Tyson Gay’s Doping Linked To Anti-Aging Cream

Tyson Gay, American track and field sprinter who last July delivered a positive test, is believed to have made use of a cream containing banned substances that the sprinter obtained from an Atlanta chiropractor and anti-aging specialist, according to a report by Sports Illustrated and ProPublica.

It is believed that Tyson Gay consulted a doctor in Atlanta who treats other runners and NFL players. The doctor, Clayton Gibson III, has a client list including names such as Cincinnati Bengals defensive end Michael Johnson, the late boxing champion Vernon Forrest, New York Jets safety Ed Reed, and Cleveland Browns running back Willis McGahee. Forrest thanked Gibson in 2008 on television for assisting with his nutrition program after the boxer reclaimed the WBC light middleweight title. The doctor is identified in a testimonial for a 2010 book on acupuncture as a personal physician to numerous elite, Olympic and Professional Athletes (NFL, NBA, MLB, USATF, and NCAA).

According to writer David Epstein, other athletes and coaches told him that Tyson Gay was assured by Gibson that the supplement cream was “all natural” and it had been used by NFL players who passed drug tests but Gay failed the test. Epstein remarked that the sprinter should have known better as the label on the cream is believed to have used starkly says ‘Testosterone/DHEA Crème,’ and lists Testosterone and DHEA among its ingredients. Both DHEA and testosterone are banned for Olympic athletes and two other listed ingredients, IGF-1 and somatropin (human growth hormone) are also forbidden.

Epstein was told by Director General of the World Anti-Doping Agency David Howman that it is “staggering” for a modern-day athlete not to realize they were using banned substances. Howman added that’s where it falls into the level of negligence and remarked WADA expected athletes to be hyper-cautious about supplements given the history of high-profile positive drug tests linked to them but even world-class athletes are relying more on people around them to be responsible and then, when they get let down, blaming those other people. Howman added that athletes should understand by now that hunting for an edge in a cream or potion will often end badly.

The writer reminded sport fans about current Olympian Lauryn Williams who caused a stir when she wrote on her blog post that she was urged to consult a man a fellow elite athlete had called the “sports doctor of all sports doctors.” Epstein remarked though Williams did not identify Gibson but people familiar with the matter confirmed that Williams met with Gibson and the blog post was about the meeting.

Trinidadian Kelly-Ann Baptiste, who was in the training group of Gay, also failed a drug test in 2013 and it is believed that she also consulted with Gibson and used the cream. The bronze medalist in the 100 meters at the 2011 world championships confirmed consultations with Gibson but declined to comment any further until her disciplinary process is concluded.

A former All-Pro NFL lineman who claims he was approached by Gibson said the culture in today’s times is that if you don’t have all this extra stuff, you’re not winning.

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