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Tuesday 04, Jun 2013

  Doping Still A Threat To Australian Sport

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Doping Still A Threat To Australian Sport

Australia’s crime fighters have remarked that the controversial drugs in sport report has been vindicated by record seizures of performance enhancing drugs. The Australian Crime Commission (ACC) has revealed that imports of banned drugs into Australia have dropped since the release of its drugs in sport report.

The Australian Crime Commission was criticized for a lack of specifics when it released a report as many clubs and individuals complained all sportspeople were tainted by the finding that performance enhancing drugs in sport were widespread and linked with organized crime. However, Justice Minister Jason Clare says fresh figures released in the ACC’s illicit drugs report show the sport report was justified. The report said the high profit illegal industry was thriving and the number of detections for performance and image enhancing drugs was 8726 in 2011/12, a rise from 5561 the year before. Clare remarked when the (drugs in sport) report was released earlier this year we made the point that there had been something like a 200 per cent increase in the importation of some performance and image enhancing drugs and we have seen a drop in importations interestingly in the last few months, which shows the impact of the release of that report only a few months ago.

The comments came as six rugby league players were banned for drug use for a period of two years. Four of the players – Matthew Lennon and Matthew Tailford (Sandgate Brighton Gaters) and Johnathon Matters and Jarrod Knox (Aspley) – all gave positive tests after playing in the QRL Brisbane second division grand final at Langlands Park on September 8 while the others were Andrew Zaro (Sunshine Coast Sea Eagles, tested on August 26) and Benjamin Morgan (James Cook University Saints, tested on September 16).  All the six lower grade Queensland rugby league players tested positive in August or September last year to methylhexaneamine, a stimulant banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

Clare said these are drugs which are dangerous and the athletes that have been banned in Queensland for the use of performance enhancing drugs were using a drug which has the potential to kill people and added that we have seen an example of that last year in the London marathon. Meanwhile, ACC chief executive John Lawler said doping remained a threat to Australian sport.

The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) warned the stimulant, found in some supplements, posed big health risks that people may not be aware of. Since August 1, 2012, Methylhexaneamine – also called DMAA, dimethylamylamine or 1,3-dimethylpentylamine – has been listed on the Therapeutic Goods Administration’s poisons standard. ASADA said the purpose of this was to prohibit the sale, supply or use of this substance because of its known potential harm to human health and added ASADA encourages any athlete who may still have products containing methylhexaneamine purchased prior to 1 August 2012, to dispose of these accordingly. It issued a warning on its website that since 2010 athletes had been banned from using the following methylhexaneamine-containing supplements – Jack3d, White Lightning, Hemo Rage, OxyELITE Pro and Thermo Jet.

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Saturday 09, Feb 2013

  Athlete Doping Condemned By Doctors

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Athlete Doping Condemned By Doctors

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) says doctors who have broken “ethical and professional” rules by supplying athletes with banned drugs must answer to their own consciences. The statement came in the wake of a government investigation that has found widespread use of banned drugs in Australian professional sport and links with organized crime.

The report of a year-long investigation identified medical practitioners as one of the key agencies where athletes access substances such as performance and image enhancing drugs (PIEDs). It added that doctors with links to sporting clubs and anti-aging clinics were participating in fraudulent practices like writing scripts with false names and prescribing hormones without necessary blood tests.

Chair of the AMA council of general practice, Dr Brian Morton said, we do not support general practitioners that do not take part in good medical practice that means looking after the health of patients and these practitioners have their conscience, ethical and professional standards to answer to. Dr Brian added that doctors participating in inappropriate practice face serious legal consequences and issued a warning of the health risks associated with experimenting with peptides and hormones or administering substances that are untested or approved for human use.

Dr Morton added that athletes expose them to high risk and it is also not acceptable if the patient is not fully aware of what they’re taking and further added that medication should only be used with good evidence-based work to support the safe use of drugs. He also remarked that it was disappointing to find out that sports scientists were also implicated of wrong-doing in the investigation and said it is a very sad day if ethical standards have dropped, whether it be sports scientists, coaches, athletes or medical practitioners.

Recently, a year-long investigation found the use of banned drugs in Australian professional sport is “widespread.” Without naming any individuals, the Australian Crime Commission (ACC) said scientists, coaches and support staff were involved in the provision of drugs across multiple sporting codes. The commission said, in its report, it looked at the use of a new form of PIEDs (performance and image enhancing drugs) known as peptides and hormones, which offer effects similar to anabolic steroids and added that widespread use of these substances has been identified, or is suspected by the ACC, in a number of professional sporting codes in Australia. This report also suggested that the use of illicit drugs in some sports was thought to be “significantly higher” than official statistics showed and organized crime syndicates were involved in the distribution of the banned substances.

Meanwhile, the Aussie rules Australian Football League (AFL) and the National Rugby League (NRL) have said they are already working with the commission.

Sports organizations would be encouraged to establish “integrity units” and engage the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Agency and law enforcement agencies to root out the problem, Sports Minister Kate Lundy said. Home Affairs Minister Jason Clare said the findings were “shocking and will disgust Australian sports fans” and the president of the World Anti-Doping Agency, John Fahey, described them as “alarming” but not a surprise.

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