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Saturday 27, Aug 2011

  Biomarker useful in testing effectiveness of back pain treatment

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Biomarker useful in testing effectiveness of back pain treatment A new study from researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine has identified a unique protein complex that can be used for predicting whether an epidural steroid injection will help relieve pain caused by a herniated disc in the lower spin.

Gaetano Scuderi, MD, a clinical assistant professor of orthopedic surgery was the senior author of the study to be published in the Aug. 15 edition of Spine.

“There’s about a 50-50 chance that the epidural steroid will work, so most people figure, ‘Hey, I have nothing to lose,’” Scuderi said. “However, there is a significant expense, not to mention the procedural risks and lost productivity.”

Tuesday 01, Jun 2010

  Heel pain alleviation possible with new treatment

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Heel pain alleviation possible with new treatmentUse of an ultrasound-guided technique with steroid injections can be effective by as much as 95 percent when it comes to alleviating the common and painful foot problem called plantar fasciitis.

This finding was disclosed by a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Luca M. Sconfienza, M.D., from Italy’s University of Genoa, said that this new technique is a one-time and effective outpatient procedure when there is no widely accepted therapy for patients when first-line treatments fail to relieve the pain of plantar fasciitis.

Wednesday 07, Apr 2010

  Steroids and tendon injury result in the same tissue changes

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Steroids and tendon injury result in the same tissue changesAccording to a recently concluded study, patients being administered with a steroid injection in their shoulder for rotator cuff pain relief or improved shoulder function must not make a return to their regular activities for a few weeks.

It was remarked during the study that patients returning to rigorous activities after being administered with injections of steroids do not help themselves as the weakened tissue is not able to sustain itself in cases of immediate returns.

Senior study investigator, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, said that steroid injection tend to produce a molecular response in the tissue on a temporary basis, which is similar to that of a tendon injury to make it more vulnerable to damage.

Sunday 14, Mar 2010

  Ultrasound-guided technique with steroid injection for plantar fasciitis

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Ultrasound-guided technique with steroid injection for plantar fasciitisAs per a study that was presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), the combination of an ultrasound-guided technique with steroid injection is 95 percent effective to relieve plantar fasciitis, a common and painful foot problem.

Luca M. Sconfienza, M.D., from Italy’s University of Genoa and lead author of the study, remarked that there is an absence of a widely accepted therapy when first-line treatments fail to relieve the pain of plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis, the most common cause of heel pain, affects approximately one million people on a yearly basis in the United States alone.

Wednesday 18, Nov 2009

  No Standardized approach for back pain with epidural steroid injections

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No Standardized approach for back pain with epidural steroid injectionsResearchers from University of California at San Diego have reported at the American Academy of Pain Medicine’s 25th Annual Meeting that there is a lack of standardized practices existing for administering an epidural steroid injection for back pain.

The researchers considered many factors such as: which steroids were administered, whether or not a local anesthetic was mixed with the steroid, and the amount of steroid used.

Yogesh Patel, MD, and his colleagues at UCSD, remarked that these technique variations can possible give an insight as to how and why some patients get better results from ESI than others and suggested that this fact needs to be explored further.

 

 


Tuesday 13, Oct 2009

  Plantar fasciitis patients now get a relief

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Plantar fasciitis patients now get a reliefAccording to a recent study that was presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), adding an ultrasound-guided technique with steroid injection is 95 percent effective when it comes to relieving plantar fasciitis, a common and painful foot problem.

The new technique was hailed as an effective and one-time outpatient procedure by the study’s lead author, Luca M. Sconfienza, M.D., from Italy’s University of Genoa.

It was remarked by Dr. Sconfienza that this therapy is faster and less painful than shockwave therapy and suggested that patients should first try out noninvasive treatment options before going out for other treatments. It is only when the pain starts becoming really annoying that dry needling with steroid injection is a viable option.

This study is expected to offer a new dimensional approach for finding new and better treatment options for improving the quality standards of life for patients suffering with plantar fasciitis.

Friday 31, Jul 2009

  Steroids found to cause temporary disability after injection

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Steroids found to cause temporary disability after injectionSteroids provide rapid pain relief and anti-inflammatory properties. These properties make it so popular in the treatment of shoulder or rotator cuff injury and other tendon-related injuries. However, a recent study showed that steroids injection can actually produce temporary weakening of the tendons and surrounding tissues right after steroid injection. Patients should rest for a few weeks before returning to their regular activities or begin physical therapy sessions.

According to the senior study investigator Dr. John Callaci, an assistant professor in the Loyola University Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation in Chicago, steroid injection brings about a response to tissues similar to a tendon injury. Tendons usually behave like it thinks it has been acutely injured. It will then produce things that it normally produces when it is injured in order to heal itself. This mechanism may produce temporary instability.

The researchers are currently conducting further research to determine if steroids affect the strength, stress, strain and elasticity of tendons. They are still in the process of investigating the basis of how tendons heal and how steroids may help in the healing process. They further added that they want to determine certain information such as changes in biomechanical properties after steroid injection, amount of scar formation after using steroids and other changes a tissue undergoes after treatment.

According to Dr. Callaci as quoted by Medical News Today:

“We found that steroid injections cause a tendon to behave in a way where it thinks it has been acutely injured,” noted Callaci. “Steroids rapidly provide anti-inflammatory and pain relief. That is why steroids are so popular, but physical therapy also can produce some of the same effects. It just takes longer.”

Friday 10, Jul 2009

  A Final Relief from Plantar Fasciitis

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A Final Relief from Plantar FasciitisAs per a study that was presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), the combination of an ultrasound-guided technique with a steroid injection can prove to be effective by as much as 95 percent to offer relief to patients suffering from plantar fasciitis.

This technique is expected to stand up as an effective and one-time outpatient procedure as per study’s lead author, Luca M. Sconfienza, M.D., from Italy’s University of Genoa.

Plantar fasciitis, which is the most common cause of heel pain, is an inflammation of the plantar fascia (connective tissue) that affects one million people annually in the U.S. alone.

Dr. Sconfienza said that when pain associated with plantar fasciitis becomes annoying then dry-needling with steroid injection proves to be a viable option.

Thursday 18, Jun 2009

  Tendon Tissues Feel Injured When Injected With Steroids

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Tendon Tissues Feel Injured When Injected With SteroidsA Loyola University Health System study suggests that patients who get a steroid injection in their shoulder for rotator cuff pain relief or improved shoulder function should not return to their regular activities or start physical therapy for a few weeks.

According to Dr. John Callaci, steroid injection temporarily produces a molecular response in the tissue that is similar to that of a tendon injury, possibly making it more vulnerable to damage during this time.

In the study, Callaci and colleagues examined the global gene expression profiles in rotator cuff tendons following injury or exposure to corticosteroid. The researchers used gene array analysis of the complete rat genome to characterize the molecular response of rat rotator cuff tendon tissue to injury, injection of corticosteroids, and the presence of both injury and corticosteroid.

The found that steroid injections cause a tendon to behave in a way where it thinks it has been acutely injured, so if the patients return to rigorous activities or physical therapy right after steroid injection, the weakened tissue may not be able to sustain itself.

Friday 12, Jun 2009

  Steroid Injection Treats Carpel Tunnel Syndrome

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Steroid Injection Treats Carpel Tunnel SyndromeCarpel tunnel syndrome causes tingling, numbness and pain in the fingers or hand. Some people even have pain in their arms between their hand and elbow. The symptoms often occur in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. This condition of the wrist resulting from compression of the median nerve that runs from the base of the palm up to the forearm affecting people who perform repetitive hand motions, including computer users, dental hygienists, golfers and tennis players.

The symptoms of carpel tunnel syndrome are usually treated with splinting and pain relievers such as ibuprofen. If these treatments do not work, surgery is performed to decompress the nerves. Fortunately, there is a new way to treat the symptoms of carpel tunnel syndrome without having to undergo surgery – steroid injection.

This option was proven effective when the researchers compared the results between people who had been experiencing symptoms of the condition for at least three months. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either surgery or the steroid injections. They found out that patients who received the injections actually reported better relief of symptoms.