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Monday 24, May 2010

  Use of stem cells for modeling birth defects among infants

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Use of stem cells for modeling birth defects among infantsStrawberry-like birthmarks that commonly develop in early infancy, Hemangiomas, are considered harmless but researchers at Children’s Hospital Boston recently discovered that up to ten percent of Hemangiomas cause tissue distortion or destruction and sometimes vision obstruction.

In the March 18 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, the researchers showed that steroids target hemangioma stem cells specifically, revealed the action mechanism, and suggested other available ways for halting and shrinking hemangiomas.

Children’s plastic surgeon John Mulliken, MD, co-director of Children’s Vascular Anomalies Center and a co-author on the study, said that his dream was always to give a drug for stopping hemangioma at its first appearance.

Friday 30, Apr 2010

  Use of stem cells for modeling infant birth defect

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Use of stem cells for modeling infant birth defectHemangiomas, which are strawberry like birthmarks commonly seen during early infancy, are usually harmless but can lead to distortion of tissue and vision obstruction in nearly 10 percent cases.

Problematic hemangiomas have been treated with corticosteroids like dexamethasone and prednisone since the 1960s but steroids can fail at times and their action mechanism against hemangioma has remained a mystery.

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Translational Research Program at Children’s Hospital Boston, a Harvard Skin Diseases Pilot Study Grant, Sheba Medical Center (Israel), and the John Butler Mulliken Foundation.

Monday 29, Mar 2010

  Modeling of infant birth defect using stem cells

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Hemangiomas, the strawberry-like birthmarks, which tend to develop during early infancy are usually harmless but may result in tissue distortion or destruction and sometimes obstruction of vision or breathing in 10 percent cases. These problematic hemangiomas have been treated with corticosteroids such as dexamethasone or prednisone since the 1960s but steroids are not always effective and may lead to side effects.

According to a new research, led by dermatologist Shoshana Greenberger, MD, PhD, working in the lab of Joyce Bischoff, PhD, in Children’s Vascular Biology Program, steroids tend to interfere with hemangioma stem cells, a much rarer and more primitive cell type