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Thursday 29, Jul 2010

  Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with steroids

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Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with steroidsTriamcinolone, a corticosteroid (steroid) when administered in injectable form, could be highly useful to slow down the progression of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, which is a complication of diabetes leading to vision loss or blindness.

Treatment based on steroids cannot be routinely recommended at this point of time because of safety issues despite of the fact that steroids work, according to Neil M. Bressler, the James P. Gills Professor of Ophthalmology and chief of the Retina Division of the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, chair of the government-sponsored Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network.

The finding was revealed in a study by researchers led by specialists at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute and this study was published in an issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Wednesday 20, Jan 2010

  Steroids not better than DME for laser treatments

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steroids-not-better-than-dmeInjecting a corticosteroid, triamcinolone, directly into the eye can slowdown the progression of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that frequently leads to blindness.

This finding was revealed by a team of researchers led by specialists at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute.

It was however noted by the study authors that steroid use in the eye may raise the risks of glaucoma and cataract and laser photo-coagulation remains the treatment of choice till the time a new treatment option is formulated that can reproduce the positive effects of steroids without the associated risks of such use.

Neil M. Bressler, the James P. Gills Professor of Ophthalmology and chief of the Retina Division of the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, chair of the government-sponsored Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network, remarked that though steroid treatment works, it cannot be recommended on a routinely basis due to the safety issues.

 

 

 


Monday 04, Jan 2010

  Steroid injections can inhibit Diabetes-Related Eye Disease

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Steroid injections can inhibit Diabetes-Related Eye DiseaseInjecting triamcinolone, the corticosteroid, into the eye can slow down the progression of diabetic retinopathy, as per a report in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that may result in blindness and vision loss.

This study was conducted by Neil M. Bressler, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network.

Monday 28, Dec 2009

  Steroids not better than laser treatments for DME

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Steroids not better than laser treatments for DMEResearchers led by specialists at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute have been able to found out that injecting triamcinolone, a corticosteroid, directly into the human eye can slow the progression of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that results in blindness.

It was, however, remarked that use of steroids may lead to an increased risk of glaucoma and cataract. Laser photocoagulation is the best treatment option till the time a new drug is not discovered that can offer the good effects of steroids, minus the damage.

According to Bressler, lead author of the study, there were some evidences that suggest steroids can enhance vision outcomes from diabetic macular edema (DME).

Monday 28, Dec 2009

  Steroids can possibly delay diabetes-related eye ailments

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Steroids can possibly delay diabetes-related eye ailmentsDiabetic retinopathy, which is a complication of diabetes and results in vision loss and blindness, can be effectively treated via injectable steroids. This finding was revealed in a new study that was led by researcher Dr Neil M. Bressler of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy happens when new blood vessels are formed on the optic disc or another component of the retina. Though laser treatments can considerably reduce the risk of vision loss and control of blood glucose can prevent the development of retinopathy, yet there is a need for identification of other treatments.

This study appeared in journal Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.