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Friday 19, Nov 2010

  Time for drug cheats in sports will have tough times ahead

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Time for drug cheats in sports will have tough times aheadScientists at the University of Nottingham have come up with a new detection system that could be used to test athletes for performance enhancing drugs.

Professor Colin Snape in the University’s School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering, leading the study said identification of this method to produce easy-to-handle molecules without destruction of their carbon source highlights opening up of the complete molecules in the body to intense scientific scrutiny.

The research was published recently in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry.

Tuesday 05, Oct 2010

  New detection system in place for performance enhancing drugs

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New detection system in place for performance enhancing drugsA new detection system that can be used for testing athletes for performance enhancing drugs is presently being developed by scientists at the University of Nottingham.

The research, being led by Professor Colin Snape in the University’s School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering and published recently in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, is expected to offer a more reliable way to detect drug molecules in the body.

From News-medical.net:

In collaboration with Dr Mark Sephton at the Open University, Professor Snape’s research group has developed a technique called hydropyrolysis, commonly used to aid oil exploration by liberating small fragments of organic matter from petroleum rock sources. The modified process can recognise the origin of any carbon-based molecules, including fatty acids and steroids, in the body.

The type of carbon in the body’s molecules reflects the carbon ingested as part of an athlete’s diet. Drugs manufactured in the lab contain very different carbon, allowing the two types of molecules to be distinguished by scientific instruments.

However, previous techniques have been unable to offer a precise detection method. Professor Snape explained: “In effect, you are what you eat plus a little bit of what you might inject. In their natural form, however, the body’s molecules are too ‘sticky’ for accurate measurements by our laboratory equipment.”

Some methods overcome these problems but add carbon to the target molecule, irreversibly overprinting the carbon source ‘signal’. The research into hydropyrolysis, funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, has developed a new approach that delicately strips molecules of their ‘sticky’ parts but retains the carbon skeleton intact, allowing easy detection of the carbon source.

It was added by Professor Snape that the discovery of this method for producing easy-to-handle molecules without destruction of their carbon source signals opening up of the complete molecules in the body to intense scientific scrutiny.

Saturday 31, Jul 2010

  New technique identification by researchers

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New technique identification by researchersA new technique meant to prevent doping in sports has been identified according to a finding revealed by a research published in the journal Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry.

This technique has the potential of identifying the presence of natural and synthetic steroids in the body.

The technique was formulated by scientists from Imperial College London and the University of Nottingham and could be used by anti-doping officials to examine cheating in sports.

Monday 15, Feb 2010

  New anti-doping technique to prevent doping in sports

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New anti-doping technique to prevent doping in sportsA new technique that can help anti-doping officials to identify cheating in sporting events has been developed by scientists from Imperial College London and the University of Nottingham.

This finding was disclosed in a research published in the journal Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry.

The technique has the potential of identifying the presence of naturally occurring and synthetically manufactured steroids in the human body.

Tuesday 24, Nov 2009

  Use of banned substances by athletes possible of being identified by new technique

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Use of banned substances by athletes possible of being identified by new technique  As per the findings of a research that was published in the journal Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, a new technique (hydropyrolysis) can provide a long jump forward when it comes to identifying use of banned substances by athletes.

It is considered that this technique would provide improved insights to sporting drug officials for distinguishing between naturally-producing and synthetically-producing steroids.

This study is considered to provide invaluable insights to the involved researchers trying new ways to inhibit the use of steroids in sports.

 

 

 


Tuesday 18, Aug 2009

  New Technique can prove effective for spotting use of banned substances

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New Technique can prove effective for spotting use of banned substancesAccording to a research published today in the Journal Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, a new technique can offer a new dimensional approach in spotting use of banned substances by athletes.

This technique is expected to help doping staff and drug officials to distinguish between the presence of synthetically manufactured and naturally occurring human steroids in the body. It is interesting to note here that though naturally occurring and synthetic steroids are somehow similar in nature, there seems to be a difference in the ratio of ‘heavy’ carbon to ‘light’ carbon they contain.

From News-Medical.Net:

The new approach, developed by scientists from Imperial College London and the University of Nottingham, allows easy analysis of the carbon ratio. It uses a catalytic reaction to strip steroids of their more aggressive parts whilst leaving the carbon ‘skeleton’ intact. This technique, called hydropyrolysis, is commonly used to aid oil exploration by freeing small fragments of organic matter from petroleum rock sources.

Dr Mark Sephton, from Imperial’s Department of Earth Science and Engineering and lead author of the research, explained: “The type of carbon in the body’s molecules reflects the carbon ingested as part of an athlete’s diet, and if you can work out the carbon ratio in the molecules you can determine the source of the carbon.

“Drug cheats should beware. The carbon-based secrets of steroids are now apparent to the analyst. Thanks to our technique, in the future it will be much more difficult to escape detection when using performance-enhancing steroids“, he added.

The next step of researchers is to extend the present findings onto pure samples of steroid molecules. It is believed that the new technique will help in curbing use of steroids in sports to enhance the image of sports, which has been tarnished by steroid-taking athletes and other sportsmen in the last few years.

Saturday 11, Jul 2009

  New Steroid Test Based On Oil Exploration Technique

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New Steroid Test Based On Oil Exploration TechniqueResearchers at the University of Nottingham have developed a new, highly sensitive, anti-doping steroid test using hydropyrolysis. It’s a technique that has previously been used for oil exploration. The technique is also used to refine current radio carbon dating processes using carbon 14 isotope.

The process uses high pressure environments to investigate the chemical structure and make-up of a sample. It is refined at the University to develop highly accurate tests for detecting levels of illicit steroids in urine.

The same process can be used to detect the presence of illicit steroids in the urine of athletes - and racehorses. The test procedure is already in the process of being commercialized and is expected to be ready for use in the 2012 Olympics.

Friday 26, Jun 2009

  Latest Steroid Test makes use of Oil Exploration Methods

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Latest Steroid Test makes use of Oil Exploration MethodsResearchers at the University of Nottingham have formulated a highly sensitive anti-doping steroid test that makes use of hydropyrolysis which was used in the past for oil exploration.

Hydropyrolysis is a process that makes use of high pressure environments to identify and investigate the chemical structure of a sample to detect levels of illicit steroids in urine. This test is expected to be used in the 2012 Olympics.

The study was funded by the Natural Environment Research Councils Ocean Margins LINK program. Colin Snape, Professor of Chemical Technology and Chemical Engineering at the University, remarked that though steroids are naturally produced in the human body, they tend to have a varying carbon 13/carbon 12 ratios to those introduced in an illicit manner.

Snape further remarked that researchers can investigate and come with an accurate test to identify the presence of illegal steroids in bodies of athletes and racehorses via refinement of measurement of the carbon 12 and carbon 13 isotopes.