07/12/2019 3:37 am Welcome to isteroids.com - BLOG

Friday 04, Feb 2011

  Budesonide could replace Prednisone for autoimmune hepatitis

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Budesonide could replace Prednisone for autoimmune hepatitisDr. Michael P. Manns and his colleagues said in an article appearing in the October issue of Gastroenterology that a combination of budesonide plus azathioprine achieves and maintains remission of autoimmune hepatitis as well as standard prednisone therapy does, while sparing patients many of the adverse effects of steroids.

Dr. Manns of Hannover (Germany) Medical School and his associates compared the safety and efficacy of the budesonide combination with the standard therapy of prednisone with azathioprine.

From Internalmedicinenews.com:

In the first phase of the study, 208 patients aged 10-70 years were randomly assigned to receive budesonide (103 subjects) or prednisone (105 subjects) with azathioprine for 6 months. Budesonide was given in 3-mg oral doses three times daily, a regimen that was decreased to twice daily if remission occurred. Prednisone was started at 40 mg/day and tapered to 10 mg/day.

Azathioprine was administered at a dose of 1-2 mg/kg per day, according to the clinician’s judgment. None of the study subjects had any evidence of cirrhosis.

A total of 176 subjects completed this phase. Reasons for withdrawal included lack of efficacy (3 patients taking budesonide and 12 taking prednisone), adverse events (3 patients taking budesonide, 3 taking prednisone), and lack of compliance with the study protocol (4 patients taking budesonide, 2 taking prednisone).

The study was described by researchers as the largest prospective, randomized, multicenter trial published to date for the treatment of autoimmune hepatitis.

Wednesday 23, Jun 2010

  Steroid concoction termed effective for patients with sinusitis

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Steroid concoction termed effective for patients with sinusitisA steroid nasal wash was termed as effective option for treating symptoms of chronic sinusitis without affecting adrenal gland function, as per a small US study. Budesonide, the nasal wash, is yet to get approval from the FDA for treating chronic sinusitis.

As per researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, this is the first-of-its kind study evaluating safety of such a nasal wash.

Chronic Sinusitis afflicts up to 14 percent of population in the United States and is a continuing inflammation of the nose and sinuses behind it.

Medical practitioners were advised by researchers to advise patients with sinusitis about the possible risks such as reduced bone mineral density that are linked with use of Budesonide in the long run.

Saturday 03, Apr 2010

  Sinusitis can be eased with steroid concoction

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Sinusitis can be eased with steroid concoctionA steroid nasal wash, Budesonide, could prove to be an effective option for minimizing the symptoms of chronic sinusitis without resulting in any effect on adrenal gland function.

This finding was disclosed by a small US study. The drug, however, is yet to get approval from the FDA for treating the complication.

It was remarked by researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis that this is the first-of-its-kind study examining the safety of a nasal wash.

The researchers advised the doctors to communicate the risks associated with use of Budesonide such as decreased bone mineral density to the patients.

Thursday 01, Apr 2010

  Continued benefits possible only with regular administration of asthma drugs

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Continued benefits possible only with regular administration of asthma drugsAccording to new results from a comprehensive childhood asthma study, there are no improvements after the steroid drugs are discontinued for children whose asthma improved while taking these drugs for many years.

This study, published in advance online publication of the Journal of Pediatrics, disclosed that children who took the medications during the trial and now in their last teens displayed no differences in terms of asthma control when compared with the children who received the placebo.

Robert C. Strunk, M.D., a Washington University pediatrician at St. Louis Children’s Hospital and lead author of the study, said that asthma control gets in kids with asthma as they grow older.

Sunday 03, Jan 2010

  Asthma treatment methodology simplified by combination inhaler

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Asthma treatment methodology simplified by combination inhalerAccording to a new review, chronic asthma patients can have a new treatment option allowing them to manage their ailment in an effective manner with a single prescribed inhaler that contains two medicines.

In the recent past, researchers have been examining the usage of both beta2-agonist (formoterol) and a low-dose corticosteroid (budesonide) in a single inhaler and this review evaluated the new inhaler’s effectiveness.

Carlos Camargo, M.D., an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, remarked that the single-inhaler therapy is a new approach to chronic asthma treatment that works but requires further study.

Sunday 27, Dec 2009

  Regular asthma dosages must for continued benefits

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Regular asthma dosages must for continued benefitsChildren suffering from asthma and being administered with steroids in the younger age but discontinuing the same after some time may not benefit from the same results, as per results from a comprehensive childhood asthma study.

This study finding came from the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) clinical trial that involved treatment of more than 1,000 children with mild-to-moderate asthma. Children were divided into three groups. While one received twice-daily budesonide and an inhaled corticosteroid, the second group received nedocromil (an inhaled non-steroid medication), and the third received placebo. All these groups also received albuterol, a bronchodilator, and oral corticosteroids for treating asthma symptoms.

The findings of this study are expected to offer new insights to members of the medical fraternity when it comes to formulation of new asthma treatment plans.

Friday 13, Nov 2009

  Continued benefit from asthma drugs require regular doses

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Continued benefit from asthma drugs require regular dosesAccording to new results from a comprehensive childhood asthma study, asthmatic children who benefited from steroid drugs are unable to experience the same results after discontinuing the usage.

The findings of this study came from the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) clinical trial in which more than 1,000 children were treated for mild-to-moderate asthma. Children were divided into three groups in which one group received twice-daily budesonide and an inhaled corticosteroid medication, the second group received a placebo and the third group received nedocromil (an inhaled non-steroid medication). All the three groups also received albuterol, a bronchodilator, and oral corticosteroids for treating asthma symptoms.

From News-Medical.Net:

Inhaled corticosteroids such as budesonide have been shown to be the most effective form of anti-inflammatory treatment for asthma by controlling symptoms and improving pulmonary function. Results from the original CAMP trial showed that using budesonide twice daily led to fewer hospitalizations and urgent care visits, fewer days in which additional asthma medications were needed and a reduced need for albuterol, a fast-acting drug for relief of acute asthma symptoms. Using nedocromil twice daily reduced urgent care visits and courses of oral steroids for severe symptoms, but did not affect the number of hospitalizations, symptoms or airway responsiveness.

Although the patients had fewer symptoms five years after stopping the daily medication, Strunk cautions that doesn’t mean that they can stop using asthma medications altogether or that their asthma is cured.

In another part of the follow-up study, the involved researchers had a close look at the long-term side effects of the steroid therapy on bone density, fracture rate, and growth.

The study is expected to provide deep insights to the medical fraternity to formulate new plans for treating asthma, which is considered to affect more than 150,000 people in the United States alone.


Tuesday 25, Aug 2009

  Acute sinusitis can be prevented with steroids

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Acute sinusitis can be prevented with steroidsAccording to a new review by researchers from Israel, steroid nasal sprays – either alone or with antibiotic therapy – can prove to be effective in preventing and curing acute sinusitis, which can develop following a chest cold.

The review was published in an issue of The Cochrane Library, a renowned publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, which is an international organization evaluating all aspects of health care.

It is believed that approximately 37 million Americans suffer from acute sinusitis. The findings of this review will help them and patients worldwide to get relief.

From News-Medical.Net:

Study participants, who underwent X-rays or nasal endoscopy to confirm diagnosis, received either a placebo or intranasal corticosteroids for two or three weeks, alone or in combination with antibiotics. Intranasal corticosteroids used included fluticasone propionate (Flonase), mometasone furoate (Nasonex) and budesonide (Rhinocort).

Overall, 73 percent of the patients treated with nasal steroids experienced relief or marked improvement of symptoms during the study period, compared with only 66.4 percent of patients who received the placebo.

“For every 100 patients treated with intranasal corticosteroids, seven additional patients had complete or marked symptom relief,” compared to those in the placebo group, the reviewers found.

Researchers pooled data from three of the four studies, excluding the lowest-quality study from the statistical analysis.

None of the studies reported serious side effects, and rates of sinusitis relapse were similar between the treatment and placebo groups.

Stronger doses of nasal steroids appeared to work better. Patients receiving daily doses of 400 micrograms were more likely to experience relief of sinusitis symptoms, than were patients receiving 200-microgram doses.

Allen Seiden, M.D., director of the University of Cincinnati Taste and Smell Center, remarked that more data is required before recommendations for intranasal corticosteroids can be made.

The involved reviewers were of the view that the findings of this review support the clinical rationale behind addition of an intranasal corticosteroid to antibiotic therapy.

Thursday 20, Aug 2009

  Budesonide not effective in treating diarrhea among Melanoma patients

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Budesonide not effective in treating diarrhea among Melanoma patientsMelanoma is a malignant tumor of skin cells called melanocytes. It is one of the less common types of skin cancer. It predominantly affects the skin but it can also affect the eyes and the intestines. It frequently affects male Caucasians, especially those living in sunny climates. According to the World Health Organization, about 48,000 worldwide deaths due to melanoma occur every year.

Patients with stage III or IV metastatic melanoma are usually prescribed with ipilimumab. Ipilimumab is a human specific antibody being currently developed for the treatment of melanoma. It is believed to stimulate the activity of the immune system.

The oral steroid budesonide is also given to melanoma patients because it is believed to reduce one side effect of ipilimumab, diarrhea.

According to a study conducted by a team of researchers led by Jeffrey Weber, MD, PhD, senior member of the Moffitt Cancer Center and director of the Donald A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center in Tampa Florida, budesonide exhibited no preventive properties for ipilimumab side effects.

Patients were treated with a daily dose of budesonide concomitant with ipilimumab treatment. After four months, researchers did not find any marked difference in the incidence of diarrhea between patients who received budesonide and those who received placebo.

According to Medical News Today:

Patients with stage III or IV melanoma taking ipilimumab and the oral steroid budesonide to reduce side effects did not have less diarrhea, a known side effect of ipilimumab, according to results of a phase II trial published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Wednesday 19, Aug 2009

  Budesonide found to reduce symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Budesonide found to reduce symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitisBudesonide, a form of corticosteroid, used in asthma and nasal polyps, has been found to be effective in treating symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis.

Rhinosinusitis is a new classification of sinusitis referring to the inflammation of the sinuses including the nose. A sinusitis is considered chronic if it persists for 12 weeks or more. It may occur with nasal polyps but there are cases without.

According to Neil Sachnadani, BS, and colleagues at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, a nasal wash containing budesonide and saline solution can improve clinical symptoms of rhinosinusitis.

The study was conducted by giving the participants a nasal wash with 0.25 mg budesonide in 5 ml saline solution. The participants have to apply the nasal wash in each nostril for 30 days. They were also made to answer a set of questionnaires relating to their symptoms and related quality of life. This was done before and after the study period.

A standard method of testing used was consyntropin injections. It stimulates the release of cortisol by the adrenal glands. This is to determine the adrenal response after budesonide therapy.

All participants reported some form of relief after therapy. Researchers also found that adrenal responses remained normal even after budesonide therapy. This indicates that budesonide is effective in treating rhinosinusitis without suppressing the adrenal function of the body.

From Eurekalert:

A nasal wash containing the corticosteroid budesonide appears to reduce symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis without suppressing the function of the adrenal glands, a known complication of this type of drug that would indicate absorption throughout the whole body, according to a report in the March issue of Archives of Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Next »