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Sunday 07, Mar 2010

  Fit and Unfit benefit equally from improved body image

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Fit and Unfit benefit equally from improved body imageA new study conducted at the University of Florida has revealed that people who do not attain workout milestones feel just as good about their bodies as their athletic counterparts.

The study by Heather Hausenblas, a UF exercise psychologist, and graduate student Anna Campbell is the first to systematically analyze the wide-ranging effects of exercise on body image.

The study was published in the September 2009 issue of the Journal of Health Psychology.

Tuesday 29, Dec 2009

  Short, frequent lower intensity exercise bouts can enhance body image

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Short, frequent lower intensity exercise bouts can enhance body imageAccording to a new University of Florida study, the simple acts of exercise and not fitness itself can convince you about your “smart” appearance.

It was remarked by Heather Hausenblas, a UF exercise psychologist, that individuals who do not attain workout milestones like gaining strength, boosting cardiovascular fitness, and losing fat feel as good as their more athletic peers.

This study was published in the September issue of the Journal of Health Psychology.

Kathleen Martin Ginis, a kinesiology professor at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, and exercise expert remarked while praising this research by saying that this study shows that any exercise on a regular basis can help individuals feel better about their bodies and frequent bouts of lower intensity exercise can easily enhance body image.

Wednesday 16, Dec 2009

  Exercises enhance body image for one and all

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Exercises enhance body image for one and allA new University of Florida study has suggested that the simple exercise acts and not fitness itself can convince one and all that they look better.

Heather Hausenblas, a UF exercise psychologist, said that people who do not engage themselves in intense workouts like their athletic counterparts can still feel as good.

The study was published in the September issue of the Journal of Health Psychology.

Kathleen Martin Ginis, a kinesiology professor at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, and exercise expert, while appreciating the findings remarked that this is an important study as it shows that any type of exercise performed on a regular basis has the potential to make people feel better about their bodies.

Tuesday 13, May 2008

  Steroid Use – Caricatured and Stigmatized

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cheatingsteroidsSteroid use is considered cheating in sports. It has been (and still is) a hot issue in competitive sports. And it looks like critics and supporters of steroid use could not find a common ground to talk about the many aspects of steroid use in athletics, including the legal and medical issues.

Supporters would say that synthetic steroids use is not an evil deed, as many suppose. Or, more to the point, as many presuppose as many sectors of society are not informed about the nature of these drugs, and yet are capable of arriving at derogatory conclusion. Stigma is almost always a product of misinformed or uniformed point of view; and stigma can morph into many forms that can further fuel the already hot topic. One such form is caricatures.

Steroid use in sports is quite a favorite subject of the art of caricaturing, and steroid users and supporters oftentimes do not agree with the portrayal. There’s this one caricature that elicits ire from steroid defenders, go to www.CartoonStock.com, and get a picture (or a caricature, to be more precise) of how others view steroids and their non-medical use.

It seems that we tend to caricature everything and everyone nowadays – from ideas to world views, from Osama to Allah, from Bush to Paris Hilton. But the question is do these portrayals submit the general picture?

True, supporters say, steroids do enhance the performance and physique of athletes, but several factors are required for an athlete to be the winner in the playing field. Also, using steroids is not different from enhancing one’s physical appearance through cosmetic products and surgeries. A liposuction, for instance, a surgical procedure used to rid the body off excess fatty tissues can be compared to using Proviron to avoid fat accumulation in the body.

At one end of this tightrope, are the critics who say that it is ethically and morally wrong to use these synthetic compounds as they cause undue advantage over other competitors. Therefore, whoever is found out using steroids should suffer punishments in the form of fines or ban from playing the sports.

Now, we ask when will there be a satisfactory agreement between these two sides? But the more important question is when will the stigma against steroid use end?