31/03/2020 2:34 am Welcome to isteroids.com - BLOG

Saturday 13, Nov 2010

  Romero files lawsuit against supplement makers

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

romero-files-lawsuit-against-supplement-makersThe Philadelphia Phillies star, JC Romero, has filed a lawsuit against the manufacturers and distributors of nutritional supplements after he tested positive to a doping test.

Romero claimed that it was not him but the manufacturers and distributors of nutritional supplements who were responsible for his positive drug test.

.A suspension of 50 games was imposed on Romero after he tested positive for androstenedione but he was allowed to workout in spring training session but without being paid.

Tuesday 31, Aug 2010

  JC Romero filed lawsuit against supplement makers

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

JC Romero filed lawsuit against supplement makersThe Philadelphia Phillies star, JC Romero, has taken legal action against the manufacturers and distributors of nutritional supplements after he tested positive for steroid abuse.

It was alleged by Romero that it was not him, but the manufacturers and distributors of nutritional supplements who were responsible for his positive drug test.

Romero tested positive for androstenedione and was handed over a 50-game suspension but was allowed to workout in spring training session without being paid.

Friday 23, Oct 2009

  Congress examining supplements with steroids

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Congress examining supplements with steroidsThe Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently told the Congress that it had limited capabilities when it comes to preventing dietary supplements with steroids from hitting the market shelves.

The subcommittee chairman, Sen. Arlen Specter, a Pennsylvania Democrat and Philadelphia Phillies fan, remarked before the hearing was initiated that his interest was piqued in some part by the case of Phillies pitcher J.C. Romero, who was handed a suspension of 50 games this season, after being tested positive for Androstendione, a substance that was also used by Mark McGwire in the 1990s.

It is worth noting here that the Major League Baseball Players Association has been pressing the Congress to formulate stringent reporting requirements for supplement manufacturers and hard penalties for repeat offenders.

Thursday 30, Apr 2009

  J.C. Romero filed Lawsuit against Supplement Makers over His Positive Test

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

J.C. Romero filed Lawsuit against Supplement Makers over His Positive TestJ.C. Romero, the Philadelphia Phillies star who was suspended for steroid abuse last August, has taken legal action against the makers and distributors of nutritional supplements. The star pitcher alleged that they are responsible for his positive test.

Romero filed a 27-page lawsuit on Monday in New Jersey Superior Court in Camden County. In the lawsuit, he blamed the product 6-OXO Extreme for traces of androstenedione found in his urine on Aug. 26, 2008. The lawsuit also includes various other counts, including negligence, intentional misrepresentation and consumer fraud.

GNC, Vitamin Shoppe, Ergopharm and Proviant Technologies are the four defendants named under the lawsuit. Among these, the latter two companies are owned and operated by Patrick Arnold, an Illinois-based chemist who is in federal prison for having role in the BALCO affair. When asked about the lawsuit, Arnold did not give any statement.

Romero said, “I purchased an over-the-counter supplement that I was told and believed would not cause me to test positive.” “These events have hurt me deeply and placed a cloud over my career, accomplishments and family. It is my hope that I can finally start to put this event behind me and protect the interests of others who rely on manufacturers and retailers to be honest about their products.”

From New York Daily News:

Suspended Phillies reliever J.C. Romero is suing the makers and distributors of nutritional supplements that he says are responsible for his positive steroid test last August.

The 27-page lawsuit, filed Monday in New Jersey Superior Court in Camden County, blames the product 6-OXO Extreme for traces of androstenedione found in the pitcher’s urine on Aug. 26, 2008.

The numerous counts in the lawsuit include negligence, intentional misrepresentation and consumer fraud. The four defendants named are GNC, Vitamin Shoppe, Ergopharm and Proviant Technologies.

The star Phillies pitcher was tested positive for androstenedione on Aug. 26, 2008 and received a 50-game suspension order, which was not made public until January of this year. MLB announced his ban later in January. Despite of his suspension, Romero was allowed to work out with the Phillies in spring training session and in pregame practices without being paid.

Gary Wadler, a New York internist affiliated with the World Anti-Doping Agency stated that Romero situation had highlighted a well-known problem with the under-regulated supplement industry.

Saturday 10, Jan 2009

  A LOOK AT THE SUPPLEMENT BEHIND J.C. ROMERO’S SCANDAL

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

jcr-steroidsWhile still debating on who is really responsible for the mess J.C. Romero is in, we will now look at the supplement behind it all– 6-OXO Extreme.

In an interview with Cherry Hill’s fitness director Maurice “Mo” Orlando, he revealed that 6-OXO Extreme is widely being used by many bodybuilders and athletes. The supplement is not an anabolic steroid but its effects are the same of your common performance enhancing drug. This effect is made possible by 6-OXO’s ability to block estrogen so that there will be more testosterone available in your system.

Is 6-OXO Extreme legal? Yes, unlike other anabolic androgenic steroids, the supplement and its use are legal. In fact, it’s being sold all over the United States, in rather well-known health shops. It is not FDA-approved, however, and its safety is yet to be tested. To defend the legality of this supplement, GNC has released the following statement:

Proviant Technologies, the makers of 6-OXO, also released a statement saying that the supplement has no component that would make someone test positive for anabolic steroid use.

So why did J.C. Romero test positive? Dr. Bruce Sennett of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania speculates that the tests done on Romero didn’t pick up any illegal residue from the drug. It most probably picked up the elevated testosterone levels that the supplement had triggered. While this doesn’t really prove anything yet, for as far as health supplement goes, 6-OXO Extreme really is effective.

Thursday 08, Jan 2009

  J.C. Romero’s Side of the Story

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

jc-steroidsPhiladelphia Phillies reliever J.C. Romero chose to explain his side before the announcement of his 50-game suspension becomes public. He was charged for his negligence in taking over the counter  sporting supplements he had bought in a store in Cherry Hill. According to an arbitrator, Romero opted to take the supplements without even knowing what they were.

Romero recalls that he was intrigued by the new supplements being sold in the retail store where he bought his usual supplements. He went on to try these and even had his nutritionist check for any banned components in the product’s label. When the nutritionist he had been working with for several years had cleared the drug, Romero was sure he was not breaking any rules. When Phillies strength coach Dong Lien sent a sample of the supplement to Major League Baseball for testing, however, tests showed that the supplement contained a substance that could lead to a positive drug test reading. No one informed Romero though. It was only after his urine was tested when Romero had found out that there was a problem with the supplements he was taking. The question is who should really be labeled negligent?

Romero is convinced that he had done nothing wrong. According to Romero, he owes it to himself and to his supporters to speak the truth.

Romero better pray that his gut is right otherwise he would be facing a scandal that might tarnish the name he had worked so hard for to establish.