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Saturday 21, Aug 2010

  Obese asthmatic patients fail to benefit from steroids

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Obese asthmatic patients fail to benefit from steroidsThe primary controller medication for asthma, glucocorticoids, is 40 percent less effective in obese and overweight asthmatic patients when compared to patients with normal weight, according to researchers at National Jewish Health.

A long-term study was initiated by Dr. Sutherland and his colleagues for evaluating the clinical effects of steroid resistance among overweight and obese asthma patients and further clarifying the signaling pathways involved.

The study by Associate Professor of Medicine E. Rand Sutherland, MD, MPH and his colleagues at National Jewish Health, appeared in an issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Thursday 29, Jul 2010

  Low doses of steroids can help myeloma patients

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Low doses of steroids can help myeloma patientsAccording to results of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Phase III clinical trial E4A03 for multiple myeloma, patients with multiple myeloma can experience dramatically improved results when they are administered with a combination of lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone therapy when compared to a combination of lenalidomide plus high-dose dexamethasone.

This finding was reported by S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D. at the American Society of Hematology‘s annual meeting.

Dr. Rajkumar, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center hematologist and lead investigator of the study, noted that it is surprising to know that side effects are increased and survival rate is reduced when high doses of steroids are administered.

Thursday 22, Jul 2010

  A combination of drugs may do the trick for multiple myeloma

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A combination of drugs may do the trick for multiple myelomaLenalidomide and Dexamethasone, two drugs when taken in a combination, can prove useful for providing significant relief to patients afflicted with multiple myeloma. This finding was disclosed by a study that was conducted at 44 centers in the United States and Canada and involved 353 patients with myeloma.

Progression of myeloma can be slowed down with the pairing of a new derivative of thalidomide with a steroid and this combination could prolong lives of patients who have relapsed from treatments in the past.

Lead author Donna Weber, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, remarked that this combination can do the trick particularly when the disease becomes immune to one therapy.

Tuesday 13, Jul 2010

  Combination of steroids effective against multiple myeloma

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Combination of steroids effective against multiple myelomaA combination of steroids, lenalidomide and dexamethasone, is effective against multiple myeloma that is considered to be one of the most dreaded forms of cancer. This finding was disclosed by a study involving 353 patients with myeloma that was conducted at 44 centers in the United States and Canada.

The study highlighted that pairing a new thalidomide derivative with a steroid could be more than useful for slowing down future progression of multiple myeloma.

Lead author Donna Weber, M.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, said that a combination of steroids can be useful for treating the disease, especially when the disease becomes resistant to one drug.

Sunday 11, Jul 2010

  Young patients with lower respiratory infections derive no benefit from steroids

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Young patients with lower respiratory infections derive no benefit from steroidsThe use of medications containing steroids are of little to no use when it comes to preventing visit to the hospital or improving respiratory symptoms related to bronchiolitis, a common viral lower respiratory infection in infants. This finding was disclosed in a study published in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

These findings by the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) are considered by many as qualified advice to treat bronchiolitis, one of the most common causes of infant hospitalization.

This study truly highlights the power of PECARN to provide answers to otherwise difficult-to-answer questions, as per Nathan Kuppermann, M.D., a professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the University of California, Davis, chair of the PECARN network’s steering committee, and the senior investigator of the study.

Friday 25, Jun 2010

  Steroids not good enough to help children with lower respiratory infections

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Steroids not good enough to help children with lower respiratory infectionsAccording to a study published in an issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, medications containing steroids are not effective for improving respiratory symptoms or preventing hospitalization among infants suffering with bronchiolitis.

Findings of the study truly highlights the power of a research network such as Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) in providing answers to otherwise difficult-to-answer questions, according to Nathan Kuppermann, M.D., a professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the University of California, Davis, chair of the PECARN network’s steering committee and the senior investigator of the study.

These findings by PECARN offer critical implications for medical practitioners to treat bronchiolitis, one of the most common causes of infant hospitalization.

Tuesday 22, Jun 2010

  Drug combination effective to treat patients with multiple myeloma

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Drug combination effective to treat patients with multiple myelomaDuring a study conducted at 44 centers in the United States and Canada and involving 353 patients with myeloma, it was found that a combination of drugs lenalidomide and dexamethasone could be useful for treating patients.

It was found during the study that pairing a new derivative of thalidomide with a steroid could slow down the progress of multiple myeloma along with prolonging lives of patients who have earlier relapsed from past treatments.

It was remarked by lead author Donna Weber, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center that these combinational drugs are effective as the disease may become immune to one therapy.

Saturday 29, May 2010

  Obese asthmatic patients do not benefit from steroids like others

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Obese asthmatic patients do not benefit from steroids like othersGlucocorticoids, the primary controller medication for asthma, are 40 percent less effective in obese and overweight asthma patients than in asthmatic patients with normal weight. This finding was disclosed by researchers at National Jewish Health.

The study, by Associate Professor of Medicine E. Rand Sutherland, MD, MPH and his colleagues at National Jewish Health, appeared in an issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

It was remarked that inhaled steroids are still effective in treating overweight and obese asthmatics.

Thursday 20, May 2010

  More asthma symptoms linked with low levels of Vitamin D

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More asthma symptoms linked with low levels of Vitamin DLow vitamin D levels share a relationship with lower lung function and greater medication use in children affected with asthma, as per researchers at National Jewish Health in a paper published online in the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology.

It was reported by Daniel Searing, MD, and his colleagues that vitamin D has the ability to improve the activity of corticosteroids, which are considered to be the most effective of all asthma control medications.

Dr. Leung said that the work suggested that vitamin D improves the anti-inflammatory function of corticosteroids.

Sunday 09, May 2010

  Children with lower respiratory infections not able to find relief with steroid medications

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Children with lower respiratory infections not able to find relief with steroid medicationsYoung children suffering with bronchiolitis, a common viral lower respiratory infection in infants, are not able to find any relief with medications based on steroids, as per a study published in an issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

This finding by the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) resolved controversy from past research and is considered to guide during treatment for the most common cause of infant hospitalization.

Howard M. Corneli, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah and the principal investigator on the study, said that glucocorticoids (a form of steroids) do not prove effective for treating bronchiolitis and future efforts must be focused upon better treatments and better preventive strategies.

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