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Monday 29, Mar 2010

  Steroid-induced osteoporosis gets better treated with Teriparatide

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Steroid-induced osteoporosis gets better treated with TeriparatideGlucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (OP) is better treated with a synthetic form of the human parathyroid hormone, Teriparatide. This finding was disclosed by a recent study. The study findings were published in the November 2009 issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

It was disclosed by the researchers that patients with OP and treated with Teriparatide for a period of 36 months experienced greater increase in bone mineral density (BMD) and fewer new vertebral fractures than those treated with alendronate.

The measures of this research included changes in lumbar spine and hip bone, BMD, changes in bone biomarkers, fracture incidence, and safety. The 36-month, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial, led by Kenneth Saag, M.D., from the University of Alabama, was conducted at 76 centers located in 13 countries.

Sunday 28, Feb 2010

  Hormone holds potential of keeping joint injuries from causing long-term Osteoarthritis

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Hormone holds potential of keeping joint injuries from causing long-term OsteoarthritisAn existing drug for osteoporosis, Teriparitide, has been found as the first drug to prevent loss of cartilage from osteoarthritis after an incident of joint injury. This drug is also capable of regenerating a portion of cartilage lost because of osteoarthritis.

These findings were reported at the annual meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research in Denver.

This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health and conducted by Randy Rosier, M.D., Ph.D., professor within the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Rochester Medical Center in collaboration with Erik Sampson, Todd O’Brien, Di Chen, Susan Bukata, J. Edward Puzas, Regis O’Keefe and Michael Zuscik within the Department of Orthopaedics and by Hani Awad in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Thursday 25, Feb 2010

  Trial of latest osteoporosis drug about to start

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Trial of latest osteoporosis drug about to startA human trial of a new osteoporosis drug is about to be initiated by Endocrinologists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC. The trial is expected to offer significant relief to osteoporosis patients suffering from weakened bones.

Principal investigator Mara J. Horwitz, M.D., an assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Pitt School of Medicine, and a practicing metabolic bone specialist at UPMC, said that 105 participants will be randomly assigned to receive either teriparitide, FDA-approved drug, or an experimental agent known as parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP).

This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the University of Pittsburgh Clinical Translational Sciences Award.

Thursday 18, Feb 2010

  PTH therapy highly effective for treating Osteoarthritis

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PTH therapy highly effective for treating OsteoarthritisAn osteoporosis drug may prove its addition worth by preventing cartilage loss arising due to osteoarthritis after a joint injury, as per an early study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research in Denver.

Even though presently available drugs such as steroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. Advil, Aleve) are effective for minimizing the level of associated pain yet they are ineffective for completely addressing loss of cartilage due to osteoarthritis that is believed to afflict more than 50 million Americans by 2020.

Physicians are often left clueless when it comes to restoration of cartilage in patients suffering from osteoarthritis, as per Randy Rosier, M.D., Ph.D., professor within the Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Saturday 06, Feb 2010

  Hormone holds promise for preventing joint injuries from resulting in osteoarthritis

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Hormone holds promise for preventing joint injuries from resulting in osteoarthritisAn existing drug for osteoporosis has been hailed as the first ever found for preventing loss of cartilage from osteoarthritis post joint injury besides being useful in regenerating some part of cartilage lost due to osteoarthritis.

This finding was presented on September 12, 2009 at the annual meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research in Denver.

Randy Rosier, M.D., Ph.D., professor within the Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said physicians are presently left with no way to restore cartilage in patients who have lost it to osteoarthritis but the study results suggest that cartilage degeneration can be inhibited and the volume of cartilage in diseased joints be improved, at least in mice.

Wednesday 27, Jan 2010

  Teriparatide better than Alendronate for treating steroid-induced Osteoporosis

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osteoporosisGlucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (OP) is now treatable with Teriparatide, which is a synthetic form of the human parathyroid hormone, according to a recent study.

It was found by the researchers that patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and treated with teriparatide for a period of 36 months had a significant increase in BMD (bone mineral density) and fewer new vertebral fractures than those treated with alendronate.

The findings of this study were published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

Tuesday 12, Jan 2010

  Osteoporosis risk higher in HIV-patients

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Osteoporosis risk higher in HIV-patientsThe quality of life for HIV-patients may have improved due to introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) but that has increased the risk of long-term negative disorders, namely osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is a multifactorial ailment that is characterized by a consistent minimization in body bone mass and its mechanical resistance. Increased propensity to bone fractures is a common symptom with individuals suffering from this medical complication.

The authors noted that a bone densitometry scan is required to be performed each and every time there is a data pertaining to hypogonadism, treated with steroids for chronic ailment or a past history of osteoporosis induced fractures with an aim to improve patient’s progress.

Tuesday 29, Dec 2009

  Teriparatide can help in treating steroid-induced osteoporosis

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Possible link between diabetes, atherosclerosis, and psoriasisAccording to findings of a recent study that was published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (OP) is easily treatable with Teriparatide, a synthetic form of the human parathyroid hormone.

Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones, which are produced naturally in the body and can be termed as synthetically created compounds meant for the purpose of reducing inflammation. These steroid drugs are used for controlling inflammation in patients suffering with ailments such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, asthma, and Crohn’s disease.

Kenneth Saag, M.D., from the University of Alabama, led this 36-month, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial, and recommended that teriparatide is an effective treatment option for patients with steroid-induced OA.

Thursday 17, Dec 2009

  Steroid-induced osteoporosis is treatable with Teriparatide

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Steroid-induced osteoporosis is treatable with TeriparatideGlucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (OP) is now very much treatable with Teriparatide, a synthetic form of the human parathyroid hormone, as per a recent study.

The involved researchers found that patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and administered with teriparatide for a period of 36 months had a greater increase in bone mineral density apart from fewer new vertebral fractures than those treated with alendronate.

The study findings were published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). The 36-month randomized, double-blind, and controlled trial was conducted at 76 centers located in 13 countries and led by Kenneth Saag, M.D., from the University of Alabama.

Dr. Saag commented that there are a considerable number of individuals treated regularly with steroids for controlling inflammation that puts them at risk for developing osteoporosis and teriparatide is a safe and effective treatment for patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis.

Friday 04, Dec 2009

  Osteoarthritis can be effectively treated with PTH therapy

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Osteoarthritis can be effectively treated with PTH therapyAn existing osteoporosis drug can prove to be an effective treatment option for preventing cartilage loss from osteoarthritis after a joint injury, as per an early study presented today at the annual meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research in Denver.

It is important to note that the presently available drugs such as steroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. Advil, Aleve) can be good enough to minimize pain but are not capable of addressing cartilage loss behind osteoarthritis that is believed to afflict more than 50 million Americans by 2020.

According to Randy Rosier, M.D., Ph.D., professor within the Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Rochester Medical Center, physicians are left with no answer when it comes to bringing back cartilage in patients who have lost the battle to osteoarthritis.

The results of this study, suggesting a slight restoration of cartilage, can prove helpful for physicians treating patients with osteoarthritis.

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