07/12/2019 3:51 am Welcome to isteroids.com - BLOG

Tuesday 22, Aug 2017

  Justin Gatlin Issues First Public Apology Over Doping Past

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Justin Gatlin, the controversial 100 meter world champion, has made his first public apology about the furore caused by his doping bans.

The American sprinter said the booing he received at the recently-concluded London championships hurt but it helped motivate him to beat Usain Bolt. Gatlin has received criticism for reportedly not showing remorse for his actions associated with this two drug bans. In 2001, Gatlin was first banned for taking a banned supplement for Attention Deficit Disorder that he had been using since childhood. The sprinter received an early reinstatement by the world governing body of athletics the following year. In 2006, the sprinter was banned again after he tested positive for the steroid Testosterone. It was claimed by Gatlin that this was as a result of sabotage by a disaffected member of his team.

Gatlin disclosed he wrote a letter of apology to the International Association of Athletics Federations years ago and has no issues if a public apology was required. The sprinter said the letter he wrote, which came out in 2015, it was suppressed for almost six years and he is not sure who or why they suppressed it but he did apologized. Gatlin also remarked he started a program where he went and talked to kids and told them about the pitfalls of falling behind the wrong people, staying on the path, and doing the right things.  The sprinter said he apologize for any wrongdoings or any black eyes that he brought onto the sport. Gatlin also remarked he loves the sport and that is why he had made a return and try to run to the best of his ability and for that he had worked hard to right his wrongs.

Gatlin said he was hurt by the jeering and booing from the crowd in London when he was presented with a gold medal for the 100m World Championships. The American sprinter said it did hurt because he is not there for himself, he is up there for his country, he is up there for his supporters, and added he didn’t do it for himself. Gatlin said he was there for people back at home watching who were not able to come and commented that maybe the boos were for him but standing on the podium was for the people who have loved him and his country that he loves.

Gatlin remarked he had to overcome his concern about what people thought about him before he came back to running. The 100 meter world champion also said he wanted people to respect him, to love him, to know that he is a hard worker like anybody else. Gatlin also said he felt like sometimes that fell on deaf ears, and it took away from his focus of being a runner because he was so consumed by what people would think about him and judging him, that he really had to just dial-in and just focus on being a runner and let the natural talent do all the talking.

Gatlin is next due to compete at the Diamond League meeting in Zurich.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Justin Gatlin Issues First Public Apology Over Doping Past

Monday 01, Jun 2015

  Gatlin Rejects ‘Ridiculous’ Claims About Effects Of Steroids

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Gatlin Rejects ‘Ridiculous’ Claims About Effects Of Steroids

American sprinter Justin Gatlin has dismissed suggestions that he is still reaping benefits of anabolic androgenic steroids nearly a decade after taking them.

Gatlin recently clocked 19.68 seconds to win the 200m at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene. He was questioned for running the fastest times at age of 33.

Gatlin was responding to a question from a journalist who asked about a study on mice that revealed doping effects could still be felt long after exposure. The sprinter said he is not sure why people would match a laboratory mouse to a human being and added he believes this is ridiculous and unfathomable to him. Let’s Run journalist Weldon Johnson asked Gatlin how he could assure people that he is running clean now to which the sprinter responded there is no commentary and he had already said whatever he had to say.

Gatlin, a two-time convicted drugs cheat, was banned for two years from international competition in 2001 after he tested positive for amphetamines. The Olympic gold medalist in the 100 meters was banned in 2006 for four years after he tested positive for testosterone. Gatlin vehemently denied steroid allegations and claimed that a masseur rubbed a cream that contained the banned substance on his back, a claim that is refuted by the masseur.

He agreed to an eight-year ban on August 22, 2006 to avoid a lifetime ban in exchange and the United States Anti-Doping Agency surprisingly reduced his suspension because of the “exceptional circumstances” surrounding his drug test of 2001 and cooperation with the doping authorities.

Last summer, Gatlin ran the fastest 100m and 200m times by a man in his thirties. In Brussels last year, the American sprinter pulled off the fastest ever one-day sprint double when he clocked 9.77 seconds for the 100m an hour before running the 200m in 19.71. In Monaco, he had run 19.68 for the 200m.

Dai Greene, Britain’s 2011 400m hurdles world champion, remarked in 2014 that the recent success of Gatlin shows that either he is still taking performance-enhancing drugs to get the best out of him at his advanced age, or the ones he did take are still doing a fantastic job as there is no way he can still be running that well at this late point in his career. Greene remarked that 9.77 is an incredibly fast time after having years on the sidelines, being unable to train or compete, it doesn’t really add up.

Many athletes opposed nomination of Gatlin for the IAAF’s athlete of the year 2014 shortlist. Robert Harting, another nominee and Germany’s Olympic, world and European discus champion, asked for Gatlin’s name to be removed from the list in protest. Briton Darren Campbell, a former European 100m champion, also opposed the name of Gatlin and then remarked that if you did it artificially, you don’t know how you did it. In 2014, French pole vaulter Renaud Lavillenie and Valerie Adams, shot putter from New Zealand, were crowned the male and female World Athletes of the Year.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Gatlin Rejects ‘Ridiculous’ Claims About Effects Of Steroids

Friday 22, May 2015

  Justin Gatlin ‘Kicked Out’ By Beijing Meeting Organizers

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Justin Gatlin ‘Kicked Out’ By Beijing Meeting Organizers

American sprinter Justin Gatlin has stunned the world of athletics by saying that he was recently “kicked out” of the Beijing World Challenge by meeting organizers.

Gatlin, who has served two doping bans, was all set to race in China after he ran his fastest ever 100m time of 9.74 seconds in Doha. The 33-year-old was unsure about his fitness after a flight to Beijing but looked ready to compete after going through a training session. The sprinter remarked they did not have any respect for me so they said ‘you better leave’.” The sprinter’s manager Renaldo Nehemiah said the sudden departure of Gatlin from Beijing has nothing to do with this controversial reputation. Nehemiah remarked the meeting organizers think Gatlin is injured and they don’t want him here if he is injured. The former 110m hurdles world-record holder Renaldo Nehemiah said Gatlin is a man on a mission and he knows he has only so many races and years left so he’s making every one of them count. Nehemiah added people who aren’t students of the sport don’t realize he was a phenom before he ever got banned.

In reply, Organizers of the Beijing World Challenge denied kicking out Gatlin and remarked they were “perplexed” by claim of the athlete. The meeting’s organizing committee said there had been “no possibility” that they would have said no to the current top sprinter of the world to compete. Liu Jie, deputy director of the organizing committee, said we had been preparing the event assuming Gatlin would run the race and added that there was no way we ‘kicked out’ the athlete. Jie also said the sprinter’s manager did not communicate with us before he announced Gatlin’s withdrawal at the news conference and we never got to speak with Gatlin in person. The deputy director of the organizing committee also remarked that he had no idea that Justin Gatlin was returning back home without competing until he heard Gatlin’s manager announce it at the eve of meeting press conference.

A few hours later, Gatlin said “all is fine” with the Beijing track meet organizers. Gatlin tweeted from his private Twitter account late Tuesday night Eastern Time that he and Beijing Org have great relationship and look forward to being there in August “Worlds” & next year meet. Gatlin remarked he is looking forward to competing in the Pre Classic in Eugene, Oregon, on May 30 and said he is going to drop a bomb out there.

Gatlin, an Olympic gold medalist in the 100 meters, became the world leader of 2014 in the 200 meters when he won the Diamond League event in Monaco in 19.68 seconds.

Justin Gatlin is not new to controversies. His first run-in with the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) was apparently due to an attention-deficit drug he was taking since he was eight years old. In 2006, Gatlin was found to have excess Testosterone in his system and received a suspension of four years. However, Gatlin claimed innocence and insisted that the hormone was administered without his knowledge by a masseuse.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Justin Gatlin ‘Kicked Out’ By Beijing Meeting Organizers

Thursday 14, May 2015

  IOC Strips U.S. Relay Stripped Of Silver For Tyson Gay Doping

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

IOC Strips U.S. Relay Stripped Of Silver For Tyson Gay Doping

The International Olympic Committee have stripped the entire U.S. men’s sprint relay team of their silver medal from the 2012 London Olympics as a result of the doping case of Tyson Gay.

IOC notified the U.S. Olympic Committee that the 4×100 relay team has been disqualified and all the medals are to be withdrawn. In a letter, the International Olympic Committee asked USOC to collect the medals and return them to it.

In a statement, USOC spokesman Patrick Sandusky said the IOC, following USADA’s decision in the Tyson Gay case, confirmed that the U.S. team has been disqualified from the 4×100-meter race that was part of the athletics competition at the London 2012 Olympic Games. Sandusky also remarked that we will begin efforts to have the medals returned, and support all measures to protect clean athletes.

Last year, Tyson Gay returned his own medal after accepting a doping suspension of one year and the loss of results going back to July 2012. However, the status of the U.S. second-place finish in London and medals of relay teammates of Gay had remained in limbo until now. Tyson Gay was part of the USA Team that finished second in London behind a Jamaican team anchored by Usain Bolt. During this race, the Americans set a national record in the final with a time of 37.04 seconds.

Other U.S. team members losing medals are Trell Kimmons, Justin Gatlin, Ryan Bailey, Jeffery Demps, and Darvis Patton. In the final race, Kimmons, Gatlin, and Bailey ran with Gay.

Under International Rules, an entire team can be disqualified and stripped of medals if there is doping by one member.

If the IOC decides to reallocate the medals, the silver will now go to Trinidad and Tobago that finished third in 38.12 seconds and the bronze will come in the bag of the French team which placed fourth in 38.16 seconds.

The 31-year-old Gay tested positive for the presence of an exogenous androgenic anabolic steroid and/or its metabolites which was confirmed by CIR (GC/C/IRMS) analysis. Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the IAAF Anti-Doping Rules, Anabolic Androgenic Steroids are prohibited. The athlete accepted an ineligibility period of one year that began on June 23, 2013, the day his sample was collected at the USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships. He was disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to July 15, 2012 and returned his Silver Medal in the men’s 4x100m relay from the 2012 London Olympic Games that is now in the possession of the United States Olympic Committee.

Gay’s positive test resulted in an investigation that led to a ban of eight years for his former coach, Jon Drummond. During London Olympics, Drummond was the coach of the U.S. relay team and placed Tyson Gay on the team. A three-member panel of the American Arbitration Association North American Court of Arbitration for Sport (AAA) found Drummond guilty of possessing, trafficking, and administering banned performance enhancing substances to an athlete under his care as a coach. According to decision of the United States Anti-Doping Agency, Gay took a banned substance in July 2012 with knowledge of Drummond.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: IOC Strips U.S. Relay Stripped Of Silver For Tyson Gay Doping

Sunday 29, Mar 2015

  Nike Criticized For Justin Gatlin Deal

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Nike Criticized For Justin Gatlin Deal

Nike’s decision to sponsor Justin Gatlin has stirred controversy in elite running circles with many top athletes criticizing the deal.

Recently, Nike gave a new sponsorship deal to U.S. sprinter Justin Gatlin who has served a doping ban of four years from 2006 to 2010. In 2006, Nike dropped its initial sponsorship of Gatlin.

Last year, the 33-year-old was the fastest man in the world but many doubted that he will get such a lucrative contract after twice being banned for doping. The American sprinter, who is an Olympic gold medalist in the 100 meters, ran the fastest-ever time for a man over the age of 30 when he ran a time of 9.80 in June 2012 at the US Olympic trials. He went on to become the world leader in the 200 meters on July 18, 2014 when he won his race in 19.68 seconds at the Diamond League event in Monaco.

Jason Gardener, who helped Great Britain to the 4×100-meter relay title at the 2004 Athens Games, remarked nothing surprises me but this another bad message being sent by our sport. Jason pointed to mounting evidence that systematic dopers reaped long-term residual benefits from their cheating and they therefore should receive harsher punishments.

Olympic silver medalist Steve Backley questioned message of Nike to young athletes. Former heptathlete Kelly Sotherton hit out at the deal and remarked what sort of a message is that from Nike signing new sponsorship with multiple drugs cheat Justin Gatlin.

Paula Radcliffe, the world record holder in the women’s marathon who is sponsored by Nike, also expressed her displeasure and said she is very disappointed to hear this news and added that she does not believe it truly reflects the core values of the Nike she is proud to represent, nor the integrity and ideals of the people there that she works with on a daily basis.

In 2001, Justin Gatlin received a brief suspension for an amphetamine contained in an attention deficit disorder drug he had been taking since childhood. On appeal, his suspension was shortened. Gatlin received an eight-year sentence for using “testosterone or its precursor” in 2006 though the athlete denied ever using such a substance. It was claimed by Gatlin’s coach, Trevor Graham, that the athlete had been sabotaged by a massage therapist who rubbed a cream containing testosterone onto Justin Gatlin. His ban was later reduced to four years as he cooperated in providing information to doping authorities and the “exceptional circumstances” of his first ban.

Travis Tygart, the head of the United States Anti-Doping Agency, had remarked Justin Gatlin deserved a second chance after his drug ban. The USADA chief executive refused to read too much into reports that the use of steroids may have long-lasting benefits in an athlete’s body. He had remarked there is some recent science on the effect of steroids on mice, but there is no proof yet it translates to humans and went on to add that if somebody commits a violation, serves a ban and comes back to the sport, part of the rule is this idea of redemption.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Nike Criticized For Justin Gatlin Deal

Tuesday 14, Oct 2014

  Gatlin Hits Back At Doping Accusations

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Gatlin Hits Back At Doping Accusations

Former Olympic 100m champion Justin Gatlin has hit back at those who doubt the legitimacy of his unbeaten season. The US sprinter, who served a four-year ban after testing positive for excessive testosterone in 2006, said his fast times are due to “hard work and dedication”.

Gatlin, the fastest 100m runner in the world this year, rubbishes recently-concluded research into doping that was conducted on mice. The sprinter insisted his recent performances are based on ‘hard work’. Gatlin has not lost a 100m or 200m race this season and set a personal best of 9.77sec in 100m.

It was indicated recently by a research conducted on mice by the University of Oslo that muscles retain the advantages provided by anabolic steroids long after the doping has stopped. Kristen Gunderson, Professor of Physiology at the University of Oslo, said he believes it is likely that effects could be lifelong or at least lasting decades in humans. Gunderson added if you exercise, or take anabolic steroids, you get more nuclei and you get bigger muscles and if you take away the steroids, you lose the muscle mass, but the nuclei remain inside the muscle fibers. Professor Gunderson added they are like temporarily closed factories, ready to start producing protein again when you start exercising again.

Gatlin insisted that there is no evidence that it has any effect on humans and remarked any other suggestion is “discrediting” his name. The US sprinter said for the few haters out there, seems like that’s what they want to do, discredit his name and label him with laboratory rats in Oslo. He went on to remark that a lot of athletes that tested positive, they never came back and ran times close to the times they ran when they were positive and added he thinks that proves hard work and dedication on his behalf.

Last week, Lord Sebastian Coe revealed he had “big problems” with Gatlin being shortlisted for the IAAF male athlete of the year. Fellow nominee Robert Harting asked to be withdrawn from consideration due to the inclusion of Gatlin. Gatlin responded by saying that he did not ask to get nominated and added his choice was to run and win races and be dominant for himself. The US sprinter also remarked his job is not to go out and lose and his job is to win and that’s what he is supposed to do, like everyone else nominated. The former Olympic 100m champion said he is sad to say that a lot of people out there feel that, ‘Once a doper, always a doper’ and remarked but that makes no sense as that means you don’t believe your system is working.

In another development, Travis Tygart, chief executive of the United States Anti-Doping Agency has remarked that athletes banned for doping offences should be handed second chances. Tygart remarked Gatlin still deserves a shot at “redemption” despite serving two doping bans. Tygart told BBC Sport if somebody commits a violation, serves a ban and comes back to the sport, part of the rule is this idea of redemption and added that there is some recent science on the effect of steroids on mice, but there is no proof yet it translates to humans.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Gatlin Hits Back At Doping Accusations

Wednesday 08, Oct 2014

  Doping Effects Could Be Lifelong, Say Scientists

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Research by University of Oslo scientists has established that muscles of the body can retain the benefits provided by anabolic steroids decades after the point at which they were taken.

Findings of the research suggest that convicted dope cheats such as sprinter Justin Gatlin may still be benefiting from having taken banned drugs long after their bans have expired. The research data also casts shadow over once-banned athletes such as Tyson Gay of United States and Britain’s Dwain Chambers. This summer, Gatlin ran the fastest ever 100m and 200m times by an athlete in his thirties despite twice having served suspensions.

The study by University of Oslo scientists has huge implications for the present anti-doping system where an offender for the first time is unlikely to be suspended for more than two years and could actually serve less than half that.

Kristian Gundersen, Professor of Physiology at the University of Oslo, said he thinks it is likely that effects could be lifelong or at least lasting decades in humans. Gundersen added our data indicates the exclusion time of two years is far too short and even four years is too short.

The team of Gundersen studied the effect of steroids on female mice. Gundersen said he is convinced that the same mechanism is at work in muscles of humans and also added that other performance-enhancing drugs would have similar long-term benefits. Gundersen remarked he would be very surprised if there were any major differences between humans and mice in this context and also said the fundamental biology of muscle growth is similar in humans and in mice, and in principle any drug that builds muscle mass could trigger this mechanism. Gundersen also remarked if you exercise, or take anabolic steroids, you get more nuclei and you get bigger muscles and said if you take away the steroids, you lose the muscle mass, but the nuclei remain inside the muscle fibers.

The performances of Gatlin have caused disquiet in the athletics world. Dai Greene, Britain’s 2011 400m hurdles world champion, remarked Gatlin is over the hill as far as sprinting is concerned – he should never be running these times for the 100m and 200m. Greene added but he is still doing it, and you have to look at his past, and ask how it is still affecting him now, because the average person wouldn’t be able to do that. The 2011 400m hurdles world champion added those are incredible performances and not many people have run that fast separately, ever and further remarked it shows one of two things: either he’s still taking performance-enhancing drugs to get the best out of him at his advanced age, or the ones he did take are still doing a fantastic job.

Greene went on to remark that because there is no way he can still be running that well at this late point in his career and said after having years on the sidelines, being unable to train or compete, it doesn’t really add up – 9.77 is an incredibly fast time and you only have to look at his performances.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Doping Effects Could Be Lifelong, Say Scientists

Monday 11, Aug 2014

  Abnormal Test Findings On High In 2013

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Abnormal Test Findings On High In 2013

According to a report by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), the number of abnormal test findings recorded by anti-doping authorities worldwide increased by more than 20 percent last year.

It was revealed that there were 5,962 adverse or atypical test results across all sports in 2013, compared with 4,723 in 2012 while the number of tests carried out rose by only 0.8 percent in the same period. The WADA report revealed that 269,878 samples were analyzed in total across 35 Olympic and 58 non-Olympic sports, compared with 267,645 in 2012 and adverse or atypical findings were returned for 5,962 samples, or in 2.21 percent of cases. It was also disclosed that Olympic sports accounted for 65.4 percent of the tests conducted, but only 57.8 percent of the abnormal results. The report also revealed that football, athletics, and cycling conducted the most tests among Olympic sports but weightlifting and wrestling had the highest rate of adverse findings. It is surprising to note that adverse test results were recorded in sports as diverse as chess, bridge, and boccia.

The increase in abnormal results comes in a year when sports like tennis and football have stepped up their use of biological passport programs, which allows authorities to collect and compare biological data and spot discrepancies over a period of time to suggest possible doping. On the other hand, sports like cycling have tightened their grip on the ‘whereabouts rule’ that requires athletes to offer regular information about their location and possible windows for testing to authorities.

British 800m runner Jenny Meadows still feels drug takers in sport are still able to get away with it. She remarked people are still taking drugs and always will and added the margin of error between coming first and third is so tiny that people will always looks for ways to break that down. Meadows further remarked you look at Tyson Gay and Justin Gatlin lining up last week in the 100m and it makes you feel sick because they are still getting sponsorship and prize money and added it is not fair on the rest of us. The British 800m runner also said she does not think the sport is being cleaned up and these figures send out a message of ‘we’ll find you eventually’ but unfortunately there are always sophisticated ways to cheat the system.

Andy Parkinson, chief executive of UK Anti-Doping, says testing is getting more sophisticated in Britain but it remains a major challenge to make sure sport is drug-free. Parkinson added the more sophisticated tests become, the more chance you will have of catching a cheat and said it is a big task to try and stay one step ahead, and also frustrating – but even more frustrating for the clean athletes. Parkinson also remarked elite athletes are under a great deal of pressure and their entourage is under a great deal of pressure and, as in any walk of life, there will always be someone who crosses the line. He also said our approach to serious dopers is that we are very firm and try and get the biggest sanction we can.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Abnormal Test Findings On High In 2013

Friday 19, Jul 2013

  News Conference Walkout After Doping Questions

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

News Conference Walkout After Doping Questions

On Thursday, Carmelita Jeter of the United States and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica walked out of a news conference after they were asked about the environment in their teams after the recent failed doping tests for Tyson Gay and Asafa Powell. The sprinters had requested not to be quizzed about doping but abruptly get up and left after they were asked about doping.

Powell, the former 100-meter record holder, and Gay, who won the 100 and 200 meters in the U.S. trials last month, were notified of a positive doping test by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) earlier this month. Tyson Gay may face a ban of two years if his ‘B’ sample also proves positive.

Powell and Sherone Simpson, a three-time Olympic medalist, tested positive for the stimulant Oxilofrine at the Jamaican championships last month. In May, Olympic champion Veronica Campbell-Brown tested positive for a banned diuretic.

However, Australian hurdler Sally Pearson, American high jumper Brigetta Barrett, and sprinter Justin Gatlin didn’t follow Carmelita Jeter of the United States and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and didn’t shy away from discussing the issue of doping.

Gatlin, a former Olympic and world champion who was suspended for four years after testing positive for a banned substance in 2006, remarked you have to make sure that you’re responsible for what’s going into your body and who’s around you. He added that is one thing that he has learnt when everything happened with him and said you got to move forward.

Barrett, who won the U.S. trials with a personal best of 2.04, said he had not expected the doping test announcements and said you are always shocked by the news when your ‘heroes’ have fallen and it does feel like a shock because he didn’t expect those people to have a positive test. Barrett added that his heart and prayers go out to Gay and anybody else having to deal with the consequences of a positive test result and went on to remark that he can only pray that they could deal with it with grace and that other people can treat them accordingly.

Pearson highlighted the work of anti-doping authorities around the world while saying doping has returned to plague the image of the sport. He said it is disappointing that these things happen but at the same time, she guesses it’s good that whatever doping agency is doing it is keeping on top of the athletes. Pearson added it is a shame that you have to talk about it and it’s a shame that you have to comment on it and have a feeling and an opinion about what’s happened, because it’s hard as we know these athletes personally as well and it can be difficult.

In another development, Olympic discus thrower Traves Smikle became the fourth Jamaican athlete in four days to have a positive doping test. Smikle said he did not knowingly ingest a banned substance and said in a statement that he as an athlete takes responsibility for whatever is found in his body but he would like to say that he did not knowingly or willfully ingest any banned substance.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: News Conference Walkout After Doping Questions

Monday 17, Sep 2012

  Michael Rodgers Accepts Nine-Month Ban

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Michael Rodgers Accepts Nine-Month Ban

US Sprinter Michael Rodgers has accepted a ban of nine months after he failed to clear a drug test. An athlete in the sport of Track & Field, Rodgers of Hutto, Texas tested positive for methylhexaneamine (dimethylpentylamine).

The 26-year-old sprinter tested positive during an in-competition urine sample collected at the Sport e Solidarieta event on July 19, 2011, in Lignano, Italy. Stimulants like methylhexaneamine are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic Movement Testing and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) Anti-Doping Rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List.

The 2009 national champion in the 100 meters, Michael Rodgers, was eligible for the Olympic trials and a spot on the U.S. team in London. The American sprinter accepted a nine-month period of ineligibility, beginning on July 19, 2011 the day his urine sample was collected. As a result of this sanction, the sprinter is disqualified from any and all results obtained on and subsequent to July 19, 2011, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes. The sprinter originally made a request for a hearing in front of independent American Arbitration Association (AAA) panel at which Rodgers offered an inaccurate and misleading testimony but soon recognized his responsibility and agreed to accept his sanction and to pay the full cost of the arbitration hearing before the false testimony was acted upon by the arbitration panel by acknowledging the truth to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

The sprinter offered dependent corroborating evidence that his positive drug test resulted from the use of the supplement called Jack3d several days prior to a competition. An advisory was issued by the U.S. Anti-doping Agency on June 16, 2011 to make athletes aware of the concerns regarding methylhexaneamine (dimethylpentylamine). Athletes subject to the WADA Prohibited List are advised to avoid supplements that reference methylhexaneamine, dimethylpentylamine, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine HCl, dimethylamylamine, geranium, geranamine, or geranium stems or which purport to come from geranium oil or any constituents of a geranium plant. Products sold as dietary supplements with Methylhexaneamine include Jack3d (USP Labs), Lipo-6-Black and Hemo-Rage Black (Nutrex), Spriodex (Gaspari Nutrition), F-10 (Advanced Genetics), Clear Shot (E-Pharm), 1.M.R. (BPI Sports), and many others.

It was previously believed that the US world indoor 60m silver medalist Rodgers mistakenly consumed the stimulant while out socialising. The sprinter first claimed that he took an energy drink when in a club with some friends but later changed his story and admitted to taking a supplement called Jack3d.

Michael Rodgers finished third behind Walter Dix and Justin Gatlin at the US championships in June 2011. He earned his first Olympic berth with a strong performance at the U.S. Trials and was out-leaned in the men’s 100m final at the finish line, 9.93 to 9.94, by Ryan Bailey for third place and the final spot available on the Olympic team. He was however out of the London 2012 Olympic Games with a broken foot in what was termed by him as a 4th degree fracture. The sprinter finished fourth in the men’s 100m race at last month’s US Track and Field trials, running a personal-best 9.94 seconds.


pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Michael Rodgers Accepts Nine-Month Ban

Next »