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Monday 12, Mar 2012

  Most Indian urban youths take supplements

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According to a survey by industry body Assocham, about 78 percent of adolescents in urban areas of India consume at least one dietary supplement such as pills, energy drinks, steroids, and high-protein powders.

“The statistics are shocking, as many children are becoming overly involved and obsessed by a wide variety of substances that promise to boost energy, appearance, performance, immunity and overall health, even if it shortened their lives,” it said in a statement.

“In addition to that, cash incentives and college admissions through sports quota lure them into taking wrong steps,” Assocham said.

Friday 22, Apr 2011

  Caffeine Can Enhance Athletic Performance

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Caffeine Can Enhance Athletic Performance According to scientists at the University of Birmingham, athletes can benefit from intake of caffeine while providing a performance as it stimulates the absorption of carbohydrates by the human body. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Birmingham’s school of sport and exercise sciences.

It was found during the investigation that the caffeine in sports drinks could increase the absorption of carbohydrates by as much as 26 percent, leading to a sharp advantage for athletes while participating in professional events.

Dr. Asker Jeukendrup, the director of the University’s Human Performance Laboratory, said that if an individual can obtain energy from his or her drinks then he or she is using less energy from the body stores.

Tuesday 07, Sep 2010

  Popular supplement not good for enhancing athletic performance

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Popular supplement not good for enhancing athletic performanceThe antioxidant, quercetin, which is increasingly being marketed as a supplement for boosting athletic performance is no better than a placebo, according to a new study by researchers from University of Georgia.

Quercetin was tested in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study by Professor Kirk Cureton, head of the department of kinesiology in the UGA College of Education, and his colleagues. This was done to assess a variety of measures including ability of the muscles to synthesize energy, strength loss, perceived exertion, and cycling performance following exercise.

The study results appeared in the early online edition of the Journal of Applied Physiology and suggested that use of quercetin did not improve athletic performance in any of the measures they examined.

Monday 12, Jul 2010

  Proteins and sport drinks not a great combination

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Proteins and sport drinks not a great combinationRecent findings from researchers at the McMaster University have suggested that there is no point of adding proteins to sport drinks, which is a common practice with some sportsmen.

Martin Gibala, an Associate Professor of Kinesiology at McMaster, presented findings of the study that disclosed that addition of protein to a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink is not useful for enhancing cycling time trial performance when compared to the sport drink alone.

It was also disclosed by this study that sport drink can be useful only because of carbohydrates, which provides the fuel required to work muscles, and sodium that is effective to maintain fluid balance.

Friday 12, Feb 2010

  Adding protein to sport drinks not worth the effort

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Adding protein to sport drinks not worth the effortAccording to researchers at the McMaster University, adding protein to sport drinks is of no use as no additional benefits are attainable with such a practice.

The researchers noted that protein when added to a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink doesn’t improve cyclic time trial performance when compared with the sport drink alone.

Martin Gibala, an Associate Professor of Kinesiology at McMaster, noted that there is no conclusive evidence suggesting that adding protein to sport drinks is required by athletes though a small amount of protein may prove effective to repair damaged muscles and promotion of training adaptations.

Monday 07, Dec 2009

  Protein addition to sport drinks not advantageous

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Protein addition to sport drinks not advantageousAdding protein to sport drinks is not beneficial in any way, as per findings from researchers at the McMaster University.

It was highlighted through the findings that protein addition to a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink did not enhance cycling time trial performance when compared with the drink alone. It was suggested that the reason why sport drinks are considered beneficial is because of carbohydrate content that provides the fuel for working body muscles and sodium that promotes maintenance of fluid balance.

These findings were revealed by Martin Gibala, an Associate Professor of Kinesiology at McMaster, who remarked that there is nothing to suggest that athletes need protein during exercise sessions though a small amount of protein before exercises is good for repairing damaged muscles and promotion of training adaptations.

 

 

 

Tuesday 11, Aug 2009

  Achievement of maximized energy levels for sporting performance

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Achievement of maximized energy levels for sporting performanceAccording to a recently concluded study by researchers at the University of Hertfordshire, athletes who are training for the London Marathon can expect to deliver dramatic performance by having a close look at what they are eating and drinking.

It was found by Dr Peter Jones, a Senior Lecturer at the University’s School of Life Sciences that there are some food products and drinks, which can help sportsmen attain maximized energy levels while participating at competitive events.

From News-Medical.Net:

“The improvements in performance were only seen when the carbohydrate loaded was low in GI,” said Matt. “The mechanism behind this may be due to the increases seen in blood glucose throughout the time trial.”

Another research project undertaken by postgraduate student, Nick Tiller, found that athletes could maximise their performance through drinking mixed carbohydrate drinks, as opposed to those containing single carbohydrates only.

“This is important because, for example, if you drink commercially available sports drinks, you can only ingest 70 grammes of maltodextrin per hour, which may not be enough to maximise your performance,” said Dr Jones. “But if you supplement this with, for example fructose, you can open up two channels and increase the amount of glucose available to your body.

“There is no doubt but that the foods that we eat have a significant effect on performance. Those in serious training need to give this more thought if they are to maximise their performance.”

It is worthwhile to note that steroids, just like these food products and drinks, can also offer great gains to sportsmen when taken as per medical advice and instructions. Anabolic steroids such as Winstrol, Deca Durabolin, and Clomid have already proved that they are second to none when it comes to offering advantages to sportsmen for delivering amazing performances on a consistent basis. However, it must always be remembered that steroids and sports must not be mixed in the absence of qualified and complete knowledge so that optimum benefits can be achieved from them.

Monday 03, Aug 2009

  Caffeine can boost athletic performance

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Caffeine can boost athletic performanceAccording to scientists at the University of Birmingham, athletes can benefit from intake of caffeine while delivering performance as it boosts absorption of carbohydrates by the human body. The study was conducted by researchers at University of Birmingham’s school of sport and exercise sciences.

It was found during the study that caffeine into sports drinks can enhance the absorption rate of carbohydrates by as much as 26 percent, which can give a distinctive edge to athletes somewhat like steroids while participating in professional events.

Dr. Asker Jeukendrup, the director of the University’s Human Performance Laboratory, was of the view that if an individual can obtain energy from his or her drinks then he or she is using less energy from the body stores. Jeukendrup also said that while caffeine does affect carbohydrates in the body, it cannot be termed as a performance-enhancing substance.

It is important to note here that Caffeine was removed from the World Anti-Doping Agency list of banned substances, way back in January 2004.