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Monday 15, Feb 2010

  Children may find it difficult to handle chicken pox and steroids

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Children may find it difficult to handle chicken pox and steroidsChildren who suffer from chicken pox and administered with steroids run an increased risk of a more severe case of the virus leading to death.

This finding was disclosed by pediatric oncologists at the Brenner Children’s Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Chicken Pox, though mild in its nature, may turn fatal in acute cases. Prior to the discovery of varicella vaccine, around 12,000 people used to die from chicken pox on a yearly basis.

Monday 01, Feb 2010

  Some asthmatic children less responsive to steroids

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Some asthmatic children less responsive to steroidsAccording to a study, some children suffering from asthma are genetically less responsive to inhaled corticosteroids.

It was remarked by researcher Gregory Sawicki, M.D. of Children’s Hospital in Boston, that there can be many reasons for this finding.

Dr. Sawicki noted that many studies of asthmatic adults have already suggested that even rigorous use of inhaled steroids does not lead to well controlled asthma in all adults.

This data came from the Child Asthma Management Program Continuation Study (CAMPCS), one of the largest groups of children with mild to moderate asthma in the nation who have been followed over 10 years.

Tuesday 26, Jan 2010

  Anti-inflammatory steroid use can increase risk of death

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Anti-inflammatory steroid use can increase risk of deathAccording to a new review of studies about the use of anti-inflammatory steroids for traumatic head injuries such as car crashes, the risk of death is increased due to such usage.

This analysis that was published by the British-based Cochrane Library draws heavily from a study of corticosteroid treatment for brain injury involving more than 10,000 patients.

Dr. Phil Alderson, lead author of the Cochrane study, said that the considerable increase in death with steroids found participating in the trial suggests that steroids are no longer to be routinely used in patients with traumatic head injury.

This review appeared in the January issue of The Cochrane Library, a publication of the Cochrane Collaboration that evaluates medical research.

Monday 04, Jan 2010

  Steroid treatment can prevent a third of miscarriages

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Steroid treatment can prevent a third of miscarriagesA course of steroids may all that be required to help some women who have suffered repeated miscarriages or failed IVF treatments, as per a conference in Liverpool in the UK.

This research was presented at the British Association conference and suggested that many of the 3,000 unexplained miscarriages every year can be prevented with the use of steroids.

Dr. Siobhan Quenby, of the University of Liverpool and the Liverpool Women’s Hospital said that tests involving 120 women had ascertained natural killer cells as a cause of miscarriages and failed IVF embryo implants.

Dr. Quenby, in partnership with the Miscarriage Association, is looking for 40 women with a history of miscarriages and high levels of natural killer cells to take part in a trial.

Saturday 26, Dec 2009

  Cancer drug in making may prove effective for Asthma

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Cancer drug in making may prove effective for AsthmaA new research by scientists at the University of Edinburgh has suggested that R-roscovitine, a drug presently being tested for treating cancer can help asthmatic patients to a considerable extent.

It was revealed that this drug can help in killing specific immune cells to exacerbate asthma symptoms. This finding is expected to offer an alternative way for treating asthma in steroid-resistant patients.

It was remarked by the involved researchers that usage of this drug caused the eosinophil cells to undergo a form of cell death known as apoptosis, which is a natural process wherein unwanted cells are removed from the human body.

Friday 25, Dec 2009

  New ray of hope for deaf from immune system attack

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New ray of hope for deaf from immune system attackA new research at the University of Michigan’s Kresge Hearing Research Institute has brought hopes to thousands of patients who turned deaf due to an immune system attack.

The study may help patients in ascertaining if steroids can help them and also if they can be spared from harsh side effects of steroids.

According to senior author Thomas Carey, Ph.D., a professor and distinguished research scientist at the U-M Medical School and department chair in the School of Dentistry, the study results strongly suggest that an accurate prediction concerning the hope of patients for regaining hearing abilities with steroid treatment may be a possibility with a direct test for antibodies.


Friday 18, Dec 2009

  Steroid treatment for bronchiolitis does not work

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Steroid treatment for bronchiolitis does not workAccording to a new study co-authored by Dr. Joan Bregstein of the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian and Columbia University Medical Center, steroid treatment is not effective for helping infants with a common and potentially serious viral lower respiratory infection called bronchiolitis.

It was revealed during the study that steroids do not prevent hospitalization or improve respiratory symptoms for bronchiolitis, which is considered to be the most common cause of infant hospitalization.

It was suggested that simple supportive care is the best treatment option for bronchiolitis though steroid-based medications play an important role in respiratory illnesses of childhood such as asthma and croup.

Tuesday 15, Dec 2009

  New hope for asthmatic patients possibly lies in a potential cancer drug

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New hope for asthmatic patients possibly lies in a potential cancer drug  R-roscovitine, a potential cancer drug, that is used to kill specific immune cells exacerbating asthma symptoms could also help patients suffering from asthma, according to a recently concluded research.

Scientists at the University of Edinburgh said that R-roscovitine can prove to be an effective alternative way for treating asthma in patients who show resistance to steroids that are commonly used in treatments related to asthma.

Professor Adriano Rossi, of the Centre for Inflammation Research at the University of Edinburgh who directed the study, remarked that steroids though useful for treating asthma can have some side effects. Moreover, some asthmatic patients are resistant to steroid treatment. This is where R-Roscovitine, an alternative to steroids, can be used in conjunction with steroid treatment for asthma patients.

Thursday 03, Dec 2009

  Young boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy can now walk for longer

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Young boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy can now walk for longerAs per results of a recently concluded study, boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy can walk for longer on their own after getting themselves treated with daily steroid treatment. It was also remarked during the study that steroid treatment can help them reduce the risk of scoliosis to a significant extent.

The results were part of a published study in an issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

However, it was remarked that benefits of steroid treatment for boys with muscular dystrophy may come at the cost of some side effects and doctors must be highly careful while advising steroid treatment.

 


Monday 23, Nov 2009

  Children with Kawasaki’s disease can benefit from steroids

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Children with Kawasaki's disease can benefit from steroidsAccording to a study that was published in an issue of Pediatrics, steroids can prove their real worth when it comes to reducing damage to the heart in children with Kawasaki’s disease.

This study was quick to highlight knowledge gap among members of the medical fraternity for treating Kawasaki’s disease since the present guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics suggest that there is little evidence for suggesting the effectiveness of steroids for treating children with Kawasaki’s disease and reducing damage to the heart.

Stephen Aronoff, MD, lead author of the meta-analysis and Temple University School of Medicine professor and chair of pediatrics, said that a multi-center study will be more than useful in justifying steroid treatment benefits for Kawasaki’s disease.

The study also brought forward recommendations being made available for the standard treatment of Kawasaki’s via aspirin and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG).

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