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Wednesday 04, Jan 2017

  Athletes Caught For Doping Will Be Banned For Life

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Distance-running great Haile Gebrselassie, who was elected head of the Ethiopian Athletics Federation (EAF), has remarked Ethiopia will impose lifetime bans on drug cheats.

Ethiopia was recently classified by the world governing body of track and field as one of five countries in “critical care” over its drug-testing systems. Kenya, Morocco, Ukraine, and Belarus are other nations in that category. Russia is presently banned from all athletic competitions after revelations of a state-sponsored doping regime and corruption allegations.

The country has been one of the superpowers in distance running along with neighboring Kenya but its credibility was questioned this year when six of its athletes came under investigation for doping.

The Ethiopian Athletics Federation also announced that it would be carrying out tests on up to 200 athletes. Gebrselassie remarked his administration has adopted a “zero tolerance” approach towards doping. The new president of the Ethiopian Athletics Federation said our stand is no excuse towards someone who has cheated and added any athlete as of today who has offended will be hit by a life ban. This would mean Ethiopian athletes who fail tests and are subject to a ban of four years from December 28 onwards will no longer be able to represent the country in any competition. The punishment is much stricter than the one currently imposed by the International Olympic Committee.

Gebrselassie said his focus is to convince the IAAF that the African country was serious in tackling doping. He also commented this would also prove out to be beneficial for getting Ethiopia removed from the list of countries identified by IAAF president Sebastian Coe as in need of “critical care”.

Under IOC rules, athletes caught doping can face doping bans of four years but they are eligible to compete in any international event, including the Olympics, after serving it.

Jama Aden, the coach of Ethiopian 2016 Olympic hopeful Genzebe Dibaba, and a physiotherapist from Morocco were taken into custody recently. This was after police raided his training group’s hotel rooms outside of Barcelona. Police found 60 used syringes of EPO and other banned substances in the hotel.

Previously, Ethiopian-born former 1,500 meters world champion, Abeba Aregawi, had failed an out-of-competition doping test. Few months back, the national team doctor, Ayalew Tilhaun said Ethiopians recently tested positive for anabolic steroids, Testosterone, the stimulant Ephedrine and the diuretic Furosemide, among other banned substances. Ethiopia’s 2015 Tokyo Marathon champion, Endeshaw Negesse, was also linked to a failed doping test.

Ethiopia Athletics Federation’s secretary general, Bililign Mekoya, had remarked in the past that evidence indicated that athletes were paying $900 to get a dose of banned substances in Ethiopia. Mekoya also said three athletes were formally suspended and another three are under investigation. Ayalew declined to identify the athletes because investigations are continuing. One runner, Sintayehu Mergia, identified himself as one of the athletes under suspicion but denied doping.

The IAAF is also investigating a number of Ethiopians for doping. Kenya and Ethiopia collectively won 24 medals at the world championships in Beijing last year.

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Monday 30, Nov 2015

  Seven Kenyan Athletes Banned For Doping

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Athletics Kenya has banned seven athletes including two-time cross-country world champion Emily Chebet for doping offences.

Chebet, the cross-country world champion in 2010 and 2013, received a doping ban of four years after he tested positive for Furosemide, a diuretic and masking agent. The 29-year-old Chebet was a bronze medalist in the 10,000 meters at last year’s Commonwealth Games in Glasgow and she will be unable to compete until July 16, 2019.

The list of sanctions also included bans for Joyce Zakary and Koki Manunga, who failed drugs tests at the World Championships in Beijing in August. Joyce and Koki were provisionally suspended at the World Championships and received bans of four years for Furosemide. Kenya’s Deputy President William Ruto announced plans to criminalize doping after Koki and Zakari tested positive in Beijing.

The other four athletes banned were Agnes Jepkosgei, Bernard Mwendia, Judy Jesire Kimuge, and Lilian Moraa Marita. Agnes Jepkosgei received a doping ban of four years after he tested positive for metabolite of Norandrosterone, an anabolic steroid. A ban of two years was imposed on Bernard Mwendia for testing positive to Norandrosterone. Lilian Moraa Marita received a two-year ban for the blood-booster Erythropoietin (EPO) and Kimuge was banned two years for Norandrolone.

The future of Kenya in World Athletics hangs in the balance as pressure mounts on the country to tackle doping and corruption issues. A harsh warning was issued by Colm O’Connell, the coach of leading Kenyan 800-meter runner David Rudisha, who remarked better testing and monitoring of our athletes has to be put in place immediately if Kenya wants to really move into the Olympics with a clear conscience and with global credibility. Two-time Olympic Champion Kip Keino warned that the next generation of athletes is in danger of being dragged into a world of doping.

In the last few years, there has been a significant spike in doping cases among Kenyan athletes. Since 2012, more than 40 athletes have now failed tests that included high-profile athletes such as Rita Jeptoo. A few days back, Kenyan track officials came under scrutiny after allegations of doping cover-ups surfaced and some officials were accused of money embezzlement at the national federation.

A group of athletes this week stormed the federation headquarters in Nairobi to demand the resignation of top officials over the doping scandals and corruption allegations. The protestors include the 2012 Boston marathon winner-turned politician, Wesley Korir, and former world marathon record holder Wilson Kipsang. Top Professional Athletes Association of Kenya (PAAK) official said we want to solve the long standing issues affecting us in regards to corruption, doping and other matters. In reply, Athletics Kenya (AK) chief Jackson Tuwei said we are waiting for the outcome of the meeting and were taken by complete surprise. Tuwei and the other Athletics Kenya officials have been barred from their offices since Monday morning.

It was recently reported by a World Anti-Doping Agency panel that Kenya also has a serious doping problem just like Russia that was recently banned from international athletics competitions.

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Sunday 11, May 2014

  Horse Racing Industry Must Act Diligently, Says RCI Chief

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Horse Racing Industry Must Act Diligently, Says RCI Chief

Ed Martin, president of the Association of Racing Commissioners International (RCI), has remarked tendency of the sport for self-flagellation and refusal of participants to take responsibility for their actions or lack of action are serious threats to the horse racing industry’s future.

The president of horse racing’s umbrella regulatory group gave the keynote address on the second day of the organization’s three-day conference in Lexington. Martin provided statistics that indicated that horse racing compares favorably with other major sports in terms of the percentage of clean drug tests. This is despite the fact that the sport tests far more samples each year. The RCI president also talked about investigations after People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) made allegations of horse abuse and mistreatment in the barn of Steve Asmussen.

Martin said we stand here today as regulators trying to police a sport, portions of which seem mired in a culture of negativity and added they never talk about what’s right with this sport. He added if you consistently talk about the negative, you will chase people away from a wonderful sport and if we’re not going to accentuate the positive, we might as well all pack up and go home now. The RCI chief said there are approximately 96,000 races run each year in the United States versus 2,475 Major League Baseball games, 1,275 National Basketball Association games, 1,275 National Hockey League games, and 275 National Football League games. Martin added that the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), that may oversee equine medication testing for racing, performs about 8,200 tests a year versus 320,000 in racing.  Martin said horse racing compares favorably with Olympics in which about 99.6 percent of test results come back clean for illegal drugs or therapeutic medication overages.

Martin went on to add that USADA allows exemptions for performance enhancing drugs while we don’t allow performance-enhancing substances in our horses (on race day)–you can make an argument for Lasix (Furosemide, also known as Salix) as being performance-enhancing, but we disclose its use (for each horse) and added that USADA doesn’t tell you who uses what drug in what competition. Martin went on to say that if we adopted the program USADA has implemented, it would increase drug use in horse racing.

The Association of Racing Commissioners International chief said he was as “disgusted as anyone else” when he was watching the video released by PETA in March. Martin said he is advocate for (the National Uniform Medication Program), but he is not sure even if we had all those rules on the books, we would have seen anything different (in the PETA video) and you can’t legislate morality. He also remarked that if owners don’t know what they should know, maybe that’s where the system of checks and balances has failed us. The horse racing’s umbrella regulatory group President added it is easy to detach yourself from the (regulatory) front line and it is also easy to sit in the judgment. He added let us stop talking down the sport as there are too many people whose livelihoods depend on it.

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Saturday 05, Oct 2013

  Doping Ban Avoided By Three-Time Olympic Gold Medalist

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Doping Ban Avoided By Three-Time Olympic Gold Medalist

Three-time Olympic gold medalist Veronica Campbell-Brown has received only a public warning from a Jamaican disciplinary panel. The athlete was suspended after returning a positive test for a banned diuretic at the Jamaica International Invitational meet in May.

The Jamaican athlete is now cleared to make a return to competition five months after she returned a positive doping test. Campbell-Brown missed the Jamaica’s national championships and the chance to race at the 2013 world championships in Moscow. The Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association said in a statement that its disciplinary committee recommended that a reprimand without any period of ineligibility would be appropriate. The disciplinary panel ruled that the athlete committed an anti-doping violation but the use of banned substance was for not performance enhancement.

In June this year, a spokesman for the IAAF said the athlete’s case appeared to involve a lesser offense of unintentional use of a banned substance.

Campbell-Brown tested positive for the diuretic Furosemide, a banned substance that is often marketed under the name Lasix. Furosemide is a diuretic which is on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) banned list because it can be used as a masking agent to conceal the presence of performance enhancing drugs. The athlete and her management team travelled to Canada to have her ‘B’ sample analyzed at the WADA-accredited laboratory in Montreal but she was notified that the second test had confirmed the original adverse finding.

Jamaica’s most decorated female athlete, Campbell-Brown is an online diarist for the International Association of Athletics Federations and a Goodwill Ambassador for UNESCO. In 2000, she became the first female to win the sprint double at the IAAF World Junior Championships and the following year, she was awarded the Austin Sealy Trophy for the most outstanding athlete of the 2001 CARIFTA Games. At the 2004 Athens Olympics, Veronia Campbell-Brown decimated the field in the 200m finals defeating favorite American Allyson Felix to become the first Jamaican and Caribbean National to win in the history of the games to won a sprint Olympic title. She won the silver medal in the 100 m at the 2005 World Championships in Athletics and a silver medal in the 4 x 100 m relay.

The athlete from Jamaica won three medals with a gold in the 100 m, a silver in the 200 m, and a silver in the 4 x 100 m relay at the 2007 World Championships. At the 208 Olympics, Veronica Campbell-Brown defended her Olympic 200 m title in a new personal best time of 21.74 s. In the 4x100m finals, the athletics star teamed up with Aleen Bailey, Tayna Lawrence, and Sherone Simpson to win the women 4x100m. Track and Field News, at the end of the 2008 season, selected her as the top 200 m runner in the world as well as the fourth best in the 100 m (following three other Jamaicans). Campbell-Brown won her first World Indoor 60m Gold medal in a time of 7.00 in 2010 and then went on to get the time of 21.98 (200 m) in New York.

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Wednesday 26, Jun 2013

  Paralympic Medal Winning Powerlifter Suspended

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Paralympic Medal Winning Powerlifter Suspended

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) has announced has Nigerian Paralympic medal winning powerlifter Folashade Oluwafemiayo has received a two-year suspension after testing positive for a banned substance at the 2013 Fazaa International Powerlifting Competition in Dubai.

Oluwafemiayo, who won silver in the women’s 75kg event at London 2012, returned an adverse analytical finding in a urine sample provided on February 26 for Furosemide (a loop diuretic), which the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) classifies as a masking agent for performance enhancing drugs. She was stripped of the 125kg world record and gold medal she clinched at the competition and received a fine of €1,500 (£1,300/$2,000). Furosemide is included on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s banned drug list due to its alleged use as a masking agent for other drugs and has also been used to prevent Thoroughbred and Standardbred race horses from bleeding through the nose during races.

After her suspension, Egyptian Geehan Hassan, who originally won silver with a lift of 117kg, will receive gold, bronze medalist Marzena Łazarz of Poland will take silver with 97kg and Libya’s Sahar El-Gnemi who finished fourth will be awarded the bronze medal with 90kg. A statement from the IPC reads Folashade Oluwafemiayo in accordance with the IPC Anti-Doping Code will serve a two-year suspension for the offence beginning on April 19 2013, the date from which she was notified of her Anti-Doping Rule Violation and added that the IPC remains committed to a doping free sporting environment at all levels as a signatory of the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC).

The Nigerian powerlifting games star, after winning a Silver medal at the London 2012 Paralympic games, married her male powerlifting counterpart Tolulope Owolabi on November 3, 2012 at Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria after having their traditional engagement in April 2012. The wedding was attended by the Sports Minister, Bolaji Abdullahi, the Director of Sports, Patrick Ekeji and some other top officials in the Sports Ministry.

Oluwafemiayo’s case came just a few days after Uzbekistani powerlifter Ruza Kuzieva was hit with an identical ban testing positive for a prohibited substance at the fifth Fazaa International Powerlifting Competition earlier this year. She was given a ban of two years for returning an adverse analytical finding for Methandienone, which is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and therefore prohibited under the IPC Anti-Doping Code, in a urine sample provided during the competition in Dubai on February 23. Suspension of the athlete began on April 19 and this means she will now lose all results, medals, points, records and prizes from February 23 onwards, including the bronze medal she won she set the junior world record with a lift of 52kg besides receiving a fine of €1,500 (£1,270/€2,000). An IPC statement reads the principle of strict liability applies to anti-doping matters and therefore, each athlete is strictly liable for the substances found in his or her sample, and that an anti-doping rule violation occurs whenever a prohibited substance (or its metabolites or markers) is found in his or her bodily specimen, whether or not the athlete intentionally or unintentionally used a prohibited substance or was negligent or otherwise at fault.

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Sunday 23, Jun 2013

  Doping Case Of Jamaican Runner Appears To Be A Minor Offense

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The doping case involving Jamaican star runner Veronica Campbell-Brown was “minor” and suggested that the reaction has been heightened due to the athlete’s international status, said an official of track and field’s world governing body, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).

The runner tested positive at the Jamaica International Invitational on May 4 for a banned substance that is believed to be a diuretic, triggering widescale international reaction, much of which was disproportionate to the offense, according to IAAF spokesman Nick Davies.

Davies remarked we can acknowledge that there is a case, but also take the opportunity to urge a sense of perspective and this seems from evidence to be a minor doping offense according to our rules, so we want to remain realistic in our reaction, pending the conclusion of the case. The IAAF spokesman also added that although we would not normally comment on active cases, all evidence seems to point to this offence being a lesser one. He also added that the situation has taken on great interest because of the international profile and appeal of Campbell-Brown and said there has been a disproportionate reaction, probably due to the fact that the athlete is a prominent Jamaican sprinter and it is very unfortunate when there are leaks (of information) – as has been the case here – since this is bad both for the athlete affected and for the sport in general.

As opposed to the mandatory two-year ban for serious cases, the penalty for minor offenses can range from a public warning to a suspension of a few months. Meanwhile, the management team of the runner released a statement acknowledging the positive test while pleading the athlete’s innocence of knowingly taking a banned substance while the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association said the current 200m World champion and a seven-time Olympic medalist was suspended from competition, pending the decision of a disciplinary panel, which will shortly review the case. The JAAA release said we also wish to point out that Veronica Campbell-Brown voluntarily withdrew herself from competition and accepted the provisional suspension.

Doping Case Of Jamaican Runner Appears To Be A Minor Offense

It is rumored that the banned drug was contained in a cream which Campbell-Brown, the first Jamaican athlete, male or female to win a global 100 meters title, was using to treat a leg injury and which she had declared on her doping control form. The Jamaican track and field sprint athlete who specializes in the 100 and 200 meters denied knowingly taking a banned substance Lasix, which also goes by the name Furosemide.

Veronica Campbell-Brown, one of only eight athletes to win world championships at the youth, junior, and senior level of an athletic event, is the second woman in history to win two consecutive Olympic 200 m events, after Bärbel Wöckel of Germany at the 1976 and 1980 Olympics. The Jamaican sprint legend in 2001 was awarded the Austin Sealy Trophy for the most outstanding athlete of the 2001 CARIFTA Games and she won 3 gold medals (100m, 200m, and 4x100m relay) in the junior (U-20) category the same year.

The popular runner is expected to miss the 14th IAAF World Championship in Moscow in August this year.

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Saturday 16, Mar 2013

  Jamaican Sprinter Loses Appeal Against Life Ban

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Jamaican sprinter loses appeal against life ban

Jamaican sprinter Steve Mullings has lost his appeal against a lifetime ban from athletics, according to an announcement by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Mullings appealed against a lifetime ban from athletics, imposed in November 2011 for a second doping offense after the 30-year-old who won a gold medal in the 4×100 meter relay at the 2009 world championships in Berlin, tested positive for testosterone in 2004 and for the banned diuretic furosemide in 2011. It was argued by the sprinter that there were problems with the 2004 positive test meaning it should not be counted as a first sanction for a doping offense but CAS rejected his arguments. Mullings went on to claim that the laboratory results of the 2011 test were unreliable and that the disciplinary proceedings were flawed.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport said proceedings were delayed as it collected evidence from both tests and disclosed that the CAS panel considered that the athlete had not presented any basis to challenge the testing procedure of the 2011 sample and the CAS panel did not find that the circumstances surrounding the first offense warranted a more lenient sanction while Mullings has attempted to raise suspicion about his first violation.

Mullings was sanctioned with a suspension of two years following a positive anti-doping control (methyltestoterone) in 2004. He provided an in-competition sample in June 2011 at the National Senior Championships in Jamaica which was tested at the WADA-accredited laboratory in Quebec, Canada, and which returned an adverse analytical finding for the presence of Furosemide, the prohibited substance. After this, disciplinary proceedings were opened by the Jamaican anti-doping authorities against Steve Mullings that resulted in a decision to suspend him for life for a second anti-doping offense. The athlete appealed  to the CAS on 19 December 2011 to request the annulment of the decision made by the JADCO Disciplinary Panel.

The case was handled by a CAS Panel composed of Mr David W. Rivkin, President (USA), Mr Christopher L. Campbell (USA), and Prof. Richard H. McLaren (Canada) who considered that Mullings had not presented any basis to challenge the testing procedure of the 2011 sample and the CAS panel did not find that the circumstances surrounding the first offense did warrant a lenient sanction while Mullings has attempted to raise suspicion about the first violation, and accordingly, it confirmed the lifetime ban.

The former sprint athlete who specialized in the 100 and 200 meter events began his international athletic career with a bronze medal win in the 100 m at the Pan American Junior Championships. Steve Mullings made his first impact in senior athletics at the 2004 national championship, setting new bests of 10.04 and 20.22 in the sprints, and finishing as the 200 m national champion. After being banned from competition for two years for testing positive for testosterone, the sprinter returned to competition in 2006 and competed at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics as a heats runner for the Jamaican silver medal-winning 4×100 meters relay team.

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Saturday 27, Oct 2012

  Damon Allen Accepts Sanction for Doping Violation

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Damon allen accepts sanction for doping violation

Damon Allen, Jr. of Philadelphia, an athlete in the sport of boxing, has tested positive for a prohibited substance and accepted a suspension for his doping offense, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 19-year-old Allen, Jr. tested positive for Furosemide, a diuretic, as the result of an out-of-competition sample collected on July 19, 2011.

Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Boxing Association (AIBA) anti-doping rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, diuretics are prohibited and listed as Specified Substances, and therefore the presence of those substances in an athlete’s sample can result in a reduced sanction.

A six-month period of ineligibility was accepted by Allen, Jr. that began on September 1, 2011, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. The boxing athlete is also disqualified from all results obtained on or subsequent to July 19, 2011, the day his urine sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes as a result of the sanction.

Damon was the silver medalist at the 2010 National Golden Gloves (Little Rock, Ark.) and took the first place at the 2009 Junior National Golden Gloves (Mesquito, Nev.). The boxer won the first place at the 2008 & 2009 Ringside World Championships (Kansas City, Mo.); Placed second at the 2009 Junior Olympic Nationals (Denver, Colo.) and the Third place at the 2008 Junior Olympic Nationals (Marquette, Mich.). A runner-up in 2010 National Golden Gloves tournament and a semi-finalist at 2011 US championships, the Northern Michigan University student lost all results since then but his ban is retroactive to September 1, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. The boxer fought in the US Olympic Boxing Trials in Mobile, Alabama, but did not book a spot for the London Olympics in the 132-pound division.

Furosemide is a diuretic but is commonly used as a masking agent and high-profile fighters such as Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. and former Guzman rival, Ali Funeka, and former Jr. Featherweight and super featherweight champion, Joan Guzman, have served suspensions for the banned substance. Furosemide or Lasix is a loop diuretic that is used for treating congestive heart failure and edema and is even used for preventing Thoroughbred and Standardbred race horses from bleeding through the nose during races and can increase the risk of digoxin toxicity due to hypokalemia. The drug is also suggested for health complications including Nephrotic syndrome, in adjunct therapy for cerebral/pulmonary edema where rapid diuresis is required (IV injection), hepatic cirrhosis, renal impairment, and in the management of severe hypercalcemia in combination with adequate rehydration. It is a noncompetitive subtype-specific blocker of GABA-A receptors and is detectable in urine 36–72 hours following injection. Furosemide is injected either intramuscularly (IM) or intravenously (IV) and its use is prohibited by most equestrian organizations. The drug is included on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s banned drug list as it can be used allegedly as a masking agent for other drugs.


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Saturday 22, Sep 2012

  Weightlifter Patrick Mendes Banned

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Weightlifter Patrick Mendes Banned

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has banned Olympic weightlifter Patrick Mendes after he tested positive for human growth hormone (HGH), a banned substance.

The weightlifter from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” in Las Vegas, Nevada failed anti-doping controls on February 7 and February 27, 2012 prior to the 2012 United States Olympic Team Trials for Weightlifting that determine who would represent the United States at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Patrick Mendes was the top-ranked U.S. Olympic weightlifter at over 105 kilograms.

Mendes was the protégé of renowned weightlifting coach John Broz who lived and trained during his competitive career with legendary Bulgarian superheavyweight Antonio Krastev, who recorded a world record snatch of 216 kilograms in 1987.

The 21-year-old Mendes who was a U.S. Olympic hopeful in weightlifting tested positive for human growth hormone (HGH). The prospective medal favorite in the super heavyweight division at the London Olympics confessed to using the drug after testing positive in two tests administered in February, according to the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) in a statement.

Graduated from Del Sol High in Las Vegas, Patrick Mendes accepted a two-year ban, which commenced on March 19. His positive test results for HGH were the result of two separate samples collected on February 7, 2012, and February 27, 2012 as part of USADA’s Out of Competition Testing Program. The samples of Mendes were tested at the WADA-accredited Sports Medicine Research & Testing Laboratory (SMRTL), located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Human Growth Hormone is prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Weightlifting Federation (“IWF”) Anti-Doping Policies, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

The weightlifter admitted his use of HGH and accepted a period of two years of ineligibility that began on March 19, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. As a result of the sanction, Mendes is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on or subsequent to February 7, 2012, the date the first blood sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart said the case demonstrates yet again that the human growth hormone testing works to stop this dangerous drug from being used in sport and added that the agency is pleased that Mendes chose to admit his use of HGH and accept the sanction.

With this suspension, the weightlifter become only the second U.S. athlete found using human growth hormone, the first being minor-league baseball player Mike Jacobs, who tested positive under the program instituted by Major League Baseball last summer.

In another development, 19-year-old Olympic weightlifter Joshua Gilbert of Las Vegas, Nev. from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” tested positive for the diuretic furosemide at the 2012 National Weightlifting Championships that was held in conjunction with the U.S. Olympic Trials as part of the Arnold Sports Festival in Columbus (Ohio) on March 2, 2012. Joshua Gilbert was suspended for a period of three years for his anti-doping rule violation by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).


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Friday 21, Sep 2012

  Olympic Weightlifter Joshua Gilbert Banned

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Olympic Weightlifter Joshua Gilbert Banned

Olympic weightlifter Joshua Gilbert of Las Vegas, Nev., an athlete in the sport of weightlifting, accepted a suspension of three years from the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) for his anti-doping rule violation.

The 19-year-old tested positive for Furosemide on March 2, 2012 at the National Championships, and refused to submit to doping control on March 20, 2012. Since Gilbert had not yet been notified of the results of the March 2nd test prior to his refusal to submit, under the rules both incidents are classified as one anti-doping rule violation. Both the incidents are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Weightlifting Federation (“IWF”) Anti-Doping Policies, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

Gilbert was banned from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” (Las Vegas, Nevada) after he tested positive for a banned substance.

Aggravating circumstances justify a period of ineligibility greater than the standard sanction, and as such the weightlifter received a three-year period of ineligibility for his anti-doping rule violation which began on April 5, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional suspension in accordance with the WADA Code.

Joshua Gilbert s also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on or subsequent to, March 2, 2012, the date his sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes. Gilbert, a promising Olympic lifter who trained under John Broz, tested positive for diuretic furosemide at the 2012 National Weightlifting Championships that was held in conjunction with the U.S. Olympic Trials as part of the Arnold Sports Festival in Columbus (Ohio) on March 2, 2012. Broz lived and trained with legendary Bulgarian superheavyweight Antonio Krastev, who recorded a world record snatch of 216 kilograms in 1987, during his career.

Furosemide is listed as a masking agent because of its potential to assist in elimination of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing drugs from the body besides helping athletes to make weight in sports with multiple weight classes like weightlifting, boxing, and wrestling.

In another development, Patrick Mendes also from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” tested positive for human growth hormone and was suspended for a period of two years. The 21-year-old tested positive for Human Growth Hormone (HGH) as the result of two separate samples collected on February 7, 2012, and February 27, 2012 as part of USADA’s Out of Competition Testing Program. The samples were tested at the WADA-accredited Sports Medicine Research & Testing Laboratory (SMRTL), located in Salt Lake City, Utah. HGH is prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Weightlifting Federation (“IWF”) Anti-Doping Policies, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code. He accepted a two-year period of ineligibility, which began on March 19, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional suspension.

A U.S. Olympic hopeful in weightlifting, Mendes, tested positive for human growth hormone (HGH). Mendes, who graduated from Del Sol High in Las Vegas, accepted a two-year ban, which commenced on March 19. Mendes became the second U.S. athlete found using HGH after minor-league baseball player Mike Jacobs, who tested positive under the program instituted by Major League Baseball last summer.

Olympic Weightlifter Joshua Gilbert Banned

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