27/01/2022 3:10 am Welcome to isteroids.com - BLOG

Monday 22, Jul 2013

  Chris Froome Wins Tour De France 2013

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Chris Froome Wins Tour De France 2013

Christopher Froome, the Kenyan-born British professional road racing cyclist who rides for UCI ProTeam Team Sky, has won the Tour de France 2013. Froome became the hot favorite to bring home the honors after Bradley Wiggins pulled out of this year’s race through injury.

Froome vowed his victory wouldn’t be stripped for doping as were of Lance Armstrong and added that this is one yellow jersey that will stand the test of time. The rider said he has also believed in people who have turned out to be cheats and liars but assured everyone that he is not a cheat. Chris Froome had to ride through a barrage of doubt and skepticism, especially since his strength in the mountains and time trials reminded some cycling lovers of Armstrong and the way he and his team used to suffocate the race.

Froome hugged his Team Sky manager Chris Brailsford first and the pair were very close to tears. The rider toasted his Team Sky colleagues in an accompanying car and remarked it is difficult for him to put it into words and the race has been a fight every single day. The British rider who dominated rivals over three weeks on the road became the second British in succession to win the Tour after Bradley Wiggins in 2012. He dedicated his victory to his late mother, Jane, who died in 2008 and remarked he would probably be at home watching on TV without her encouragement to follow his dreams.

After this win, Froome remarked to win the 100th edition is an honor beyond any he had dreamed and the rider was soon joined by five-time winners Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault, and Miguel Indurain on the podium. Olympic gold medalist Victoria Pendleton praised the efforts of Chris Froome, calling him an “absolutely phenomenal athlete”.

Chris Froome, Nairo Quintana, and Joaquim Rodriguez — who were the 100th edition’s podium finisher — have never failed a drug test or been directly implicated in any of cycling doping scandals, a notable departure both from the Armstrong era.

Froome turned professional in 2007 at the age of 22 with Team Konica Minolta and moved to Team Sky in 2010. In October 2009, Froome represented England at the 2010 Commonwealth Games, in Delhi, coming fifth in the time trial. He made his breakthrough as a Grand Tour contender during the 2011 Vuelta a España where he finished second overall. At the 2012 Tour de France, Froome riding as a domestique for Bradley Wiggins, won stage seven that culminated on a steep uphill finish and finished second overall, behind only the win of Bradley Wiggins in the same race as the best British performance in the history of Tour de France. Froome also won the bronze medal in the time trial event at the Olympic Games and finished fourth in the Vuelta a España in 2012. The rider’s first stage race win came in 2013, in the Tour of Oman, followed by wins in the Criterium International, the Tour de Romandie, the Critérium du Dauphiné, and the Tour de France.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Chris Froome Wins Tour De France 2013

Wednesday 17, Jul 2013

  Chris Froome Must Get Used To Answering Doping Questions, Says Holm

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Chris Froome Must Get Used To Answering Doping Questions, Says Holm

Chris Froome of Team Sky and other professional cycling stars must get used to batting away questions about doping as past controversies mean cycling deserves to be treated with suspicion, Omega Pharma-Quick Step’s Danish sporting director Brian Holm said.

On the Tour de France’s first rest day, Holm said people keep bringing it up because we deserve it, so you cannot be angry about being asked the question. He added that we have got a strong tradition for doping in cycling and we’ve been lying for so many years. The Danish sporting director, who himself admitted to doping while riding during the 1990s, made these comments after many doubted the extraordinary performance on Chris Froome and Team Sky at stage 8 in which the Team Sky rider produced the third-fastest time ever in the climb to the finish at Ax 3 Domaines in the Pyrénées.

Meanwhile, president of cycling’s global governing body said he thinks the riders deserve another thing than to be asked about doping as the first question when they show up in the press conference. Pat McQuaid remarked the first questions the riders had to answer were about doping and he thinks it is unfortunate. He added that the media have to understand the riders of today don’t deserve to be judged on the mistakes of their predecessors, of the riders of a generation of the past now and riders of today need to be respected for what they are trying to do, which is to race clean and race without a doping program.

Holm disagreed to the statements made by the UCI president and said if you ask me straight, I wouldn’t lie. He said he believes Froome is clean and he really thinks so, and he thinks Bradley Wiggins was clean when he won last year. Holm went on to add that if it’s not true it would break his heart and he can understand Chris Froome being a little annoyed at being asked the question, but we need to be open-minded and try not to let it get to us when these things happen.

Froome came to the 100th edition as the man to beat after he finished runner-up to teammate Bradley Wiggins last year in a dominant campaign by Team Sky. The rider said while replying to questions on doping that he is racing “100 percent” clean at the world’s biggest and most notorious bike race. He also remarked today’s peloton is racing far cleaner than those of five to 10 years ago and went on to say any of the results now are definitely a lot more credible and the question should be asked about people who were winning races maybe five, 10 years ago, when we know doping was a lot more prevalent. The Team sky rider also said it’s the unfortunate position we find ourselves in at the moment and added eyebrows are going to be raised, questions are going to be raised about our performances. The rider also remarked that he knows the sport has changed and there is absolutely no way that he would be able to get these results if it hadn’t changed.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Chris Froome Must Get Used To Answering Doping Questions, Says Holm

Friday 30, Nov 2012

  Bobby Julich Leaves Team Sky

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Bobby Julich Leaves Team Sky

American coach Bobby Julich became the victim of Team Sky’s anti-doping purge after he confessed to drug offenses fourteen years ago and team principal Dave Brailsford admitted it was “highly likely” further backroom staff will be sacked.

Brailsford recently asked staff and riders to confirm that they had no history of doping as cycling tries to clean itself in the wake of the Lance Armstrong doping scandal. A teammate of Armstrong at Motorola and Cofidis between 1995 and 1997, Julich has now admitted to doping during the late 1990s, when he finished third in the Tour de France.

Brailsford remarked it is painful and it is the cost of being at the forefront of people being able to believe that we can do it clean and further added that Bobby has shown courage in admitting to the errors he made long before his time with Team Sky and it is critical to emphasize that there have been no doubts about his work with Team Sky or his approach as a coach and Julich has done a good job and been a good colleague during his two years with Team Sky.

Brailsford also remarked that Team Sky has made its commitment clear to being a clean team and it believes this is the right thing to do although it is never easy to part. The Team Sky Head said the attention is bound now to turn to senior directeur sportif Sean Yates, who also rode with Armstong at Motorola and helped coach him at the 2005 Tour de France with Discovery and again four years later with Astana. Julich insisted that he stopped making the use of performance enhancing drugs in 1998 after finishing third in the Tour and his then fiancée Angela, now his wife, stumbled across his drug use.

Julich, an Olympic silver medalist in the 2004 time-trial, has been a time-trial coach at Sky for two years and his role included working closely with time-trial specialists such as Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome. The cyclist will receive an undisclosed parachute payment from Sky under the interview and disclosure system Sky have put in place after the United States Anti-Doping Agency report but his contract would have been terminated without any financial package if he had failed to admit his doping past, and it subsequently came to light.

Julich made a full confession to his doping past when he met Brailsford and elaborated further last night when he published an open letter to “Sky, family, friends, fans and supporters of cycling” and said those days were different from today and he knew that he was doing wrong over those two years but the attitude surrounding the use of EPO in the peloton was so casual and accepted that he personally lost perspective of the gravity of the situation.

Although Tour de France victory of Brad Wiggins in the Sky colors this summer has widely been accepted as clean and untainted, leading anti-doping scientist Michael Ashenden has warned that nobody can be considered above suspicion.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Bobby Julich Leaves Team Sky

Thursday 15, Nov 2012

  Team Sky Head Praises Zero Tolerance Policy

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Team Sky Head Praises Zero Tolerance Policy

Dave Brailsford has remarked that the anti-doping policy of the team may hurt them in the short term but its impact in the long term will surely make it worthwhile.

The Team Sky Head said the team was started with a very clear policy and it will try to recruit the riders and the staff who had not had previous convictions for doping and had no previous involvement in doping to the best of our knowledge. Brailsford added that it was critical to stick with the policy and there may be some pain in the short term, some medium-term pain, potentially and maybe even some performance pain, to get to our vision and objectives.

The team recently asked its riders and management to sign a pledge declaring they have never doped. After this, sports director Steven de Jongh and coach Bobby Julich have quit. De Jongh left his role as sporting director at Team Sky after he admitted to making the use of performance enhancing drugs during his cycling career, while Julich went after admitted to using the blood-boosting agent EPO as a rider. Sporting director Sean Yates also retired from cycling after spending three decades in the sport though the team insisted that it was his decision and was not related to doping.

This pledge came in the wake of the Lance Armstrong doping scandal wherein the Texan rider was accused by the United States Anti-Doping Agency of using and promoting the use of performance enhancing drugs and even pressuring riders of the team to do the same.

Founded in 2010, Team Sky set the goal to win the Tour de France within five years and achieved its target in only its third season when Britain’s Bradley Wiggins won the race this summer.

Wiggins meanwhile is back home after spending a night in hospital after a bike crash. Britain’s Tour de France winner and the Olympic champion was treated for rib and hand injuries after he collided with a vehicle near a petrol station close to his Lancashire home. Team Sky confirmed that the 32-year-old Team Sky rider had sustained only minor injuries and was kept at the Royal Preston Hospital as a precaution and no long-term injury problems are suspected. The incident took place in the village of Wrightington, near Wigan, at around 18:00 GMT on November 7, 2012. A father of two, the cyclist is among the favorites to be named the BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year after he became the first British winner of the Tour de France in July.

In a separate incident, British Cycling head coach Shane Sutton was involved in a bike crash in Manchester while pedalling along the A6 in Manchester suburb Levenshulme on Thursday morning in a collision with a blue Peugeot 206 being driven by a 61-year-old man. The head coach at Team Sky was diagnosed with bleeding on the brain after a bike crash in Manchester. Sutton was conscious and breathing when taken by ambulance to Salford Royal Hospital, the North West Ambulance Service said and is now in a stable condition.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Team Sky Head Praises Zero Tolerance Policy

Tuesday 13, Nov 2012

  Team Sky Policy Attacked By WADA Chief

Posted By
Pin it Share on Tumblr

Team Sky Policy Attacked By WADA Chief

Team Sky has been criticized by David Howman, the World Anti-Doping Agency chief executive, for their zero-tolerance approach to drug-taking. Howman said cycling cannot afford to lose those who knew about doping in the sport as it makes an attempt to clean up its act.

The WADA Chief said the hardline stance of Team Sky will not encourage riders and officials with a history of performance enhancing drugs to divulge evidence because of a fear they will lose their job. Howman added that there will not be many who will reveal the truth if they fear about losing their jobs and said zero tolerance does not make much of a sense in the overall efforts of cleaning up cycling. He further added that WADA in general is concerned as we are losing people who knew about doping and what all happened and we should actually make them feel free to come forward and said if they have a fear of losing their positions, that will be a regrettable loss of opportunity to clean the sport.

Team Sky race coach, Bobby Julich, and directeur sportif Steven de Jongh have left the team after they admitted to having a history of performance enhancing drugs.

Meanwhile, the Australian Olympic Committee is introducing a statutory declaration and oath for all its team members wherein anyone who is found to have lied on oath could be jailed for up to seven years. Howman said: “I would like to see another step before that, more of the carrot and less of the stick.”

When the team was first established in 2009, riders and officials signed initial team contracts that contained “protections and remedies that would be expected” in relation to doping, Team Sky said and added that after the recent reaffirmation process that offered a payment to those who confessed and left the team, the organization believes the team is clean.

Fahey added that those in charge of cycling at the time of Armstrong scandal should bear some of the responsibility and added that “everybody doped” in cycling during the Lance Armstrong era. Twenty six people, including 11 former teammates of Lance Armstrong, testified before the USADA that the disgraced cyclist and his team made use of trafficked in banned drugs and also made use of blood transfusions, and Lance pressured others to do so.

Fahey added that cycling will be able to regain credibility only after the senior officials on watch during the “debacle” were removed so that its millions of supporters around the world will watch and support the sport going forward and said anyone involved during the Armstrong years could not justify their place in the hierarchy of the sport at the UCI. The WADA Chief said he looks forward to seeing what the UCI proposes to do to ensure the Armstrong “debacle” does not happen again.

UCI president Pat McQuaid, who has held the position since 2006, meanwhile warned against blaming authorities of the sport for the doping scandal; his predecessor Hein Verbruggen was at the helm during Armstrong’s reign.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Team Sky Policy Attacked By WADA Chief

« Prev