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Sunday 09, Nov 2014

  Canada Does Not Have Organized Doping System

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Canada Does Not Have Organized Doping System

An independent agency working on behalf of Cycling Canada has remarked that there is no overarching doping program in the country. The agency however disclosed in a report that Canada must improve its efforts to build a better educational platform for discouraging the use of performance enhancing drugs.

The report, entitled “National Consultation on Doping Activity in the Sport of Cycling,” emphasized on different areas of sport ethics like decision making, testing, and the culture of cycling and performance enhancing drugs. The report said there may have been isolated cases of performance enhancing drug use but they were not part of a national culture of performance enhancing drug use in elite cycling.

In a release, Greg Mathieu, chief executive officer of Cycling Canada, said we are pleased to hear that the report confirms that there is no ‘culture of doping’ in Canadian Cycling. Mathieu added we have been very clear in the past that Cycling Canada does not tolerate any athletes who try to cheat on their way to better performances and also remarked that we believe that it is possible to win at Olympic Games, World championships, or any other international or national events without the use of any doping agents.

The findings come after a series of confessions from professional cyclist from North America to using performance enhancing drugs through the “Reasoned Decision” of the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA). The USADA repot centered on Lance Armstrong and his U.S. Postal Service team.

Danish rider Michael Rasmussen in his autobiography, “Yellow Fever,” had remarked that he taught Canadians Ryder Hesjedal, Michael Barry, Seamus McGrath, and Chris Sheppard on how to use Erythropoietin (EPO). While Michael Barry admitted to using PEDs during his time on the USPS team the other two cyclists later admitted to using performance enhancing drugs on another instances.

Sheppard received a two-year suspension in 2005 after recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO) was found in his system. The cyclist was subjected to an out-of-competition urine test at his home in Kamloops on May 29, 2005. In 2013, Canadian mountain biker and Olympian Seamus McGrath admitted to doping. The cyclist had won silver in cross country at the 2002 Commonwealth Games and received bronze at the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne.

McGrath was placed ninth in the cross country event at the 2004 Olympics in Athens. Hesjedal, winner of the 2012 Giro d’Italia, admitted to doping after accusations by Rasmussen. His team Garmin-Sharp said Hesjedal had testified to the US Anti-Doping Agency and the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sports (CCES) much before the story of Rasmussen came out. Barry confessed to doping after he was named in the USADA report in the Lance Armstrong doping scandal. The cyclist said that he realized doping had become an endemic problem in professional cycling not long after he joined the US Postal Service team in 2002. Barry claimed he stopped doping in 2006 after he joined the T-Mobile team. Michael Barry admitted to using Erythropoietin (EPO), Human growth hormone (hGH) and Testosterone and accepted a six-month ban beginning September 10, 2012.

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Sunday 17, Feb 2013

  Former Professional Rider Testifies In Operation Puerto Trial

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Former Professional Rider Testifies In Operation Puerto Trial

Puerto trial plaintiff and former professional rider Jesus Manzano recently told the court about complex doping used in cycling. One of the plaintiffs in the Operation Puerto trial, Manzano provided details of a bewildering range of doping techniques that were used to improve performance and told Judge Julia Santamaria that two of the drugs he was given were developed for veterinary use.

Manzano said Actovegin and Oxiglobin are for animals and the team members used to share jokes that some days you barked and others you mooed. Jesus Manzano testified that under the supervision of the doctor at the center of the Puerto case, Eufemiano Fuentes, he was given blood doping transfusions, the banned blood booster erythropoietin (EPO) and substances for masking doping agents after their use.

The cyclist who collapsed during the 2003 Tour De France after a botched doping attempt involving banned performance enhancing drugs also said he saw a Spanish footballer who has played for the national team attended the clinic of Fuentes and there were also two famous Brazilian players. Manzano told the court how drugs would be transported inside the medical car of Fuentes and a special room was set aside at a hotel for him to administer transfusions, EPO, and other things.

An independent medical expert contracted by the World Anti-Doping Agency, Yorck Olaf Schumacher, was also questioned and said many of the techniques employed by Fuentes involved an element of risk. He added that blood doping as practiced by Fuentes could lead to low blood pressure, fatigue, and dizziness and added that was ‘normally only used in surgery that is scheduled in advance.’ Schumacher added that some of the blood extractions used by Eufemiano Fuentes involved 20 percent of the total volume of blood in the body that can disturb the proper functioning and added that Fuentes used to transport bags of blood around “as if it were the most normal thing in the world.”

The former Spanish cyclist whose near-death experience during the 2003 Tour de France led directly to the Operation Puerto investigation around the sport doctor. Manzano said he was treated with EPO in 2000, 2001, and 2003 by Eufemiano and the doctor and his sister used to offer riders with ‘white powders’ that would mask the blood booster and added that the white powder was put into the penis for deteriorating urine so that the riders didn’t deliver positive EPO tests. The former professional rider added that riders used to transfuse saline solution and human albumin into their bloodstream to lower the hematocrit level in attempts to pass the controls of the world governing body of cycling, the UCI. The former Kelme rider also remarked that the procedure used for preparing blood doping bags for use during competitions used to be planned in advance and said riders took EPO a month before an extraction and it was best to leave an additional 12-day margin so as not to test positive. Manzano also said that he had also been administered with HMG, a substance used for making the presence of the hormones, testosterone and epitetosterone.

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Wednesday 30, Jun 2010

  Growth hormone does not enhance physical performance

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Growth hormone does not enhance physical performanceIndividuals using injectable growth hormone (GH) for buildup of solid muscles or improve physical performance do not find any benefit, as per a dissertation from the Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University in Sweden.

Dr. Christer Ehrnborg remarked that there is an instant effect when growth hormone is injected into the body and sportsmen perceive this effect to be good enough to enhance performance but that’s not the case.

It is worth noting here that use of GH does not bring the same benefits as that from use of anabolic steroids. Moreover, GH abuse can lead to fatal side effects such as damage to the heart and blood vessels.