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Monday 17, May 2010

  Continuing steroid doses associated with cerebral palsy

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Continuing steroid doses associated with cerebral palsyRepeated courses of a corticosteroid called betamethasone that is used for improving the survival of unborn premature babies could possibly increase the risk of cerebral palsy in those children.

This finding was revealed as part of results from a multi-center study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health and led by Ronald Wapner, M.D., professor of obstetrics and gynecology, Columbia University Medical Center and attending obstetrician and gynecologist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia.

This research was supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health and the study results were published in an issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Wednesday 06, Jan 2010

  Continued steroid doses to premature infants linked to cerebral palsy

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cerebral-palsy

Repeated courses of a corticosteroid called betamethasone, which is indicated for improving the survival of unborn premature babies, can increase the risks of cerebral palsy in those children.

This finding was disclosed as per results from a multi-center study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and led by Ronald Wapner, M.D., professor of obstetrics and gynecology, Columbia University Medical Center and attending obstetrician and gynecologist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia.

The study results were published in an issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

It was remarked by Dr. Wapner that since weekly courses had no long-term benefits and may potentially harm the child, medical doctors must not administer multiple weekly courses of corticosteroids.

Wednesday 30, Sep 2009

  Steroids use in preemies linked to cerebral palsy

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Steroids use in preemies linked to cerebral palsy  According to a multi study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), steroids used to improve the lung development of premature babies could actually increase their risk for cerebral palsy.

Steroids, specifically, a corticosteroid called betamethasone is a drug that has shown to decrease neonatal mortality. It is given to women at risk of giving birth prematurely in order to hasten the development of the baby’s lungs.

Obstetrician – gynecologists often practice repeated course of steroids administration every week of up to 10 to 11 times. However, NIH representatives were so concerned with the safety that they wanted to limit the repeated courses for patients enrolled in clinical trials.

A study was performed by the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Network involving infants from the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital and 12 other sites around the country. Multiple courses of steroids were given to mothers and by the time the children reached the age of two or three years old, it was found that 6 out of 248 children in the treatment group were diagnosed with cerebral palsy while only 1 out of 238 children in the placebo group was diagnosed with the disease.

Dr. Wapner, head of the study advised that doctors multiple doses of steroids should not be administered since it could potentially do more harm than good.

Tuesday 18, Aug 2009

  Repeated steroids on preemies can increase incidence of cerebral palsy

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Repeated steroids on preemies can increase incidence of  cerebral palsyAlthough the corticosteroid betamethasone can improve the survival rate of premature babies, it may also increase their risk for developing cerebral palsy. Betamethasone is used to accelerate lung development in premature babies. It may also decrease the incidence and mortality from intracranial bleeding in premature babies.

According to results of studies funded by the National Institutes of Health headed by Ronald Wapner, MD, an obstetrics and gynecology professor at the Columbia University Medical Center and an attending obstetrician and gynecologist at the New York Presbyterian Hospital in Columbia, repeated courses of steroids lack safety evidence.

To study the long-term effects of steroids, women who continued pregnancy a week after the initial steroids treatment were given a weekly course of steroids or placebo until the babies were born.

The incidence of cerebral palsy among children whose mothers received long-term steroids treatment were found to be higher compared to those whose mothers only received placebo.

By ages two to three years old, those children with physical or neurological defects were diagnosed to have cerebral palsy.

Since long-term benefits of corticosteroids were not established among pregnant women, Dr. Wapner concluded that doctors should take precaution in administering weekly courses due to the potential harm it may cause to the child.

According to Eurekalert:

NEW YORK – Repeated courses of a drug that is used to improve the survival of unborn premature babies also may increase the risk of cerebral palsy in those children, according to results from a multi-center study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and led by Ronald Wapner, M.D., professor of obstetrics and gynecology, Columbia University Medical Center and attending obstetrician and gynecologist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia.

Tuesday 19, May 2009

  Corticosteroid May Cause Cerebral Palsy On Babies

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Corticosteroid May Cause Cerebral Palsy On BabiesA corticosteroid called betamethasone is given to women at risk of premature delivery to hasten the development of their baby’s lungs and to reduce neonatal mortality. However, repeated courses of this steroid may increase the risk of cerebral palsy among these babies.

The study conducted by members of the NIH-sponsored Maternal-Fetal Medicine Network at the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital showed that that six out of 248 babies age two to three who received multiple courses of corticosteroids had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy, compared to only 1 out of 238 children treated with placebo.

According to Dr. Ronald Wapner, although the difference in number of children with cerebral palsy was not statistically significant, doctors should not administer multiple weekly courses of corticosteroids because it may cause potential harm to children.

Sunday 12, Apr 2009

  Repeated Corticosteroids lead to Cerebral Palsy in Premature Infants

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Repeated Corticosteroids lead to Cerebral Palsy in Premature InfantsAccording to a multi-center study, it was found that a drug’s repeated courses used mainly for the improvement of survival conditions of unborn premature babies might increase the risk of cerebral palsy in those children. The study was supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health and was also funded by the Institute.

The research was funded by the Institute and led by Ronald Wapner, physician and professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the Columbia University Medical Center. Performed by members of the NIH-sponsored Maternal-Fetal Medicine Network, the study followed a total of 556 infants, aged two to three, at the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia and 12 other sites around the country. Infants were divided into two groups: placebo group and multiple doses group.

During the research, it was found that six out of 248 children who received multiple courses of corticosteroids had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy in comparison to only 1 out of 238 children in the placebo group. It was also revealed that mother of those six diagnosed children had received four or more courses of the drug.

Dr. Wapner said, “Although the difference in number of children with cerebral palsy was not statistically significant.” He also added that though weekly courses had no long-term benefits, but might harm the child, doctors should not run multiple weekly courses of corticosteroids.

Until the year 2000, obstetrician-gynecologists frequently prescribed repeated course of steroids every week, up to 10 to 11 times, for women, who remained pregnant after the first course. During the same year, a NIH panel suggested that multiple courses should be strictly reserved for patients enrolled in clinical trials.