As promised, we’ll keep you posted on the ongoing Paralympic Games in Beijing. So far, we’ve only reported two Paralympic athletes who were kicked out of the Games because they tested positive for steroids.

Now, we’re going to add two more to that statistics as two powerlifters have been banned for failing doping tests. The two Paralympians who both received two-year ban are Facourou Sissoko of Mali and Liudmyla Osmanova of Ukraine. The two gave positive tests for anabolic steroids in out-of-competition tests, according to the International Paralympic Committee on Thursday.

Sissoko’s urine sample on September 6 tested positive for boldenone metabolites. Osmanova’s sample on August 29 yielded 19-Norandrosterone, a metabolite of anabolic steroid nandrolone. The IPC stated that it had implemented 461 tests to date for the ongoing Paralympic Games and it intends to carry out around 1,000 screenings before the Games end on September 17.

Earlier doping incidents at the Paralympics involved Pakistani powerlifter Naveed Ahmed Butt and German wheelchair basketballer Ahmet Coskun.

Butt’s urine sample tested positive for methandienone. The sample was taken September 4 just tow days before the opening ceremony. Coskun, meanwhile, was banned from the games because his pre-competition urine test resulted to a positive test for a masking agent. Coskun’s sample taken on August 23 tested positive for finasteride, a legitimate drug that is used in the treatment of male pattern baldness. The drug, however, is included in the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Prohibited List since it is typically used  by anabolic steroid users to cover up drugs that enhance athletic performance.

The IPC’s official website states the following relating to their anti-doping program:
“Anti-doping programmes seek to preserve what is intrinsically valuable about sport – “The spirit of sport”. Thus, the rationale for doping control in sport is twofold: first, to protect athletes from the potential harmful side effects that some drugs can produce; and second, to ensure fair and ethical competition by preventing athletes from taking prohibited substances or using prohibited methods in an attempt to increase performance or violating the spirit of sport.”

According to IPC’s Anti-Doping Code, doping is defined as the occurrence of one or two of the following anti-doping rule violations:

•    the presence of a prohibited substance in an athlete’s bodily specimen
•    use or attempted use of a prohibited substance or a prohibited method
•    refusing or failing to submit to sample collection after notification
•    violation of the requirements regarding athlete availability for out-of-competition testing
•    tampering with any part of doping control
•    possession of prohibited substances and methods
•    trafficking in any prohibited substance or prohibited method
•    administration or attempted administration of a prohibited substance or prohibited method to any athlete, or assisting, encouraging, aiding, abetting, covering up or any other type of complicity involving an anti-doping rule violation or any attempted violation.