fahey added that those in charge of cycling at the time of Armstrong scandal should bear some of the responsibility and added that “everybody doped” in cycling during the Lance Armstrong era. Twenty six people, including 11 former teammates of Lance Armstrong, testified before the USADA that the disgraced cyclist and his team made use of trafficked in banned drugs and also made use of blood transfusions, and Lance pressured others to do so.

Fahey added that cycling will be able to regain credibility only after the senior officials on watch during the “debacle” were removed so that its millions of supporters around the world will watch and support the sport going forward and said anyone involved during the Armstrong years could not justify their place in the hierarchy of the sport at the UCI. The WADA Chief said he looks forward to seeing what the UCI proposes to do to ensure the Armstrong “debacle” does not happen again.

UCI president Pat McQuaid, who has held the position since 2006, meanwhile warned against blaming authorities of the sport for the doping scandal; his predecessor Hein Verbruggen was at the helm during Armstrong’s reign.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Team Sky Policy Attacked By WADA Chief

Thursday 08, Nov 2012

  Independence A Must For Clean Sport, Says Tygart

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Independence A Must For Clean Sport, Says Tygart

 USADA CEO Travis Tygart has said that the work is not done yet even though the lifetime ban and the disqualification of the results of Lance Armstrong are now secure.

The arbitration cases for Johan Bruyneel and Jose “Pepe” Martí are still lying in pending status and there is a huge possibility that more details may emerge from the seedy tale of the doping culture in cycling. Tygart, after unearthing the disturbing truths, sees independent organizations like USADA as the only way forward for the sport.

At times when the governing body of cycling was turning a blind eye to whistle-blowers such as Jörg Jaksche, Tyler Hamilton, and Floyd Landis, the United States Anti-Doping Agency was taking them seriously and started investigating on the allegations made by the former teammates of Lance Armstrong against him. Tygart said the reason why the cycling’s governing body failed to do so sooner was because of the inherent conflict of interest or “fox guarding the henhouse” that is key to cycling’s problems.

USADA chief said if a single precedent is established by the case of the disgraced cyclist, Armstrong, it is that clean athletes have now greater faith in the anti-doping establishments and trust that these institutions will not turn a blind eye, irrespective of how powerful or influential those who broke the rules may be. He added that the UCI was arguing and telling everyone that USADA was on a witch hunt and they seem to have no idea of what the evidence was, they sued Floyd Landis and called the whistle-blowers scum bags, these surely are not the actions one takes if the sport is to be moved in the right direction on this topic.

The differences between USADA and UCI emerged in public ahead of the 2011 Tour of California when the governing body of cycling said it wants the absolute results management authority and could only allow USADA to simply perform the controls. In 2010, a similar conflict happened between the UCI and French Anti-Doping Agency (AFLD) before the Tour de France. Meanwhile, the management committee of the UCI has decided to form an independent commission for examining the “various allegations made about UCI relating to the Armstrong affair” but the USADA chief hopes the scope will be broader than just looking into a few important issues like the 2001 Tour de Suisse doping control of Lance Armstrong that was suspicious for EPO.

Tygart added that the USADA report into the Lance Armstrong doping scandal did to some extent what the Mitchell Report did for baseball. The report by USADA not only had a look into and exposed the past, but it also helped in learning lessons that one can unshackle himself from that past besides placing tangible recommendations to ensure the sport moves in the right direction. Tygart expressed hope that USADA, their equivalents around the world, and WADA itself, have demonstrated that they could offer a reasonable avenue for clean athletes to report on doping activities and said Armstrong scandal will surely send a very powerful deterrent and preventative message to those who cheat and think that they could get away with it or grow so big they become too big to fail.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Independence A Must For Clean Sport, Says Tygart