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Sunday 23, May 2010

  Pregnant women with asthma can use inhaled steroids

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Pregnant women with asthma can use inhaled steroidsAccording to a study, women who are pregnant and suffering from asthma can use inhaled steroids without worrying about steroids affecting the growth of their babies.

It was disclosed by the involved researchers that the baby is in more danger of oxygen deprivation than his/her mother making use of inhaled steroids.

The results of this study appeared in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Friday 21, May 2010

  Inhaled and oral steroids influence the risk of cataract

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Inhaled and oral steroids influence the risk of cataractThe use of steroids (corticosteroids) in association with the risk of cataract was recently examined by a study conducted by the Centre for Vision Research, University of Sydney, Australia.

This population-based study, a cohort of the Blue Mountains Eye Study, examined 3,654 Australians, aged 49 years or older, five and 10 years after initial (baseline) examinations were conducted between 1992 and 1994.

It was remarked by lead researcher, Jie Jin Wang, MMed, PhD, Centre for Vision Research that combined use of steroids in cumulatively high doses could raise risks for two types of cataract.

Thursday 20, May 2010

  More asthma symptoms linked with low levels of Vitamin D

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More asthma symptoms linked with low levels of Vitamin DLow vitamin D levels share a relationship with lower lung function and greater medication use in children affected with asthma, as per researchers at National Jewish Health in a paper published online in the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology.

It was reported by Daniel Searing, MD, and his colleagues that vitamin D has the ability to improve the activity of corticosteroids, which are considered to be the most effective of all asthma control medications.

Dr. Leung said that the work suggested that vitamin D improves the anti-inflammatory function of corticosteroids.

Sunday 16, May 2010

  COPD patients using inhaled steroids at risk for severe pneumonia

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COPD patients using inhaled steroids at risk for severe pneumoniaMedical practitioners generally recommend inhaled steroids to patients affected by Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) but a study has found out that these anti-inflammatory drugs could increase the risk of pneumonia.

It was remarked by the researchers that present inhaled corticosteroid use was linked with a significant 70 percent increase in the risk of being hospitalization for pneumonia. This remark came after evaluating a large cohort of patients with COPD.

These findings were reported in the second issue of the July American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Thoracic Society.

Thursday 13, May 2010

  Once a day treatment with RPL554 for asthma and hay fever patients

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Once a day treatment with RPL554 for asthma and hay fever patientsA new drug, RPL554, was recently found to be effective in treating asthma and hay fever and is about to undergo trials in humans.

The drug, apparently, has the capability of effectively treating respiratory diseases and is without side effects that are regular features with many of the presently available drugs.

Dr. Clive Page, chairman of Verona Pharma, which is developing the treatment, said that the company is also evaluating other novel compounds for tackling respiratory diseases based on anti-inflammatory substances found in starfish and a treatment for coughs.

Friday 07, May 2010

  Inhaled steroids for asthma may provide little benefit for some children

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Inhaled steroids for asthma may provide little benefit for some childrenAccording to a new study presented at the American Thoracic Society, some children suffering from asthma may find it difficult to keep their asthma under control with inhaled corticosteroids.

In a study of 914 children with mild to severe asthma, it was found that children who reported consistent use of inhaled steroids were 20 percent less likely to report having well-controlled asthma compared with those not using any inhaled steroids, over a period of one year.

The data comes from the Child Asthma Management Program Continuation Study (CAMPCS), one of the largest groups of children with mild to moderate asthma in the nation who have been followed over a period of 10 years.

Saturday 01, May 2010

  Research findings presented on asthma

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Research findings presented on asthmaResearchers examining inhaled steroids and children suffering from asthma, as well as asthma and obesity have presented their findings from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Asthma Clinical Research Networks at the American Thoracic Society 2007 International Conference in San Francisco.

Wayne Morgan, M.D., of the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson, presented new data at the ATS meeting, said that asthma can be controlled but cannot be eliminated.

Two of these presentations consisted of new research findings from the Prevention of Early Asthma in Kids (PEAK) study, which is examining the effect of inhaled corticosteroid therapy on asthmatic children.

Thursday 22, Apr 2010

  Senior citizens at risk for unattended asthma

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Senior citizens at risk for unattended asthmaA recent study of elderly people at John Hopkins found that many of them have either moderate or severe asthma, which has been under-diagnosed or unattended.

Karen Huss, DNSc, RN, a nurse researcher and associate professor at The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, said asthma can result in reduced quality of life for elderly people.

The study was supported by the Fund for Geriatric Medicine and Nursing of The Johns Hopkins University and by Greer Laboratories, Inc. Other authors were P.L. Naumann, MSN; P.J. Mason, MSN; P.P. Nanda, MPH; R.W. Huss, M.D., C.M. Smith, BS; and R.G. Hamilton, PhD.

Monday 12, Apr 2010

  Birth of baby girl may mean worsening of asthma among pregnant women

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Birth of baby girl may mean worsening of asthma among pregnant womenPregnant women carrying a girl child and suffering from asthma are at an increased risk of experiencing worsening asthma symptoms than pregnant women carrying a boy child, as per a study presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference in Orlando on May 25.

Lead researcher Peter G. Gibson, M.D., said that while the reason behind this difference is still unknown, it may be because the female fetus can produce a substance in response to asthmatic mother’s airway inflammation leading to worsening of asthma.

Dr. Gibson, Professor in the Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine at Hunter Medical Research Institute at John Hunter Hospital in Newcastle, Australia, remarked that the good news is that asthma among pregnant women can be controlled with asthma treatment.

Monday 29, Mar 2010

  Combo inhaler effective for simplifying asthma treatment

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Combo inhaler effective for simplifying asthma treatment  A new treatment option may help people with chronic asthma to manage their condition with a single prescribed inhaler that contains two medicines, as per a review.

Lead reviewer Christopher Cates, M.D., at the Community Health Sciences of St. George’s at the University of London, said that most asthma patients default on inhaled corticosteroids as inhaled steroids do not bring immediate difference to asthma symptoms.

Carlos Camargo, M.D., an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, specializes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, remarked that this single-inhaler therapy is an interesting approach to treat chronic asthma.

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