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Thursday 24, Nov 2011

  Brain development affected by steroids in premature babies

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A study has confirmed that powerful steroids can affect brain development in premature babies.

Researcher Emily Tam, MD, of the University of California-San Francisco explains that animal studies found that the steroids called glucocorticoids affect a certain part of the brain.

“On the other hand,” Tam says, “we did find that when hydrocortisone and dexamethasone were given after the child was born, this was associated with decreased growth of cerebellum. So by term age, the cerebellum was 10 percent smaller that it should have been.”

Tuesday 08, Nov 2011

  Harm to brain when steroids are given to premature infants

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Preterm infants who are treated with glucocorticoids could be at a growing risk for damage to the cerebellum in the brain, according to a recent study by scientists from the University of California.

Glucocorticoids are usually administered to premature infants to facilitate lung maturation and normalization of breathing and blood pressure.

The study, ‘Preterm Cerebellar Growth Impairment After Postnatal Exposure to Glucocorticoids’, is published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Thursday 28, Oct 2010

  Potential treatment option for osteonecrosis discovered

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Potential treatment for osteonecrosis identifiedResearchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have been able to identify a potential treatment for the death of bone tissue or osteonecrosis.

The health complication is noticed among people administered with steroids to treat different medical conditions; there is no treatment option, at present, to provide relief to patients afflicted with this complication.

The research was published in the April 27 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Saturday 21, Aug 2010

  Obese asthmatic patients fail to benefit from steroids

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Obese asthmatic patients fail to benefit from steroidsThe primary controller medication for asthma, glucocorticoids, is 40 percent less effective in obese and overweight asthmatic patients when compared to patients with normal weight, according to researchers at National Jewish Health.

A long-term study was initiated by Dr. Sutherland and his colleagues for evaluating the clinical effects of steroid resistance among overweight and obese asthma patients and further clarifying the signaling pathways involved.

The study by Associate Professor of Medicine E. Rand Sutherland, MD, MPH and his colleagues at National Jewish Health, appeared in an issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Friday 20, Aug 2010

  Potential bone death treatment in the hip from osteonecrosis

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Potential bone death treatment in the hip from osteonecrosisA potential treatment for the death of bone tissue or osteonecrosis has been identified by researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

This complication is seen in people administered with steroids for varying medical conditions and there is no treatment option at present to deal with this debilitating disease.

The research was published in the April 27 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Saturday 29, May 2010

  Obese asthmatic patients do not benefit from steroids like others

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Obese asthmatic patients do not benefit from steroids like othersGlucocorticoids, the primary controller medication for asthma, are 40 percent less effective in obese and overweight asthma patients than in asthmatic patients with normal weight. This finding was disclosed by researchers at National Jewish Health.

The study, by Associate Professor of Medicine E. Rand Sutherland, MD, MPH and his colleagues at National Jewish Health, appeared in an issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

It was remarked that inhaled steroids are still effective in treating overweight and obese asthmatics.

Tuesday 18, May 2010

  Potential treatment for osteonecrosis identified

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Potential treatment for osteonecrosis identifiedA potential new treatment for death of bone tissue or osteonecrosis has been identified by researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. This form of treatment is in context to individuals who are treated with steroids for different common medical disorders.

Presently, there are no treatment options for people affected with this debilitating disease.

The research was published in the April 27 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Sunday 02, May 2010

  Intravenous Immunoglobulin minimizes insensitivity to steroids

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Intravenous Immunoglobulin minimizes insensitivity to steroidsPeople suffering from severe asthma and insensitive to steroids require less of the medication and spend less time in the hospital when compared with those using intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in conjunction with steroids. This finding was disclosed by a research published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Researchers were of the view that IVIG increases the sensitivity of the lungs to steroids in part by minimizing lung inflammation.

Erwin Gelfand, M.D., a pediatric immunology and asthma specialist and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at National Jewish Medical and Research Center, said he has noticed asthmatic patients who required high doses of steroids in order to control the disease.

Friday 23, Apr 2010

  Interference with vagal nerve activity prevents hypertension and diabetes in mice

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Interference with vagal nerve activity prevents hypertension and diabetes in mice  According to scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, diabetes and hypertension in mice can be prevented by interrupting nerve signals to the liver. The finding was reported in an issue of the journal Cell Metabolism.

Clay F. Semenkovich, M.D., professor of medicine and of cell biology and physiology, said that interrupting vagal nerve signaling can prevent the development of hypertension and diabetes at least in mice.

Semenkovich remarked that he is not sure as of now if this works for humans but expect that alteration of vagal nerve activity can offer a novel approach to treat the common metabolic disorders.

Thursday 22, Apr 2010

  Post-traumatic stress reversible with steroids

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Post-traumatic stress reversible with steroidsHuman body’s own natural stress hormone can help in reducing the fearful response associated with reliving a traumatic memory, according to researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center, working with mice.

Dr. Craig Powell, senior author and assistant professor of neurology and psychiatry at UT Southwestern, said corticosterone tends to enhance new memories that compete with the fearful memory to reduce its negative emotional significance.

The work was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Conte Center, the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

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