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Saturday 31, Dec 2011

  Diabetes risk increase with inhaled steroids

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Inhaling corticosteroids can elevate chances of being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, according to investigators from the Jewish General Hospital’s Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research (LDI) in Montreal.

The investigators’ findings suggested that asthmatics and those suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) taking corticosteroids may be at a considerable risk.

The study was published in the American Journal of Medicine.

Tuesday 27, Dec 2011

  Some individuals may respond differently to asthma medications

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Some people affected with asthma may not be able to respond in the same way as others to inhaled steroids that are used for long-term asthma control.

The finding was revealed in a medical study released online on Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The findings were introduced at the European Respiratory Society Congress in Amsterdam.

Sunday 28, Nov 2010

  Stubborn asthma may indicate poor use of medications

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Stubborn asthma may indicate poor use of medicationsFindings of a new study have indicated that patients afflicted with difficult-to-control asthma are often not taking their anti-asthma medication as prescribed by their doctor.

Dr. Liam G. Heaney at Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland, and colleagues found that about 5 percent of adults with asthma remain difficult to control, with persistent symptoms and frequent flare-ups even with they were prescribed high doses of steroids.

Heaney and colleagues concluded that asthma could probably improve substantially if patients emphasize upon regular preventative therapy (as prescribed).

Wednesday 25, Aug 2010

  Identification of cells mediating steroid-resistant asthma

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Identification of cells mediating steroid-resistant asthmaCells that could possibly play an important role in some forms of steroid-resistant asthma, a complication of the condition that makes treatment even more challenging, have been identified by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

Study’s senior author, Jay K. Kolls, MD, chief of the Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, Allergy and Immunology at Children’s Hospital, remarked that the identification of a lineage of cells called as T Helper Type 17 (Th17) could assist scientists in developing new treatments for exercising a better control on the disease.

The study was published in an issue of the Journal of Immunology.

Wednesday 07, Jul 2010

  Potential treatment for hay fever and asthma identified

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Potential treatment for hay fever and asthma identifiedA potential drug has been identified and about to undergo trials in humans for treating hay fever and asthma.

The drug, RPL554, apparently has the ability to effectively treat respiratory diseases and does not lead to side effects that are usually common characteristics of many of the currently used medications.

It was remarked by Dr. Clive Page, chairman of Verona Pharma, which is developing the treatment, that his company is also ascertaining other novel compounds to tackle respiratory diseases on the lines of anti-inflammatory substances found in starfish and a treatment for coughs.

Tuesday 29, Jun 2010

  Asthma may effect black teens more than the whites

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Asthma may effect black teens more than the whitesBlack teenagers are more likely to develop steroid-resistant asthma than their white counterparts, according to a research conducted at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center.

It was disclosed in the study that black asthmatic teens are more likely to be sick and suffer from a higher mortality rate than white teens with asthma.

African-American children are prone to steroid-resistant asthma, according to Joseph Spahn, M.D., a pediatric allergist and director of the Immunopharmacology Lab at National Jewish.

The study was published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Monday 21, Jun 2010

  Asthma patients get extended relief with inhaled steroids

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Asthma patients get extended relief with inhaled steroidsAdults and children afflicted with asthma can exercise better control over the disease with inhaled corticosteroids than with cromolyn, according to a study conducted by James Guevara, M.D., of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and colleagues.

The researchers made comparisons between inhaled corticosteroids and cromolyn to find the better between the two for providing relief to patients with asthma.

It was revealed by the study that adults and children with asthma and treated with inhaled steroids experienced three fewer severe asthma flare-ups each year on an average and made less use of asthma inhalers when compared to asthma patients treated with cromolyn.

Friday 18, Jun 2010

  Inhaled steroids could be used by pregnant women

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Inhaled steroids could be used by pregnant womenAsthmatic women who are pregnant can continue using their asthma medications without having a concern about steroids affecting growth of their unborn babies, as per a study.

The involved researchers revealed that unborn babies are in far more danger of oxygen deprivation than the mother making use of inhaled steroids.

Results of the study appeared in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Tuesday 08, Jun 2010

  Some children may not respond as others when treated with asthma medications

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Some children may not respond as others when treated with asthma medicationsSome children with asthma may not be able to derive the same benefits with inhaled corticosteroids as other asthmatic children, as per a new study presented at the American Thoracic Society.

It was found in a study of 914 children with mild to severe asthma that children reporting consistent use of inhaled steroids were 20 percent less likely to report having well-managed asthma than those not using any kind of inhaled steroids, over a period of one year.

The data comes from the Child Asthma Management Program Continuation Study (CAMPCS), one of the largest groups of children with mild to moderate asthma in the nation who were followed for a period of over ten years.

Friday 28, May 2010

  Asthma management in children improves by physical fitness

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Asthma management in children improves by physical fitnessAccording to a study published recently in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), children suffering from asthma and into physical fitness are more likely to exercise a better control on the disease and improve their quality of life.

The results show aerobic training as an effective option for improving cardiopulmonary fitness and reducing daily use of inhaled steroids in children with asthma.

Celso Carvalho, Ph.D., an author on the study, said physical training can be a management strategy for symptoms of asthma in children.

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