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Friday 25, Jun 2010

  Steroids not good enough to help children with lower respiratory infections

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Steroids not good enough to help children with lower respiratory infectionsAccording to a study published in an issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, medications containing steroids are not effective for improving respiratory symptoms or preventing hospitalization among infants suffering with bronchiolitis.

Findings of the study truly highlights the power of a research network such as Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) in providing answers to otherwise difficult-to-answer questions, according to Nathan Kuppermann, M.D., a professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the University of California, Davis, chair of the PECARN network’s steering committee and the senior investigator of the study.

These findings by PECARN offer critical implications for medical practitioners to treat bronchiolitis, one of the most common causes of infant hospitalization.

Wednesday 14, Apr 2010

  Children suffering from lower respiratory infections not beneficiaries of steroids

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Children suffering from lower respiratory infections not beneficiaries of steroidsThe use of medication based on steroids do not prove effective to prevent hospitalization and improving respiratory symptoms concerned with treating bronchilitis, a common viral lower respiratory infection in infants.

This finding was disclosed in a study published in the July 26 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

Nathan Kuppermann, M.D., a professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the University of California, Davis, chair of the PECARN (Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network) network’s steering committee and the senior investigator of the study, said that power of a research network such as PECARN to resolve difficult-to-answer questions gets highlighted by such studies.

Sunday 14, Feb 2010

  Children with lower respiratory infections do not benefit from steroid use

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Children with lower respiratory infections do not benefit from steroid useThe use of steroid medications for the purpose of inhibiting hospitalization or improving respiratory symptoms caused by bronchiolitis, a common viral lower respiratory infection in infants, is of no use.

This finding was revealed in a study published in an issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

It was remarked by Nathan Kuppermann, M.D., a professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the University of California, Davis, chair of the PECARN network’s steering committee, and the senior investigator of the study, that the study truly highlights the power of a research network such as PECARN to find amicable answers to difficult-to-answer questions.

Tuesday 09, Feb 2010

  Children with lower respiratory infections are not beneficiaries of steroids

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Children with lower respiratory infections are not beneficiaries of steroidsThe administration of steroid medications may not be useful when it comes to preventing hospitalization or improving respiratory symptoms for treating young children suffering with bronchiolitis, a common viral lower respiratory infection in infants.

The findings by Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) are considered to offer invaluable insights on how to move ahead for treating one of the most common causes of infant hospitalization.

Nathan Kuppermann, M.D., a professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the University of California, Davis, chair of the PECARN network’s steering committee, and the senior investigator of the study, remarked that this study suggested the effectiveness of a research network such as PECARN for resolving difficult-to-answer questions.

Tuesday 22, Dec 2009

  Steroid medications not effective for children with lower respiratory infections

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Steroid medications not effective for children with lower respiratory infectionsAccording to a study published in the July 26 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, the use of steroid medications is not effective for preventing hospitalization or improving respiratory symptoms when it comes to treating bronchiolitis, a common viral lower respiratory infection in infants.

These findings by the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) are considered to provide qualified guidance for treating one of the most common causes of infant hospitalization.

Nathan Kuppermann, M.D., a professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the University of California, Davis, chair of the PECARN network’s steering committee, and the senior investigator of the study, said that the study highlights the power of a research network such as PECARN for resolving difficult-to-answer questions.

Tuesday 15, Dec 2009

  Obesity can minimize response to medications

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Obesity can minimize response to medicationsAccording to a study by National Jewish Health researchers, being obese or overweight does not worsen asthma in patients with mild or moderate disease forms but it can minimize the response to medications.

Lead author E. Rand Sutherland, Associate Professor of Medicine at National Jewish Health, and lead author of the paper appearing in the June 2009 issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, said that there is a possible link between asthma and obesity.

This study suggests that people with asthma must make efforts for ensuring that body weight stays normal as excess of body weight may mean a less responsive body to steroid medications.

Wednesday 18, Nov 2009

  John Hopkins experts advise greater caution for COPD sufferers

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John Hopkins experts advise greater caution for COPD sufferersLung disease experts at Johns Hopkins have advocated for greater caution in prescribing inhaled corticosteroids for COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) sufferers.

This call for caution came after evidence suggested that inhaled corticosteroids, one of the most widely used anti-inflammatory medications, increase the risk of pneumonia by a full third.

This study is expected to provide a great relief to existing 120,000 Americans suffering from COPD, which is expected to become the nation’s third leading cause of death in the United States by the year 2020.

 


Tuesday 25, Aug 2009

  Call for caution in prescribing inhaled corticosteroids to COPD patients

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Call for caution in prescribing inhaled corticosteroids to COPD patients  According to lung disease experts at Johns Hopkins, there is a great need for caution by physicians in prescribing inhaled corticosteroids for patients with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). This finding was revealed after it was found out that anti-inflammatory medications increase the risk of pneumonia by a full third.

It is presently estimated that more than 11 million Americans, most of them former or current smokers, are suffering from COPD that is characterized by the fatal and lung-diminishing conditions of emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

From News-Medical.Net:

Senior study investigator and critical care specialist Eddy Fan, M.D., says the results of the analysis should not alarm patients or cause them to stop taking their medications but should spur physicians to screen and monitor their patients to find the lowest possible steroid dose that works, especially in the elderly, people with immune system problems, and people who have had multiple bouts of pneumonia and for whom repeat bacterial infection might be a life-threatening complication.

Inhaled corticosteroids are not of equal benefit to all, and what we are seeing is that the treatment may be more harmful and pose a greater risk of harm to some,” says Fan, an instructor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“Physicians really need to strongly evaluate a patient’s individual characteristics before prescribing these steroid medications, and patients, in turn, should weigh the risks and benefits of taking the drugs, despite their proven record in providing symptomatic relief,” he says.

According to pulmonologist M. Brad Drummond, M.D., M.H.S., who led the study, “catching this bacterial infection can seriously disrupt quality of life, making it harder for COPD patients to breathe and possibly leading to hospitalization.”

Fan says that COPD is expected to become the third leading cause of death in the United States by 2020, behind heart ailments and cancer and ahead of stroke.

During the study, it was advised that physicians need to exercise a higher sense of caution than what is observed by them nowadays so that inhaled corticosteroids do not pose any danger to health of their patients. For this, patients and their families need to be made aware of the pros and cons of inhaled corticosteroid trearment.

Thursday 18, Jun 2009

  Steroid Medications Ineffective In Treating Bronchiolitis

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Steroid Medications Ineffective In Treating BronchiolitisBronchiolitis infections begin most frequently with a fever, runny nose, coughing, and wheezing. Most children recover from the illness in eight to 15 days. The majority of children hospitalized for bronchiolitis infections are under 6 months old. This viral infection on infants is the leading cause of hospitalization for infants in the United States and accounts for more than 100,000 admissions each year.

This disease is usually treated with steroid medication called dexamethasone. This is a glucocorticoid form of steroid medication. But in the study made by the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN), steroid medications and the standard placebo treatment produce similar results.

The group concluded that glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone aren’t effective in treating bronchiolitis among infants. Although, experts still believe that steroid medications remain the best options in treating other respiratory illnesses such as asthma and croup.

Wednesday 10, Jun 2009

  Asthma Drugs to be continued for Continued Benefit

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Asthma Drugs to be continued for Continued BenefitAs per a new study, children who were administered with steroids to treat asthma in the past have not shown those improvements after stopping the steroid treatment. The results were observed after the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) clinical trial announced its findings on more than 1,000 children in the age group of 5-12 years.

It was found that children, who are now in their late teens, administered with steroid treatment in the past and stopped now showed no differences in asthma management when they were compared with children who received the placebo.

Robert C. Strunk, M.D., a Washington University pediatrician at St. Louis Children’s Hospital and lead author of the study, remarked that it was interesting to notice that children appeared to do better with the passage of age.

Inhaled corticosteroids such as budesonide have been known to be one of the most effective forms of anti-inflammatory treatments for asthma management via improving pulmonary function.

The study suggested that if a patient is cured from asthma after using steroid treatment, he should not stop using asthma medications or think that asthma is completely cured. It was found during the study that continued benefits of steroid medications require continued usage.