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Tuesday 12, Sep 2017

  Double Olympian Re-launches Fight Against Doping Charges

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Paul Edwards, the double Olympian shot putter from Britain, has launched a Facebook page as part of his longstanding efforts to get his name cleared from charges that took place long before social media existed.

Edwards, who was banned for life in 1997 after a second positive doping test, competed at the 1988 and 1992 Olympics and won bronze for Wales at the 1990 Commonwealth Games. Till date, he disputes his positive test in 1994 that resulted in a ban of four years and the findings from an out-of-competition test undertaken while he was still banned which led to his lifetime ban.

Edwards said in a video recording on his page, entitled Paul Edwards Victim of Deceit and Deception that he wrongly received a life ban from athletics after an incorrect out-of-competition test for Testosterone in 1997. The former GB international and Olympic shot putter said he is not guilty and will continue as he had done for 20 years to fight to prove his innocence. The shot putter, who competed for both England and Wales, was sent home on the eve of the Victoria 1994 Commonwealth Games along with fellow athlete Diane Modahl after doping charges emerged against them.

The double Olympian shot putter failed two tests. He first failed an anti-doping test that was conducted during the European Championships in Helsinki earlier in the year and the second failed test was two days after he returned from competing there. The first sample tested positive for a cocktail of banned substances, including anabolic steroids, raised testosterone, and the stimulant pseudoephedrine. The second sample was found to be positive for Testosterone. Edwards subsequently received a lifetime doping ban and his ban was the first incident of a British athlete receiving a lifetime ban.

In 1996, Modahl made a return to athletics after she was cleared on appeal by the international body for athletics, then known as the International Amateur Athletic Federation, and the British Athletic Federation, following evidence that her sample had materially degraded after serious failures in the chain of custody and storage.

Edwards in the past have alleged numerous faults with the findings for his 1997 sample and even went on to challenge the chain of custody. The shot putter made use of the Freedom of Information Act in 2009 to obtain information on his tests from the Drug Control Centre at King’s College, London. In November 1997, the High Court ruled in the favor of UK Athletics, UK Sport, and the Doping Control Centre at King’s College, London that the claim for damage by Edwards was “statute barred”.

Edwards said his case has still not been reconsidered and added he had received a lifetime ban which has marred his life even though guilty athletes are constantly being reinstated after agreed periods of time. Edwards added he is not guilty and will continue to fight.

Edwards represented Great Britain 43 times and won 11 AAA titles and 5 UK titles. The retired professional athlete also represented Great Britain in decathlon and held Welsh national records at shot put, decathlon, and discus and won 9 Welsh titles.

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Saturday 24, Jan 2015

  Olympic Doping Appeal Of Backstrom Resolved With Reprimand

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Olympic Doping Appeal Of Backstrom Resolved With Reprimand

Capitals center Nicklas Backstrom has withdrawn his appeal against ruling of the International Olympic Committee that he violated World Anti-Doping Agency law.

Backstrom, the Swedish professional ice hockey centre and an alternate captain for the Washington Capitals of the National Hockey League, was allowed to keep the silver medal he earned playing for Sweden in the Sochi Olympics last February. The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Backstrom had not intended to gain any competitive advantage by using the medication.

According to a joint announcement between Backstrom, WADA, and the IOC, Backstrom agreed upon a reprimand that is the minimum application sanction permitted by the WADA code. The announcement said the final decision was reached for Backstrom to remove his appeal and the World Anti-Doping Agency to issue a reprimand after constructive discussions between Backstrom’s representatives and those of the IOC, WADA, and the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF).

It was also revealed by the announcement that at no time was Backstrom’s receipt of his Olympic silver medal at issue in the proceedings before the Court of Arbitration for Sport. The announcement emphasized that Backstrom did not intend to enhance his sport performance by taking a prohibited substance, that the prohibited substance (PSE) was contained within a product Backstrom was taking for medical reasons, that Backstrom relied on the specific advice of his team doctor that his use of the product would not give rise to a positive sample, and that he openly disclosed the product on the doping control form at the time of the doping control.

Backstrom received the full support of Coach Barry Trotz, his teammates, and NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly when it emerged that the World Anti-Doping Agency had appealed the IOC’s decision to exonerate Backstrom. In early December, Daly said the NHL supports Nick in this circumstance and added that he thinks there were unfair circumstances surrounding the determination, and unfortunately it is still in litigation.

The 27-year-old Swede was judged to have committed an anti-doping rule violating on March 14, 2014 based on elevated pseudoephedrine levels. Backstrom tested positive for pseudoephedrine after Sweden’s win over Slovenia in the Olympic quarterfinals on February 19, 2014. The Washington Capitals centre claimed the stimulant was contained in a sinus medication he had been taking for allergies. Nicklas Backstrom was suspended and pulled from the Swedish team just hours before the February 23 gold-medal game, which Sweden lost 3-0 to Canada. The timing of the decision angered the Swedes who said it affected the team’s performance.

Pseudoephedrine is an ingredient found in his allergy medication not banned by the National Hockey League (NHL). This resulted in Backstrom getting barred from playing in the gold medal game. Later, Backstrom was awarded his silver medal in a ceremony in Sweden on August 28.

On April 2, 2014, Backstrom filed his appeal and challenged that an anti-doping rule violation had occurred. The World Anti-Doping Agency filed its appeal on October 9, 2014 and tried to counter ruling of the IIHF Disciplinary Committee that Backstrom had not violated the WADA code.

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Sunday 02, Mar 2014

  Backstrom Misses Gold Medal Olympic Hockey Game

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Backstrom Misses Gold Medal Olympic Hockey Game

Washington Capitals center Nicklas Backstrom was pulled from the lineup of Sweden lineup hours before the Olympic gold medal hockey game against Canada. This was after Backstrom tested positive for a banned substance found in his allergy medication.

The test result of Nicklas Backstrom showed an elevated level of pseudoephedrine that is prohibited by the International Olympic Committee but not the NHL. However, the violation of the IOC’s anti-doping policy is not expected to prevent the Washington Capitals center from playing with the Capitals when their season resumes. The timing of Backstrom and the fact that he was taking the medication with the approval of the Swedish national team doctor raises questions about the testing process of the International Olympic Committee. Mark Aubry, chief medical officer for the International Ice Hockey Federation, said there certainly is no doping in this instance and added Backstrom is an innocent victim, and we support him strongly. Aubry added doping is certainly not allowed, but this is not a case of doping.

At a news conference, Backstrom said he had absolutely nothing to hide and disclosed that he had allergy problems. Backstrom remarked he had been there for two weeks and it was probably the most fun two weeks he have ever had. Backstrom added he was ready to play probably the biggest game of my career, and two and a half hours before the game he got pulled aside.

Backstrom had taken Zyrtec-D, a permitted drug although it contains pseudoephedrine, for seven years for treating sinusitis. The drug is allowed by the International Olympic Committee as long as levels do not exceed 150 micrograms per milliliter and is not tested outside of competition. According to Aurby, Backstrom’s level was 190.

Backstrom was tested after Sweden’s quarterfinal win over Slovenia, but neither he nor team officials were informed of the positive result until hours before the gold medal game that was after four days. The IOC defended itself by saying it had too many tests to process to deliver the result sooner. Mathieu Schneider, NHL Players Association official, remarked he didn’t see IOC statement as an acceptable explanation and cited a similar situation during the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, when defenseman Lubomir Visnovsky of Slovakia tested positive for elevated pseudoephedrine levels but was allowed to be retested after two years and was ultimately allowed to play. Schneider remarked this process was flawed and added he thinks it is clear that he wasn’t intending to cheat, that he wasn’t doping and went on to add that doping is a very serious allegation, and at some point common sense should have prevailed, and it clearly did not. The ineligibility of Backstrom left Sweden, already without stars Henrik Zetterberg (because of herniated disk) and Henrik Sedin (because of injury to ribs), to miss their top remaining center and they lost the gold medal game to the Canadians, 3-0.

Swedish national hockey team general manger Tommy Boustedt accused the International Olympic Committee of sabotaging their medal dream and said he thinks they waited until it would be a real good impact with journalists. After the loss in the gold medal game, Boustedt said he thinks they had the results earlier but chose to hold onto them and they need examples to show they don’t accept doping but this isn’t it.

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Wednesday 03, Oct 2012

  Jamaican Athletes Face Bans For Alleged Doping

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Jamaican Athletes Face Bans For Alleged Doping

@Dominique Blake, 4x400m relay star, and Ricardo Cunningham, national 800m senior champion, would be facing the Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission (JADCO) on October 17 over doping violations returned by the pair at Jamaica’s senior championships in June.

Cunningham tested positive for pseudoephedrine and the substance found in the sample of Blake was not named, according to the Jamaica Observer.

Blake, who has previously served a nine-month ban for testing tested positive for ephedrine at the USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships in Indianapolis, Indiana on June 24, 2006, sent a representative and Cunningham appeared in person at the initial hearing in Kingston on October 2, 2012. The 25-year-old Blake represented Jamaica at the IAAF World Indoor Championships in Turkey in March, where she qualified for the semi-finals of the 400m and also competed at the CAC Games and Commonwealth Games in 2010.

Blake, who finished sixth in the Women’s 400m final in 51.83 seconds, as a relay alternate but did not compete and criticized her omission from the preliminary rounds of the women’s mile relay on August 10 on team politics. Blake, the 2008 NCAA national champion and 2012 World Indoor semi-finalist in 400 m (Istanbul, Turkey), competed on the European circuit from July-August 2008 and was the Hampton Games 2010 silver medalist. She is also a three-time Penn State record holder, Big Ten championship record holder, and six-time Big Ten champion, besides being a seven-time NCCA Championship participant. At the 2006 national outdoors, Blake was a member of the fifth-place mile relay team at the NCAA East Regional Championships that clocked a school-record 3:34.92. At the Big Ten Championships (2007 indoors), Dominique Blake was a member of the gold-medal winning 4×400-meter relay for the second-straight year that set a new conference record (3:37.70).

Cunningham declared that he had taken an over-the-counter medication that may have contained pseudoephedrine, a substance found in most cold medicines. Recently, Cunningham won the men’s 800m final with a time of 1:48.00 seconds at the JAAA/SVL Jamaica Senior National Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston wherein Aldwyn Sappleton finished second in 1:48.43 seconds, while Darryll Oliver was 3rd in 1:48.98 seconds.

Cunningham recorded a personal- and season best-time of 1:49.99 in the 800-meters to finish in the top 15 at Tennessee’s Sea Ray Relays at 2003 Outdoor and posted a season-best time of 3:09.26 to finish third in the IC4As in the 800. Named Sophomore of the Year in 2002, Cunningham was the bronze medalist in the 800 meters at the 1999 Carifta Games. Hraduated from Vere Technical High School in 2000 and from SW Christian Community College in 2002 and competed in soccer for three years at Vere Technical High School in Jamaica.

Just before the Beijing Olympics in 2008, sprinter Julien Dunkley tested positive. In 2009, 200m specialist and 2001 World Championships silver medalist Christopher Williams returned a positive finding at a meet in Europe and was banned for two years. Five athletes returned positive tests after consuming a sport drink during Trials in 2011. The five — Yohan Blake, Allodin Fothergill, Sheri-Ann Brooks, Marvin Anderson, and Lanceford Spence — were all banned for a period of three months. Last November, former Jamaican relay world champion Steve Mullings was given a lifetime ban from competing in athletics after a second doping offence.

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Monday 24, Sep 2012

  Perth Football Club Player Banned

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Perth Football Club Player Banned

The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) has acknowledged decision of the West Australian Football League (WAFL) Anti-Doping Tribunal for imposing a ban of two years on Perth Football Club player Joel Fiegert, for the presence of prohibited substances. The WA Football Commission released findings from a WAFL anti-doping tribunal hearing and said the 21-year-old Fiegert tested positive to an illicit drug prohibited under clause 11.1 of the anti-doping code.

The substances D-amphetamine and D-methamphetamine were detected in a sample that was collected by the ASADA in-competition from Mr Fiegert, following a 30 July 2011 match between Perth and South Fremantle at Brownes Stadium, Western Australia. D-amphetamine and D-methamphetamine are classified as stimulants and are prohibited in-competition, under the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Prohibited List.

Fiegert, who played 13 league matches in four seasons at the Demons, said he was clean and vehemently denied producing a positive test or being suspended at the end of last season. The ban imposed on Fiegert by the WAFL tribunal was backdated to the date of his provisional suspension and he would be ineligible to participate as an athlete or support person until 23 August 2013 in any sports that have adopted a World Anti-Doping Agency compliant anti-doping policy.

Perth president Vince Pendal was believed to be devastated by the information, but he would not discuss it and said we are not making any comment until the process has gone through. Perth Football Club chief executive Marty Atkins said the club supported the tough stance against recreational drugs and added that he club would work with the player and his family to give him the chance to a make a return to the club once the ban had been lifted.

The former Perth Demons midfielder has become the fourth WAFL player in two years to be suspended for testing positive to a banned substance after East Perth’s Kane Goodwin, Swan Districts’ Travis Casserly, and fellow Royal Dean Cadwallader. Goodwin tested positive to cocaine and the anabolic agent Clenbuterol and can play again in June next year. Casserly tested positive to the banned stimulant pseudoephedrine in cold tablets that he used during the 2010 grand final and would be eligible to play next season. Since then, he has visited many clubs for warning players of risks caused by drugs. The ban of Cadwallader for using Nandrolone expired in May.

Joel Fiegert is no longer at the Demons and is working in Karratha and said he is not aware of a positive test. When asked why he didn’t play the last two matches of 2011, Fiegert replied that he had a stress fracture in his foot last year.

The WAFC informed all WAFL presidents of the identity of the suspended player’s club but stayed away from disclosing name of the player. The matter was being overseen by WA Football Commission integrity manager Steve Hargrave, who is the only WAFC official who was authorized to discuss it but said confidentiality requirements meant he could not comment. In 2010, ASADA conducted 24 WAFL tests but doubled that last year and may double again this season at a cost of nearly $100,000.

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Tuesday 22, Sep 2009

  List of 2010 WADA banned substances out by January 1

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List of 2010 WADA banned substances out by January 1According to World Anti-doping Agency (WADA) President John Fahey, the 2010 list of banned substances reflects scientific advances.

Among those added in the list is the stimulant found in cold medicines, pseudoephedrine. According to the agency, the substance showed performance enhancing effects beyond certain doses.

The agency has been monitoring its use for the past five years, particularly the over-the-counter drugs Chlor-Trimeton Nasal Decongestant and Sudafed.

WADA will provide information and education about the use of this over-the-counter medicine. A urinary threshold was also set by the agency for this particular drug.

Salbutamol, an anti-asthma drug, will be allowed in minimal presence at the time of testing. Instead of requiring a Therapeutic Use Exemption, it will require a declaration of use.

“Blood spinning,” a process wherein platelets are segregated and injected into the area of injury to speed up tissue healing was also prohibited if administered through intramuscular injection. Other methods of administration will require a declaration of use.

However, supplemental oxygen, which was one prohibited, is now allowed by the agency.

During WADA’s executive committee meeting in Montreal, Fahey said that the annual revisions are founded on expanding anti-doping knowledge and continuous understanding of doping practices and trends.