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Thursday 03, Apr 2014

  Dennis Siver Tests Positive For hCG

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Dennis Siver Tests Positive For hCG

Dennis D. Siver, the Russian-German mixed martial artist who competes in the featherweight division of the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), has tested positive for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG).

The naturally-occurring hormone in both males and females is on the banned substances’ list of many sports due to frequency in use with anabolic androgenic steroids. HCG is commonly used by male athletes and bodybuilders to boost testosterone production and may also be used to lose weight. It is used as a fertility drug by women.

According to a confirmation by Nevada State Athletic Commission chairman Francisco Aguilar, an “appropriate complaint” against the mixed martial artist was being prepared. It is believed Siver may serve a temporary suspension and will have the opportunity to make an appeal against the suspension. However, he may face a full suspension, a fine, and a potential overturning of his win over Manny Gamburyan at UFC 168 on December 28 in Las Vegas to a no-contest.

In a statement, Dennis Siver accepted for responsibility, but was adamant that it was not an effort on his part to knowingly dope for the fight. Siver said he would like to issue a public statement and give his fans and supporters the opportunity to form their own opinion on how the alleged doping allegations against me came about. He added he hired an external personal trainer and nutritionist before UFC 168 and the nutritionist recommended a new diet method from the US to him, which had been successfully used by the stars. Siver added he confirmed from the nutritionist if he could safely use this supplement and it was confirmed to him but he made the mistake of not making sure through the UFC if individual substances from the supplement could have effects on the drug tests. In the statement, Siver said the B sample revealed a small component of hCG in his urine sample – a minor ingredient of the diet preparation and a substance which is banned in the UFC.

Siver added he doesn’t want to blame anyone for this result and he takes full responsibility for his gullible and careless behavior. He also remarked it was his mistake and it was grossly negligent and he further remarked that he had distance himself from any kind of doping and added in his previous sixteen UFC fights, not even the smallest banned substance has been detected. Siver said this makes the current events all the more disappointing and shocking for him and his team.

Siver is #7 in official Ultimate Fighting Championship featherweight rankings. He started training in martial arts in 1994 when he started learning sambo, judo, kickboxing, and taekwondo. Dennis Siver became the WAKO amateur kickboxing champion of Germany in 1997 and was signed by the UFC after his win against Jim Wallhead at CWFC – Enter The Rough House. His victory against Nate Mohr at UFC 93 in Dublin was awarded the Knockout of the Night award where he managed to TKO his opponent via a spinning back kick and punches.

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Thursday 25, Apr 2013

  Athletes Often Misuse Protein Supplements

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Athletes Often Misuse Protein Supplements

According to a recent study, protein supplements don’t improve performance or recovery time and such supplements are inefficient for most athletes.

Martin Fréchette, a researcher and graduate of the Université de Montréal Department of Nutrition, said these supplements are often poorly used or unnecessary by both high-level athletes and amateurs.

Fréchette submitted questionnaires to 42 athletes as part of his thesis for the Masters degree. In the questionnaire, sportsmen were asked about their use of supplements while keeping a journal of their eating habits for three days and came from a variety of disciplines including biathlon, cycling, long-distance running, swimming, judo, skating, and volleyball. Nine out of 10 athletes reported food supplements on a regular basis and they consumed an average of 335 products: energy drinks, multi-vitamins, minerals, and powdered protein supplements. Fréchette found their knowledge of food supplements to be weak and remarked the role of proteins is particularly misunderstood and said only one out of four consumers could associate a valid reason, backed by scientific literature, for taking the product according.

Seventy percent of athletes in Fréchette’s study didn’t feel their performance would suffer if they stopped such consumption despite the widespread use of protein supplements and Fréchette said more than 66 percent of those who believed to have bad eating habits took supplements. For those who claimed to have ‘good’ or ‘very good’ eating habits that number climbs to 90 percent. He further stressed that supplements come with certain risks and contended that their purity and preparation aren’t as controlled as prescription medication and sports supplements often contain other ingredients than those listed on the label and some athletes consume prohibited drugs without knowing.

No less than 81 percent of athletes taking supplements already had sufficient protein from their diet, Fréchette said and added that the use of multivitamins and minerals can make up for an insufficient intake of calcium, folate yet not for lack of potassium. Other studies have shown that 12 to 20 percent of products that are regularly used by athletes include prohibited substances and a particular interest by the athletes on the efficiency, legality, and safety of those drugs was observed by Fréchette. The researcher and graduate of the Université de Montréal Department of Nutrition also remarked that consumers of supplements had levels of sodium, magnesium, niacin, folate, vitamin A and iron that exceeded the acceptable norms, which makes them susceptible to health problems such as nausea, vision trouble, fatigue and liver anomalies.

In another study, Tim Byers, MD, MPH, professor of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health and associate director for prevention and control at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, disclosed that Beta-carotene, selenium and folic acid have now been shown to increase the risk of developing a host of cancers. Byers added that we need to do a better job as a society in ensuring that the messages people get about value versus risk is accurate for nutritional supplements and also added that his conclusion is that taking high doses of any particular nutrient is more likely to be a bad thing than a good thing.

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Tuesday 24, Apr 2012

  Indian policemen in doping net

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In the 60th All India Police Athletics Championship held at the Jawaharlal Nehru stadium in New Delhi last month, six samples contained either anabolic steroids or a diuretic.

Results from the National Dope Testing Laboratory (NDTL) had revealed that six samples had stanozolol, nandrolone, methandienone (steroids), or the diuretic furosemide, according to the National Anti Doping Agency.

The athletes involved belong to Punjab Police, BSF, ITBP, CRPF, and Odisha Police.