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Monday 26, Jul 2010

  Steroid nasal sprays useful for treating sinusitis

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Steroid nasal sprays useful for treating sinusitisSteroid sprays such as Rhinocort, Flonase, and Nasonex are commonly used to treat patients affected with sinusitis but the use of these sprays is yet to be accepted on a universal basis.

It is important to note here that sinusitis is an inflammation of the mucous membranes that tends to affect nearly 37 million people in the United States alone.

The review appeared in an issue of The Cochrane Library, which is a publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, an international organization that evaluates research in all aspects of health care.

Wednesday 19, May 2010

  Review finds sinusitis symptoms can be treated with steroid nasal sprays

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Review finds sinusitis symptoms can be treated with steroid nasal spraysSinusitis is an inflammation of the mucous membranes that tends to affect nearly 37 million people in the United States alone. Steroid sprays such as Rhinocort, Flonase, and Nasonex are often recommended by medical practitioners for treating this condition. But the use of steroid-based sprays is still not universally accepted.

The review appeared in an issue of The Cochrane Library, which is a publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, an international organization that evaluates research in all aspects of health care.

Two of the concerned studies examined patients at treatment centers in the United States; one took place in Turkey and the other included 71 medical centers in 14 countries.

Monday 10, May 2010

  Sleep apnea affected children find relief with tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy

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Sleep apnea affected children find relief with tonsillectomy and adenoidectomyTonsillectomy and adenoidectomy could provide dramatic relief to children who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). It was disclosed in a Saint Louis University study that the benefits prove useful for solving sleep problems for 80 to 90 percent of children.

The study is the largest to date in examining how children with different OSA severities perform before and after surgery, by making the use of preoperative and postoperative sleep studies.

Ron Mitchell, M.D., professor of pediatric otolaryngology at Saint Louis University and the study’s author, remarked that obstructive sleep apnea has a significant effect on life quality of children, very much like chronic asthma or rheumatoid arthritis.

Sunday 10, Jan 2010

  Life quality of children with sleep apnea improves with tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy

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Life quality of children with sleep apnea improves with tonsillectomy and adenoidectomyAccording to a Saint Louis University study, tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy may provide great relief in terms of solving sleep problems for 80-90 percent of children suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Children who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) stop breathing at periodic intervals throughout the night and make loud snores. It is worth noting that this issue affects boys and girls equally.

Ron Mitchell, M.D., professor of pediatric otolaryngology at Saint Louis University and the study’s author, remarked that surgery has the potential to bring a profound positive effect on children’s lives.

Thursday 07, Jan 2010

  New treatment for chronic sinusitis identified

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chronic-sinusitisA new treatment for chronic sinusitis has been identified by Summit Ear, Nose & Throat in an outpatient setting called FinESS™ Sinus Treatment.

FinESS can be classified as a new balloon sinuplasty technique, which is less invasive than the traditional sinus surgery. The technique breaks the cycle of chronic sinusitis with immediate relief to provide lasting results.

In this technique, a small balloon is inserted into the patient’s sinus passages. The balloon is inflated, deflated, and then removed.

This treatment option is considered by many members of the medical fraternity as a potential breakthrough for treating chronic sinusitis (CRS).

Sunday 20, Sep 2009

  Steroid Nasal spray and antibiotic therapy effective for acute sinusitis

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Steroid Nasal spray and antibiotic therapy effective for acute sinusitisAccording to a recently published review, more than 37 million Americans suffer from nasal congestion, sinus pressure, cough and postnasal drip that accompany sinusitis.

Though doctors prescribe antibiotics for relieving acute sinusitis but that may develop following a chest cold, a combination of steroid nasal spray and antibiotic therapy is the best option when it comes to easing symptoms and speedy recovery, as per researchers from Israel.

Sinusitis is an inflammation of the mucous membranes that is lined between the sinus cavities. Doctors usually prescribe steroid sprays like Nasonex, Flonase, and Rhinocort for treating chronic sinusitis and allergies symptoms.

It was remarked that 73 percent of patients treated with nasal steroids gained relief or significant improvement of symptoms compared with only 66.4 percent of patients receiving placebo during the study period.

Tuesday 25, Aug 2009

  Acute sinusitis can be prevented with steroids

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Acute sinusitis can be prevented with steroidsAccording to a new review by researchers from Israel, steroid nasal sprays – either alone or with antibiotic therapy – can prove to be effective in preventing and curing acute sinusitis, which can develop following a chest cold.

The review was published in an issue of The Cochrane Library, a renowned publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, which is an international organization evaluating all aspects of health care.

It is believed that approximately 37 million Americans suffer from acute sinusitis. The findings of this review will help them and patients worldwide to get relief.

From News-Medical.Net:

Study participants, who underwent X-rays or nasal endoscopy to confirm diagnosis, received either a placebo or intranasal corticosteroids for two or three weeks, alone or in combination with antibiotics. Intranasal corticosteroids used included fluticasone propionate (Flonase), mometasone furoate (Nasonex) and budesonide (Rhinocort).

Overall, 73 percent of the patients treated with nasal steroids experienced relief or marked improvement of symptoms during the study period, compared with only 66.4 percent of patients who received the placebo.

“For every 100 patients treated with intranasal corticosteroids, seven additional patients had complete or marked symptom relief,” compared to those in the placebo group, the reviewers found.

Researchers pooled data from three of the four studies, excluding the lowest-quality study from the statistical analysis.

None of the studies reported serious side effects, and rates of sinusitis relapse were similar between the treatment and placebo groups.

Stronger doses of nasal steroids appeared to work better. Patients receiving daily doses of 400 micrograms were more likely to experience relief of sinusitis symptoms, than were patients receiving 200-microgram doses.

Allen Seiden, M.D., director of the University of Cincinnati Taste and Smell Center, remarked that more data is required before recommendations for intranasal corticosteroids can be made.

The involved reviewers were of the view that the findings of this review support the clinical rationale behind addition of an intranasal corticosteroid to antibiotic therapy.

Tuesday 25, Aug 2009

  Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy surgery effective in improving quality of life

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Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy surgery effective in improving quality of lifeAccording to a study conducted at the Saint Louis University, tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy can prove to be effective in offering dramatic relief for treating sleep problems for 80-90 percent children who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

This study was aimed at potential factors such as ethnicity and age that could affect OSA diagnosis and surgery impact besides being the largest to date study looking at how children with different OSA severities fare before and after surgery with the use of both preoperative and postoperative sleep studies.

From News-Medical.Net:

Children who suffer from OSA stop breathing periodically throughout the night and snore very loudly. In normal weight children, the condition is caused by enlargement of the tonsils and adenoids that aggravate upper airway collapse during sleep, which disrupts normal breathing.

“Obstructive sleep apnea has a considerable impact on children’s quality of life, similar to chronic asthma or rheumatoid arthritis” says Ron Mitchell, M.D., professor of pediatric otolaryngology at Saint Louis University and the study’s author. “Our study has shown that surgery can have a profound positive effect on children’s lives.”

OSA affects boys and girls equally. Approximately 2 to 4 percent of children ages 4 to 6 years old have OSA, although Mitchell suspects the number is probably actually higher because parents don’t recognize or tell doctors about the problem.

All 79 children in the study showed significant improvement after the surgery, although some children had persistent OSA. The study found that the success of the surgery was directly related the preoperative severity of OSA.

The study defined resolution of OSA as experiencing less than five incidents of interrupted breathing throughout the course of a night. OSA was resolved in all children with mild preoperative OSA (five to nine incidents per night). For children with moderate preoperative OSA (10-19 incidents per night), 88 percent experienced resolution, while 64 percent of children with severe preoperative OSA (20 incidents or more) experienced resolution.

“The results of the surgery were dramatic, even for children who had persistent OSA,” Mitchell says. “To go from having 40 or more incidents of interrupted breathing in a night to having only five or six – that is a pretty remarkable improvement in their sleep that leads to a dramatic improvement in quality of life.”

In today’s times, the available options for OSA treatment include nasal steroids, additional surgery, allergy treatment, and CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) mask.

Monday 25, May 2009

  Staying active reduces health risks for retired athletes and footballers!

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Staying active reduces health risks for retired athletes and footballers!Medical Sciences have once again brought some good news for the athletes. A detailed study carried out on some retired players of the National Football League (NFL) have revealed that the players who comparatively had a more active life style are less likely to fall prey to diabetes, hypertension, sedentary lifestyles and metabolic syndrome.

Experiments were carried out by treating patients with intranasal corticosteroids and it was found out that out of every 100 administered patients, 7 patients were found to have marked symptom relief. This formed 73 percent of people as compared to 66.4 percent who received the placebo. It was also found out those stronger doses of steroids actually helped in the same.

However, the research clearly showed that the study was based on retired players from an entirely different era. Football players of today’s times are about 50 percent larger in their built than a quarter of a century ago. Levine, the Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at UT Southwestern asserted that, Today, there is a lot of incentive for football players and athletes to get as big as possible through eating, extensive training or by using anabolic steroids and other artificial growth hormones. The new criterion for success in present times is the bigger the better. But one should always keep into account the negative repercussions of consuming excessive anabolic steroids. However, when taken in prescribed quantities, they are not harmful.