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Wednesday 28, Jul 2010

  Short steroid therapy effective after asthma attack

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Short steroid therapy effective after asthma attackThe chances of an asthma attack relapsing are reduced significantly when patients afflicted with asthma are given a short course of corticosteroids after they are discharged from the hospital, according to a Cochrane Systematic Review.

It was remarked by Carol Spooner, a colleague, that this review strongly supports the administration of systematic corticosteroids for treating outpatients after getting them discharged from the hospital post an asthma attack.

It was concluded by the review that use of steroids could possibly minimize the need of inhalers and may even prove effective for prolonging lives by as much as three weeks.

Tuesday 27, Jul 2010

  Hospital readmission cause in newborns could be predicted

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Hospital readmission cause in newborns could be predictedTwo separate studies conducted at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics have revealed that physicians could prevent complications in context to newborns and relieve worries of parents via genetic testing. This form of testing can be used for making advance predictions as to which all newborns would be requiring hospital readmission shortly after birth.

This research was led by Bridgette L. Jones, MD, allergy, asthma and immunology and clinical pharmacology specialist, and Carrie A. Vyhlidal, PhD, research scientist, pediatric clinical pharmacology, at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, and a separate study was conducted by researchers at Children’s Mercy.

Results of these studies are likely to help physicians for identifying which all of their young patients are expected to respond well or not to therapy involving steroids for treating asthma.

Wednesday 21, Jul 2010

  Patients with asthma are prone to other ailments

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Patients with asthma are prone to other ailmentsSinusitis is a severe health complication affecting approximately 37 million individuals in the United States alone and a big majority of this population is also affected by asthma, which is a disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction.

A study was conducted to examine sinusitis symptom variations noticed by asthmatics and non-asthmatic population also suffering from sinusitis. The authors of “The Incidence and the Effect of Asthma on Consecutive Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis,” were Melanie W. Seybt MD, Kevin C. McMains MD, and Stilianos E. Kountakis MD PhD, all with the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA.

Findings of the study were presented at the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO, at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York City, NY.

Friday 09, Jul 2010

  Relief possible with corticosteroids after asthma attack

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Relief possible with corticosteroids after asthma attackThe risk of an asthma attack relapsing is minimized to a significant extent when affected patients are administered with a short course of corticosteroids after being discharged from the hospital post-attack, according to a Cochrane Systematic Review.

The review disclosed that administration of steroids to asthmatic patients could considerably reduce the use of inhalers; it was revealed that such benefits can last for as long as three weeks.

Carol Spooner, the review colleague, remarked that the systematic review strongly endorses the use of systematic corticosteroids to treat outpatients after getting discharged from the hospital after asthma attack.

Wednesday 07, Jul 2010

  Asthma patients are prone to other diseases

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Asthma patients are prone to other diseasesNearly 37 million people in the United States alone are afflicted with sinusitis and a big part of this patient population is also affected with asthma, an inflammatory disease of the lungs which is characterized by reversible airway obstruction.

In order to ascertain the differences in symptoms of sinusitis experienced by asthmatics versus non-asthmatics, a study was entailed. The authors of “The Incidence and the Effect of Asthma on Consecutive Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis,” were Melanie W. Seybt MD, Kevin C. McMains MD, and Stilianos E. Kountakis MD PhD, all with the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA.

The findings were presented at the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO, at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York City, NY.

Wednesday 07, Jul 2010

  Potential treatment for hay fever and asthma identified

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Potential treatment for hay fever and asthma identifiedA potential drug has been identified and about to undergo trials in humans for treating hay fever and asthma.

The drug, RPL554, apparently has the ability to effectively treat respiratory diseases and does not lead to side effects that are usually common characteristics of many of the currently used medications.

It was remarked by Dr. Clive Page, chairman of Verona Pharma, which is developing the treatment, that his company is also ascertaining other novel compounds to tackle respiratory diseases on the lines of anti-inflammatory substances found in starfish and a treatment for coughs.

Tuesday 29, Jun 2010

  Asthma may effect black teens more than the whites

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Asthma may effect black teens more than the whitesBlack teenagers are more likely to develop steroid-resistant asthma than their white counterparts, according to a research conducted at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center.

It was disclosed in the study that black asthmatic teens are more likely to be sick and suffer from a higher mortality rate than white teens with asthma.

African-American children are prone to steroid-resistant asthma, according to Joseph Spahn, M.D., a pediatric allergist and director of the Immunopharmacology Lab at National Jewish.

The study was published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Saturday 26, Jun 2010

  Steroid dose increase or combination useful for asthmatic children

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Steroid dose increase or combination useful for asthmatic childrenAccording to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine and other institutions, young children with asthma can be treated in a better way by increasing doses of steroids or adding more drugs to the asthma therapy.

Results of this study have implications to help medical practitioners to predict which all of the available treatment options will help their patients the most.

Robert C. Strunk, M.D., and Leonard B. Bacharier, M.D., both Washington University pediatric asthma specialists at St. Louis Children’s Hospital were co-authors for this study.

The study was published online March 2, 2010, by the New England Journal of Medicine and presented the same day at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology’s annual meeting in New Orleans.

Monday 21, Jun 2010

  Inhaled corticosteroids superior to Sodium Cromoglycate

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Inhaled corticosteroids superior to Sodium CromoglycateAsthma management is easy and effective with inhaled corticosteroids when compared with sodium cromoglycate besides helping in normal functioning of the lungs, as per a study.

The dominance of inhaled corticosteroids increase with moderate low doses when compared to low doses, according to Dr James Guevara, Department of Pediatrics at the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine in Philadelphia and lead review author of this study.

It was concluded by Dr Guevara that inhaled corticosteroids are a better option for asthmatic patients than sodium cromoglycate when it comes managing the disease.

Monday 21, Jun 2010

  Asthma patients get extended relief with inhaled steroids

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Asthma patients get extended relief with inhaled steroidsAdults and children afflicted with asthma can exercise better control over the disease with inhaled corticosteroids than with cromolyn, according to a study conducted by James Guevara, M.D., of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and colleagues.

The researchers made comparisons between inhaled corticosteroids and cromolyn to find the better between the two for providing relief to patients with asthma.

It was revealed by the study that adults and children with asthma and treated with inhaled steroids experienced three fewer severe asthma flare-ups each year on an average and made less use of asthma inhalers when compared to asthma patients treated with cromolyn.

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