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Sunday 01, Sep 2013

  Steven Andrus Accepts Sanction For Doping, Cyclist Cesar Lopez Suspended

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Steven Andrus Accepts Sanction For Doping, Cyclist Cesar Lopez Suspended

The United States Anti-Doping Agency has suspended wrestler Steven Andrus for one year for doping violation. The 22-year-old wrestler from Michigan tested positive for a marijuana metabolite (tetrahydrocannabinol acid) and amphetamine in the class of non-specified stimulants as the result of a sample collected on April 21, 2012 at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Iowa City, Iowa. Andrus revealed that the amphetamine came from an ADHD medication but was not granted approval for using the medication during competition.

Both substances are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles (FILA) Anti-Doping Rules and both of which have adopted the WADA code and the World Anti-Doping Code Prohibited List.

A one-year period of ineligibility was accepted by Andrus that started on May 25, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional sanction. He has been disqualified (including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes) from his competitive results achieved on and subsequent to April 21, 2012, the day he offered his sample.

Andrus was placed second at the 2012 United States Olympic Team Trials in the 120 kg/264.5 pounds Greco-Roman division at Carver-Hawkeye Arena after being selected as a wildcard. The Michigan State Spartan junior received one of two wildcard selections to compete in the United States Olympic Team Trials. The wrestler qualified for his first career trip to the NCAA Championships this past season and finished with a 24-16 record for Michigan State University and considered one of the strongest Greco-Roman wrestlers in the country. However, Andrus fell to 2008 Olympian Dremiel Byers of the U.S. Army in the championship match to end the chances of Andrus to make the 2012 London Olympic roster and the wrestler finished second at the Trials after being invited as a wildcard and proved his talent in Greco-Roman wrestling. He qualified for the 2011 Pan American Championships in Rionegro, Colombia last summer but withdrew from the tournament due to injury. In summer 2010, Andrus won both the FILA Junior Greco-Roman National Championships and the FILA Greco-Roman World Team Trials in Budapest, Hungary.

In another development, the USADA has suspended cyclist Cesar Lopez for three months after he was found doping. The 18-year-old Lopez, from El Paso, Texas, tested positive to marijuana in a sample collected on July 13 at the Junior Track Nationals in Trexlertown, Pennsylvania. Lopez tested positive for carboxy-THC, a marijuana metabolite in the class of Cannabinoids that are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Cycling Union (UCI) Anti-Doping Rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the WADA Prohibited List. A three-month period of ineligibility that started on August 2, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional sanction and he has been disqualified from his competitive results achieved on July 13, 2012, the day his sample was collected, through and including August 30, 2012, the date he completed the doping education program, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

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Sunday 28, Oct 2012

  US Cycling Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Us cycling athlete accepts sanction

Roger Hernandez, of Miami, Fla., an athlete in the sport of cycling, has accepted a two-year suspension for an anti-doping rule violation, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The violation was based on a refusal by Hernandez to submit to a sample collection. The 45-year-old Hernandez refused to take part in an In-Competition doping control test on July 29, 2011 at the Masters Track Nationals in Trexlertown. The refusal of an athlete to provide a sample when notified that he has been selected for doping control constitutes a rule violation under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Cycling Union (UCI) Anti-Doping Rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

A two- year period of ineligibility was accepted by Hernandez that began on August 21, 2011 the day after he last competed. The cycling athlete is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to July 29, 2011, the date upon which he refused to submit to sample collection, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the sanction.

Roger Hernandez is a body builder and a cycling champion with numerous titles. The athlete finished second in the keirin state final, won a world masters title in 2003, and headed to Portugal with intent on winning again. During day 4 of the USA Cycling Masters Track Nationals in Trexlertown, PA (July 29, 2011), Roger Hernandez of the Nitroshot cycling team came third behind Todd Hayes and Kirk Whiteman with a time of 11.607.

After the suspension of Hernandez, USA Cycling adjusted results from the 2011 Masters Track National Championships. Michael Miller of Morgantown, Pa., also accepted a suspension for anti-doping violation. The 42-year-old Miller tested positive for methylhexaneamine, a stimulant, as a result of a sample collected at the Masters Track Nationals, on July 27, 2011, in Trexlertown and accepted an eight-month period of ineligibility, which began on September 2, 2011, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. Methylhexaneamine is classified as a Specified Substance, and therefore the presence of that substance in an athlete’s sample can result in a reduced sanction. Miller is also disqualified from all results obtained during the Masters Track Nationals, which began on July 26, 2011, as well as any other competitive results obtained subsequent to July 26, 2011, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes.

The game of cycling is noticing some bad examples for the game in the last few months. A few months back, seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong was stripped of all his titles and banned for life by the United States Anti-doping Agency. This was after the cyclist was accused by former teammates of using anabolic steroids, human growth hormone, EPO, cortisone, and other performance enhancing drugs during an illustrious career with the USPS cycling team. Floyd Landis, Taylor Hamilton, and Frankie Andreu said every one in the team knew that he was using performance enhancing drugs and Armstrong even once claimed that the UCI, governing body of cycling, has swept his positive test.

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Saturday 15, Sep 2012

  Paralympic Cycling Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Paralympic cycling athlete accepts sanction

Monica Bascio of Evergreen, Colorado, has accepted a sanction for her anti-doping rule violation, according to an announcement by the U.S. Anti-doping Agency (USADA). The 42-year-old Bascio is an athlete in the sport of Paralympic cycling and tested positive for Tuaminoheptane.

A urine sample of Bascio collected on May 26, 2012 at the UCI Para-cycling Road World Cup in Rome, Italy tested positive for Tuaminoheptane and she said that the positive drug test was the result of taking an over-the-counter medication containing Tuaminoheptane that is a prohibited substance under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Cycling Union(UCI) anti-doping rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”) and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List.

Tuaminoheptane is categorized as a Specified substance and an athlete can get a reduced sanction if he or she can prove that the source of the substance and that there was no intention to improve sport performance or mask the use of a performance enhancing drug. Tuaminoheptane is a nasal decongestant and a stimulant that is on the 2011 list of prohibited substances published by the World Anti-Doping Agency. In 2008, French rugby player Rabah Slimani, was found guilty of taking Tuaminoheptane for a cold.

The three-month period of ineligibility for Bascio began on May 26, 2012 and she has been disqualified from all competitive results achieved on and subsequent to May 25, 2012 the date the UCI Para-cycling Road World Cup event started, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

Bascio accepted a sanction for her anti-doping rule violation, according to the anti-doping agency. Bascio was last month selected for the US team and is a 15-time US hand cycling champion.

During the 2012 London Olympics, Bascio came second to Marianna “Muffy” Davis, of Salt Lake City, Utah in Women Individual H 1 3 Road Race Cycling. She finished only 33 seconds back of Davis.

Monica Bascio was paralyzed in a 1992 ski accident and represented the United States at the 2006 and 2010 Paralympic Winter Games in cross-country sit skiing. Thereafter, she moved to Santa Cruz, California, and enrolled at San Jose State University to earn a degree in occupational therapy in 1998. The world champion hand cyclist spent five years in the national team before she made a transition to Nordic skiing in 2002. Monica Bascio started skiing on the World Cup circuit in February of 2004 and competed in her first Paralympic Winter Games in 2006. Bascio notched three top-10 finishes in the 2.5k, 5k, and 10k events in Torino. Her achievements include gold medal in 2011 H3-4 road race, ninth place in 10k at Parapan American Games, Guadalajara, Mexico 2010, tenth place in 5k at the Paralympic Games, Vancouver, Canada 2010, and the first place in 5k U.S. Cross Country Championships 2007. Working as an occupational therapist, Monica Bascio bagged the seventh place in 5k at the Paralympic Winter Games, Torino, Italy 2006 and the 10k silver medal at the World Cup Finals 2004.

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Saturday 01, Sep 2012

  Tyler Hamilton To Reveal All About Armstrong

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Tyler Hamilton To Reveal All About Armstrong – Cliff Notes

Tyler Hamilton dopingFormer American professional road bicycle racer, @Tyler Hamilton, is all set to tell all about Lance Armstrong doping in his soon-to-be-released book, “The Secret Race. Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France, Doping, Cover-ups and Winning at All Costs.”

In the book, Hamilton has claimed that Lance Armstrong gave him an illegal blood booster before the 1999 Tour de France. He added that the teammates took blood transfusions together during the race the following year. The two cyclists rode together on the U.S. Postal Service team from 1998 to 2001.

The Secret Race. Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France, Doping, Cover-ups and Winning at All Costs,” is set to be published on September 5.

Fourteen years of Armstrong’s competitive results, including his seven Tour de France titles have been erased by the U.S. Anti-doping Agency (USADA) after Armstrong not to fight drug charges of doping.

Hamilton went on to claim that a doping plan was put in place by the team during the 1999 Tour de France and Lance had knowledge of it. The plan included a motorcyclist riding behind racers with a thermos full of EPO that was meant to be dispended to team camper riders after race stages. It was further added that doctors, managers, and team leaders encouraged and supervised doping and use of performance enhancing drugs that were handed out to cyclists in white lunch bags. Hamilton also said after the 11th stage of the 2000 Tour de France, Lance and he sat near each other to take a blood transfusion under the watchful eye of team director Johan Bruyneel before the famous Ventoux mountain stage. He also said Lance told him that he tested positive for EPO at the 2001 Tour of Switzerland but was able to cover it up from the International Cycling Union.

“(Armstrong) took what we all took… there was EPO (erythropoietin)… testosterone… a blood transfusion,” Hamilton said in that interview. It was further alleged by Hamilton that a key Armstrong lieutenant during his seven Tour victories, former Postal rider George Hincapie, was also offered performance enhancing drugs while he rode for the team along with rider Kevin Livingston.

Hamilton won the time-trial at the Athens Olympics in 2004 and tested positive for blood doping but was allowed to keep his medal after the laboratory accidently destroyed his B sample by deep freezing it. In 2005, he tested positive for a blood transfusion and was banned for a period of two years. Tyler Hamilton was also associated with the Spanish doping scandal dubbed “Operation Puerto” in 2006 before he tested positive for anabolic steroids three years later. He received an eight-year ban after admitting that he used an over-the-counter treatment for depression. In a letter sent to family and friends on May 20, 2011, Hamilton admitted that he made use of performance-enhancing drugs and broke the rules.

In 2010, a former team-mate and deposed Tour de France winner Floyd Landis also accused Armstrong of making use of performance enhancing drugs and teaching others on how to avoid getting caught.

 

 

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