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Sunday 21, Apr 2013

  New Test To Catch Cheating Athletes

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New Test To Catch Cheating Athletes

A new test to catch drug cheats in sport has been developed by scientists from three UK universities.

The GH-2004 team, which is based the University of Southampton, has been developing a test over the last decade for misuse of growth hormone in sport with funding from the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and US Anti-Doping Agency and with support from UK Anti-Doping.

The test, used for the first time by King’s College London analysts at the anti-doping laboratory for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, is developed by scientists at the University of Southampton, King’s College London and University of Kent at Canterbury and based on the measurement of two proteins in the blood, insulin-like growth factor-I and the amino terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen. Both of the proteins, which act as markers of growth hormone use, lead to an increase in response to growth hormone.

On 8 September 2012, the International Paralympic Committee made an announcement that two power-lifters had received two-year suspensions for Anti-Doping Rule Violations involving growth hormone following an adverse laboratory finding using the new markers test.

Richard Holt, Professor in Diabetes and Endocrinology at the University of Southampton and also a consultant in Diabetes at Southampton General Hospital, said we are pleased to have another effective and reliable means to catch cheats and help deter harmful drug misuse. He added there has been a tremendous amount of team work to develop this test and he is delighted that this dedication has finally succeeded. I would like to thank the World Anti-Doping Agency, US Anti-Doping and UK Anti-Doping for their support and trust in our work.

Professor David Cowan, Head of the Drug Control Centre at King’s College London and Director of the anti-doping laboratory for the Games, said these findings prove that the years of research have been worthwhile. Cowan added this has been one of the most complex scientific projects the Drug Control Centre at King’s has been involved in partnership with the University of Southampton and Kent University and to be able to carry out this test at this year’s Games is a huge achievement. He also remarked that it represents a big step forward in staying at the forefront of anti-doping science, to help deter drug misuse in sport.

Andy Parkinson, UK Anti-Doping Chief Executive, adds continual improvement in testing science is fundamental to the global anti-doping movement ensuring that sophisticated dopers are caught and those at a tipping point are deterred. Parkinson said he is delighted that this UK developed test, which his team has been closely involved with, was used at the 2012 Paralympic Games to such good effect.

WADA President John Fahey praised the test by saying the new test – which has been approved by WADA – was first introduced prior to the London 2012 Olympic Games, and we are confident that it will prove a significant tool in the fight against doping in sport. Fahey also remarked that it will complement the test that has been in use since the 2004 Athens Olympic Games, the major difference being that the anti-doping community now has a much longer detection window to work with.

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Saturday 06, Apr 2013

  New Growth Hormone Test And Positive Findings From UK Research

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New Growth Hormone Test And Positive Findings From UK Research

Following ten years of research by the GH-2004 team, based at the University of Southampton, a new test for growth hormone has been developed and implemented.

With funding from the World Anti-Doping Agency and US Anti-Doping Agency, and supported by UK Anti-Doping, this test was used for the first time by King’s College London analysts at the anti-doping laboratory for  the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, leading to two Paralympic findings. It is based on the measurement of two proteins in the blood, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and the amino terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen (P-III-NP). Both the proteins that act as markers of the use of growth hormone lead to an increase in response to GH.

The work of the GH-2004 project built on previous research from the GH-2000 team which was a consortium of leading growth hormone experts from London, Gothenberg, Aarhus, and Naples, in partnership with the two European growth hormone manufacturers (Novo Nordisk and Pharmacia) and statisticians from the University of Kent and was mainly funded by the European Union under their Biomed 2 Program (BMH4 CT950678) and the International Olympic Committee.

Growth hormone, also known as somatotropin or somatropin, is a peptide hormone that stimulates growth, cell reproduction, and regeneration in humans and other animals. GH is used as a prescription drug in medicine to treat children’s growth disorders and adult growth hormone deficiency.

The International Paralympic Committee, on September 8, 2012, made an announcement that two Powerlifters had received two year suspensions for Anti-Doping Rule Violations involving growth hormone following an adverse laboratory finding using the new markers test.

Richard Holt, Professor in Diabetes and Endocrinology at the University of Southampton said we are pleased to have another and more effective and reliable means to catch cheats and help deter harmful drug misuse. Holt added that there has been a tremendous amount of team work to develop this test and he is delighted that this dedication has finally succeeded and thanked the World Anti-Doping Agency, US Anti-Doping, and UK Anti-Doping for their support and trust in the work.

Head of the Drug Control Centre at King’s College London and Director of the anti-doping laboratory for the Games, Professor David Cowan, said these findings prove that the years of research have been worthwhile. He added this has been one of the most complex scientific projects, in partnership with Southampton University and Kent University, the Drug Control Centre at King’s has been involved in and added that to be able to carry out this test at this year’s Games is a huge achievement as it represents a big step forward in staying at the forefront of anti-doping science, to help deter drug misuse in sport.

UK Anti-Doping Chief Executive, Andy Parkinson, remarked continual improvement in testing science is fundamental to the global anti-doping movement, ensuring that sophisticated dopers are caught and those at a tipping point are deterred and expressed his delight that this UK developed test, which his team has been closely involved with, was used at the 2012 Paralympic Games to such good effect.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: New Growth Hormone Test And Positive Findings From UK Research

Monday 17, Sep 2012

  Michael Rodgers Accepts Nine-Month Ban

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Michael Rodgers Accepts Nine-Month Ban

US Sprinter Michael Rodgers has accepted a ban of nine months after he failed to clear a drug test. An athlete in the sport of Track & Field, Rodgers of Hutto, Texas tested positive for methylhexaneamine (dimethylpentylamine).

The 26-year-old sprinter tested positive during an in-competition urine sample collected at the Sport e Solidarieta event on July 19, 2011, in Lignano, Italy. Stimulants like methylhexaneamine are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic Movement Testing and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) Anti-Doping Rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List.

The 2009 national champion in the 100 meters, Michael Rodgers, was eligible for the Olympic trials and a spot on the U.S. team in London. The American sprinter accepted a nine-month period of ineligibility, beginning on July 19, 2011 the day his urine sample was collected. As a result of this sanction, the sprinter is disqualified from any and all results obtained on and subsequent to July 19, 2011, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes. The sprinter originally made a request for a hearing in front of independent American Arbitration Association (AAA) panel at which Rodgers offered an inaccurate and misleading testimony but soon recognized his responsibility and agreed to accept his sanction and to pay the full cost of the arbitration hearing before the false testimony was acted upon by the arbitration panel by acknowledging the truth to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

The sprinter offered dependent corroborating evidence that his positive drug test resulted from the use of the supplement called Jack3d several days prior to a competition. An advisory was issued by the U.S. Anti-doping Agency on June 16, 2011 to make athletes aware of the concerns regarding methylhexaneamine (dimethylpentylamine). Athletes subject to the WADA Prohibited List are advised to avoid supplements that reference methylhexaneamine, dimethylpentylamine, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine HCl, dimethylamylamine, geranium, geranamine, or geranium stems or which purport to come from geranium oil or any constituents of a geranium plant. Products sold as dietary supplements with Methylhexaneamine include Jack3d (USP Labs), Lipo-6-Black and Hemo-Rage Black (Nutrex), Spriodex (Gaspari Nutrition), F-10 (Advanced Genetics), Clear Shot (E-Pharm), 1.M.R. (BPI Sports), and many others.

It was previously believed that the US world indoor 60m silver medalist Rodgers mistakenly consumed the stimulant while out socialising. The sprinter first claimed that he took an energy drink when in a club with some friends but later changed his story and admitted to taking a supplement called Jack3d.

Michael Rodgers finished third behind Walter Dix and Justin Gatlin at the US championships in June 2011. He earned his first Olympic berth with a strong performance at the U.S. Trials and was out-leaned in the men’s 100m final at the finish line, 9.93 to 9.94, by Ryan Bailey for third place and the final spot available on the Olympic team. He was however out of the London 2012 Olympic Games with a broken foot in what was termed by him as a 4th degree fracture. The sprinter finished fourth in the men’s 100m race at last month’s US Track and Field trials, running a personal-best 9.94 seconds.


pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Michael Rodgers Accepts Nine-Month Ban