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Friday 05, Jun 2015

  Report Accuses Track Coach Salazar Of Promoting Doping

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Report Accuses Track Coach Salazar Of Promoting Doping

According to a report by ProPublica and the BBC, track coach Alberto Salazar has breaking doping rules since long.

Salazar, the coach of Mo Farah and Galen Rupp, was accused by Steve Magness, a former assistant at Salazar’s Nike Oregon Project, of encouraging Rupp to use testosterone medication. Salazar, a three-time New York City Marathon winner, is also coaching the American teenage sensation Mary Cain.

Magness, who is now serving as the cross country coach at the University of Houston, also alleged that Salazar has been using his son, Alex, as a guinea pig for testing supplements to find out at what levels they would set off a positive test.

Kara Goucher, a world championship bronze medalist in the 10,000 meters, also claimed that she was pressed to take thyroid medication by Salazar even she did not had a prescription for it.

The investigation from the BBC and U.S. investigative publication ProPublica revealed that Rupp was instructed by Salazar to use banned substances, including Testosterone and Prednisone, the banned asthma drug, in 2002. The whistleblowers include high-profile U.S. marathoner Kara Goucher and Steve Magness. The Panorama program also quoted three witnesses with sworn statements claiming that Allan Wells, who won 100m gold at the 1980 Olympics, had taken anabolic androgenic steroids.

Peter Eriksson, head coach of Canada’s track and field team, he knew about the allegations “a month ago,” after he met with Salazar.

Salazar denied the allegations and remarked that there were a few disgruntled former athletes and coaches with an axe to grind who were starting rumors. Eriksson said the rumors have been going around for a while and they are not substantiated.

Salazar also said the legal supplement Testoboost had been “incorrectly recorded as ‘testosterone’ medication” on the report of Galen Rupp. The coach when questioned about his son participating in tests to evade drug testers said he was determining how much of testosterone gel would it take to trigger a positive test in case rivals of his team attempted to sabotage one of his athletes. Magness remarked the defense of Salazar is ludicrous and it was them trying to figure out how to cheat the tests.

Meanwhile, the World Anti-Doping Agency has issued a statement saying that we have carefully viewed the BBC’s Panorama program which includes some allegations suggesting doping in athletics. The WADA statement added the program alleges practices relating to coach Alberto Salazar of the Nike Oregon Project in the United States. Any investigation will be a matter for the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) and the IAAF, and the relevant information shall be passed to them.

It was also remarked that WADA acknowledge that the program also raises questions regarding the ability of athletes to dope by taking minimal amounts of performance-enhancing substances without testing positive, otherwise known as ‘micro-dosing’. It went to comment that this is an issue that we are exploring in great detail with experts from across the anti-doping community, and indeed it was highlighted in the recent Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) Report.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Report Accuses Track Coach Salazar Of Promoting Doping

Tuesday 07, May 2013

  Two-Year Suspensions For Cyclist And Track & Field Athlete

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Two-Year Suspensions For Cyclist And Track & Field Athlete

Yosmani Pol Rodriguez of Weston, an athlete in the sport of cycling, has tested positive for a prohibited substance, according to an announcement by the United States Anti-Doping Agency.

The 32-year-old has accepted a two-year sanction for his doping offense after testing positive for Dexamethasone as the result of an in-competition urine sample collected on March 10, 2012 at the Delray Beach Twilight Criterium. Dexamethasone is classified as a glucocorticosteroid on the World Anti-Doping Prohibited List and is prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Cycling Union (“UCI”) anti-doping rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”) and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List. The cyclist accepted a two-year period of ineligibility, which began on September 2, 2012, the date of his last competition. Rodriguez has also been disqualified from all competitive results achieved on and subsequent to March 10, 2012, including the forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes.

A potent synthetic member of the glucocorticoid class of steroid drugs, Dexamethasone can suppress the natural pituitary-adrenal axis and acts as an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant and is medically prescribed to treat inflammatory conditions such as allergies, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, and breathing disorders. When taken orally, Dexamethasone is 26.6 times more potent than the naturally occurring hormone cortisol and 6.6 times more potent than prednisone. The CYP2D6 enzyme inducer is commonly used by sportsmen to develop fat easily and may increase the effects of many prodrugs and protoxins which are metabolized via CYP2D6 (like tramadol or codeine) by directly increasing the amount of the active metabolite produced.

In another development, Shawn Crawford of Culver City, an athlete in the sport of track & field, has received a suspension of two years for committing an anti-doping rule violation in which he failed to file his whereabouts information. The 35-year-old Crawford was a member of the USADA National Testing Pool from 2001 through the beginning of 2013, which consists of a select group of athletes subject to certain whereabouts requirements in order to be located for USADA Out-of-Competition testing.

The track and field athlete failed to comply with the whereabouts requirements and, as a result, accrued three Whereabouts Failures within an 18-month period. Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) Anti-Doping Rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”), the combination of three Whereabouts Failures within an 18-month period constitutes a rule violation. A Whereabouts Failure for National Testing Pool athletes includes failure to provide required quarterly whereabouts filings and/or failure to be available for testing due to inaccurate or incomplete information provided by the athlete. The two-year period of ineligibility for Crawford, began on April 17, 2013, the date he received the sanction. As a result of the violation, Crawford has been disqualified from all competitive results achieved on and subsequent to November 17, 2012 the date of his third Whereabouts Failure, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Two-Year Suspensions For Cyclist And Track & Field Athlete

Thursday 21, Jun 2012

  Adelaide doctor tests positive

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A doctor from Adelaide, who had ambitions of cycling for Australia, has been suspended from the sport for a period of two years after testing positive for anabolic steroids.

An in-competition test was conducted on Steve Sabine in April, 2009 at the South Australian Criterium Championships by the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority.

Sabine’s sample tested positive for testosterone that belongs to the category of anabolic steroid and is banned both in and out of competition.

Wednesday 18, Apr 2012

  South Australian cyclist banned

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South Australian cyclist Stephen Sabine has been suspended from cycling for two years after testing positive for anabolic steroids.

Sabine tested positive to prednisone and prednisolone that are banned in competition when taken orally.

The cyclist, a doctor, waived his right to a hearing and accepted the maximum two-year ban.

Tuesday 17, Apr 2012

  Doctor with cycling aspirations tested positive

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Steve Sabine, a doctor from Adelaide, who had harbored ambitions of cycling for Australia, was suspended from the sport for two years after testing positive for anabolic steroids.

An in-competition test was conducted on Sabine in April, 2009 at the South Australian Criterium Championships by the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority.

Sabine’s sample tested positive for testosterone that is categorized as an anabolic steroid and is banned both in and out of competition.

Tuesday 15, Nov 2011

  Steroids successfully treat Clopidogrel hypersensitivity

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A new study has confirmed that a single three-week course of prednisone can successfully treat Clopidogrel hypersensitivity without needing to interrupt treatment with the antiplatelet agent.

This study was conducted by a group led by Dr Asim Cheema (St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON).

The study was published in the September 27, 2011 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Tuesday 20, Sep 2011

  Steroid drugs could pose vision complications

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A University of Michigan eye doctor and the consumer Public Citizen organization recently said in a federal petition for stronger warning labels on steroid drugs such as prednisone that are taken by 25.5 million Americans for arthritis, cancer, transplants and other conditions.

It was remarked that these drugs need to come with stronger consumer warnings about rare but possibly irreversible vision impairment.

Dr. Michael Carome, deputy director of Public Citizen’s Health Research Group, said only two manufacturers of more than a dozen have listed the complication on drug labels as a potential side effect.

Wednesday 02, Mar 2011

  South Australian cyclist suspended

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South Australian cyclist suspendedStephen Sabine, a cyclist from South Australia, has been suspended from sport for two years after he tested positive for anabolic steroids.

The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) conducted an in-competition test on the cyclist in April 2009 during the South Australian Criterium Championships.

The cyclist is banned from taking part in recognized sports until June 19, 2011.

Friday 04, Feb 2011

  Budesonide could replace Prednisone for autoimmune hepatitis

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Budesonide could replace Prednisone for autoimmune hepatitisDr. Michael P. Manns and his colleagues said in an article appearing in the October issue of Gastroenterology that a combination of budesonide plus azathioprine achieves and maintains remission of autoimmune hepatitis as well as standard prednisone therapy does, while sparing patients many of the adverse effects of steroids.

Dr. Manns of Hannover (Germany) Medical School and his associates compared the safety and efficacy of the budesonide combination with the standard therapy of prednisone with azathioprine.

From Internalmedicinenews.com:

In the first phase of the study, 208 patients aged 10-70 years were randomly assigned to receive budesonide (103 subjects) or prednisone (105 subjects) with azathioprine for 6 months. Budesonide was given in 3-mg oral doses three times daily, a regimen that was decreased to twice daily if remission occurred. Prednisone was started at 40 mg/day and tapered to 10 mg/day.

Azathioprine was administered at a dose of 1-2 mg/kg per day, according to the clinician’s judgment. None of the study subjects had any evidence of cirrhosis.

A total of 176 subjects completed this phase. Reasons for withdrawal included lack of efficacy (3 patients taking budesonide and 12 taking prednisone), adverse events (3 patients taking budesonide, 3 taking prednisone), and lack of compliance with the study protocol (4 patients taking budesonide, 2 taking prednisone).

The study was described by researchers as the largest prospective, randomized, multicenter trial published to date for the treatment of autoimmune hepatitis.

Thursday 20, Jan 2011

  Adelaide doctor tests positive to steroids

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Adelaide doctor tests positive to steroidsAn Adelaide doctor, who had ambitions of cycling for Australia, has been suspended from the sport for two years after a positive test to steroids.

Steve Sabine, the doctor, was suspended after the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority conducted an in-competition test on him at the South Australian Criterium Championships.

The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority imposed a ban of two years on the doctor.

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