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Wednesday 24, Oct 2012

  Track And Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Track and field athlete accepts sanction

Matthew DiBuono, of New Rochelle, N.Y., an athlete in the sport of track and field, has tested positive for prohibited substances in multiple samples, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 24-year-old DiBuono accepted a suspension for his doping offense. The offense pertains to a sample provided by the athlete at the 2011 USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships in Eugene, Oregon that resulted in adverse analytical finding for the administration of synthetic steroids.

During an out-of-competition test on August 4, 2011, a subsequent sample collected from DiBuono resulted in an adverse analytical finding for the presence of metabolites of the steroid, stanozolol. Both the tests reflected the presence of anabolic agents that are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the rules of the International Association of Athletic Federations, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”) and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List.

This case was an “aggravating circumstances” case, under the rules of the Code and this allowed the USADA to increase the standard two-year period of ineligibility to the maximum under the Code of a four-year period of ineligibility. In the case, those circumstances included the use of multiple prohibited substances on multiple occasions.

A four-year period of ineligibility was accepted by DiBuono and it began on August 17, 2011, the day he accepted a provisional sanction. DiBuono is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to June 23, 2011, the day the first sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the violation.

The former Fordham Male Student-Athlete of the Year qualified for the 2011 U.S. Outdoor Track & Field National Championship and holds the Fordham school record in the hammer throw at 214′ 4″, competed for Shore AC at a meet held at West Point on June 1st, recording a mark of 76.60 meters or 251′ 4″ in the hammer throw. This distance surpassed the U.S. “A” Standard qualifying mark of 69.00 meters or 226′ 4″ for U.S. Nationals to make him the first former Fordham athlete to make the National Championship since Lauren Gubicza did in the early 1990s. His mark of 251′ 4″ is the second-best mark by any U.S. competitor this year, behind only Kibwé Johnson of the New York Athletic Club (NYAC) at 262′ 9″ (80.09 meters) that was set in Uberlándia, Brazil on May 18th, 2011.

 The mark also ranks him currently 14th in the world, based on the current listing on HammerThrow.eu. He was a three-time Atlantic 10 champion in the hammer throw, a two-time Athlete of the Meet at the Metropolitan Championship, and the 2009 Vincent T. Lombardi Award winner as Male Student-Athlete of the Year. His throw of 239’ – 8” in Eugene, Oregon with the 16 pound hammer placed him third and officially earned him a spot on the USA National Team which will compete at the Track and Field World Championships in Daegu, South Korea.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Track And Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

Saturday 19, May 2012

  Bodybuilding.com agrees to pay fine for violation

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Bodybuilding.com’s former president, Jeremy DeLuca, has agreed to pay $600,000 besides the company fine as part of a plea agreement with federal prosecutors on similar misdemeanor violations of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

CEO Ryan DeLuca pleaded guilty in April to drug misbranding misdemeanor charges and agreed to pay a $500,000 fine.

The company said it is “pleased to confirm an agreement has been reached that brings the (Food and Drug Administration’s ) 2009 investigation to a close. Industry-leading regulatory compliance and world-class customer service continue to be top priorities for the company.”

Saturday 10, Dec 2011

  DiBuono suspended for four years

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Hammer thrower Matthew DiBuono of New Rochelle, N.Y., has accepted a suspension of four years after testing positive for the presence of anabolic agents.

DiBuono tested positive for the presence of synthetic steroids, according to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

All the competitive results of the tainted player since June 23 have been disqualified.

Thursday 15, Sep 2011

  Products marked as dietary supplements are potentially dangerous

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expressed concern about undeclared or deceptively labeled ingredients in products marketed as dietary supplements, in a letter sent to manufacturers of dietary supplements.

These substances include the active ingredients in FDA-approved drugs or their analogs, or other compounds, such as novel synthetic steroids.

The FDA has also announced a new RSS feed to warn consumers more quickly about tainted products marketed as dietary supplements.

Friday 11, Feb 2011

  FDA expresses concerns over ingredients in products marketed as dietary supplements

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FDA expresses concerns over ingredients in products marketed as dietary supplementsThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently expressed concerns over undeclared or deceptively labeled ingredients in products marketed as dietary supplements.

These substances include the active ingredient in FDA-approved drugs, or other compounds, such as novel synthetic steroids, that do not qualify as dietary ingredients.

A new RSS feed was announced by the FDA for issuing a quick warning to consumers about tainted products marketed as dietary supplements.

Saturday 31, Jul 2010

  New technique identification by researchers

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New technique identification by researchersA new technique meant to prevent doping in sports has been identified according to a finding revealed by a research published in the journal Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry.

This technique has the potential of identifying the presence of natural and synthetic steroids in the body.

The technique was formulated by scientists from Imperial College London and the University of Nottingham and could be used by anti-doping officials to examine cheating in sports.

Wednesday 17, Feb 2010

  Reduced death risk not linked with corticosteroids

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Reduced death risk not linked with corticosteroidsThe addition of corticosteroids in addition to other treatment forms to provide relief to children with bacterial meningitis is not linked with a reduced risk of death or shorter stay at the hospital.

This finding was revealed in a study in an issue of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.

As per the background information in the article, use of corticosteroids (synthetic steroids for reducing inflammation) in a combination with primary therapy for bacterial meningitis in men reduces mortality while the potential benefit of steroids remains unclear in children.

Tuesday 18, Aug 2009

  New Technique can prove effective for spotting use of banned substances

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New Technique can prove effective for spotting use of banned substancesAccording to a research published today in the Journal Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, a new technique can offer a new dimensional approach in spotting use of banned substances by athletes.

This technique is expected to help doping staff and drug officials to distinguish between the presence of synthetically manufactured and naturally occurring human steroids in the body. It is interesting to note here that though naturally occurring and synthetic steroids are somehow similar in nature, there seems to be a difference in the ratio of ‘heavy’ carbon to ‘light’ carbon they contain.

From News-Medical.Net:

The new approach, developed by scientists from Imperial College London and the University of Nottingham, allows easy analysis of the carbon ratio. It uses a catalytic reaction to strip steroids of their more aggressive parts whilst leaving the carbon ‘skeleton’ intact. This technique, called hydropyrolysis, is commonly used to aid oil exploration by freeing small fragments of organic matter from petroleum rock sources.

Dr Mark Sephton, from Imperial’s Department of Earth Science and Engineering and lead author of the research, explained: “The type of carbon in the body’s molecules reflects the carbon ingested as part of an athlete’s diet, and if you can work out the carbon ratio in the molecules you can determine the source of the carbon.

“Drug cheats should beware. The carbon-based secrets of steroids are now apparent to the analyst. Thanks to our technique, in the future it will be much more difficult to escape detection when using performance-enhancing steroids“, he added.

The next step of researchers is to extend the present findings onto pure samples of steroid molecules. It is believed that the new technique will help in curbing use of steroids in sports to enhance the image of sports, which has been tarnished by steroid-taking athletes and other sportsmen in the last few years.