bondsbonds-steroidsWith the recent conviction of Trevor Graham, all eyes are now turned to slugger Barry Bonds. Bonds was indicted November 15 last year on four counts of perjury and one count of obstruction of justice. His trial is expected to take place not until next year.

Bonds was accused of lying when he said he was unaware that he was using steroids provided to him by his trainer Greg Anderson. He was also accused of committing perjury when he denied that his trainer never injected him with steroids. Anderson, meanwhile, has served prison term for refusing to testify against Bonds.

In the book Game of Shadows, authors Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams have chronicled Bonds’ use of steroids and other banned substances. The controversial book described how and why Bonds turned to steroids after the 1998 season to enhance his performance in the Major League. The book alleged he was jealous of Mark McGwire’s popularity because of the latter’s impressive record. At that time, McGwire was the proud holder of the single-season home run record.

In 2001, he beat McGwire’s 70 home runs – Bonds hit 73. The book reported that at that time Bonds was already into two designer steroids called as “The Cream” and “The Clear”. The book further alleged that aside from the two designer steroids, Bonds was also using insulin, human growth hormone, testosterone decanoate (a fast-acting steroid known as Mexican beans) and trenbolone, a steroid developed to improve the muscle quality of livestock.

In September 2003, federal investigators raided the Bay Area Laboratories Co-Operative (BALCO), in Burlingame, California. BALCO was tipped on by Trevor Graham as the source of steroids of many American and European athletes. In said raid, financial and medical records were seized. Two days after, authorities searched Anderson’s home and found documents that suggested Bonds was using steroids and other banned drugs.