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Wednesday 30, Jan 2013

  Latest Doping Scandal May Spell End For Alex Rodriguez

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Latest Doping Scandal May Spell End For Alex Rodriguez

A South Florida-based alternative weekly has linked many players to a clinic in Miami that is shown to have distributed performance enhancing drugs like human growth hormone, synthetic testosterone, and other substances banned by baseball.

The biggest name involved is Alex Rodriguez and other players named included Toronto Blue Jays outfielder Melky Cabrera, Texas Rangers outfielder Nelson Cruz, and San Diego Padres catcher Yasmani Grandal. Other baseball players who appeared in the records include Washington pitcher Gio Gonzalez, who finished third in last year’s NL Cy Young Award voting, besides pro tennis player Wayne Odesnik, and budding Cuban superstar boxer Yuriorkis Gamboa along with UM baseball conditioning guru Jimmy Goins, according to the newspaper.

A disgruntled employee of a Miami-based clinic called Biogenesis gave documents to the Miami New Times that are being evaluated by the New York Yankees. The documents purported to show that A-Rod paid for testosterone cream, human growth hormone, and IGF-1, as recently as last spring. Rodriguez, in the past, said that he stopped making use of performance enhancing drugs after 2003 and issued a statement disavowing any relationship with the man in charge of the clinic, Anthony Bosch. Other players listed in the report like Washington Nationals pitcher Gio Gonzalez also issued denials.

A release issued by Major League Baseball disclosed that three of the players including Toronto Blue Jays outfielder Melky Cabrera who were linked to the clinic had in fact been suspended by baseball. Cabrera was signed a $18-million (U.S.) free-agent contract for two years with Toronto this winter after he was suspended for 50 games and missed out on the San Francisco Giants’ 2012 World Series run because of a failed drug test indicating elevated testosterone levels.

The name of Cabrera among the list of players supposedly serviced by Bosch and Biogenesis shocked Blue Jays fans and notes given to the New Times referring to Cabrera are dated December 21, 2011 and include a hand-written note from Bosch expressing anger at the baseball star for $9,000 Bosch says he is owed. The paper cites Bosch as complaining that he put his business and all his doctors at risk by fabricating patient charts and phony prescriptions to help him.

But the entire focus in on Alex Rodriguez and many believe this may be his BALCO scandal. With the baseball icon not liked anymore by the Yankees fans, there seems to be no respite for A-Rod as no one would care if he never returns to the game. The baseball’s highest-paid star and the three-time AL MVP refuted claims that he purchased human growth hormone and other performance-enhancing substances during 2009-12 from Biogenesis of America LLC, a now-closed anti-aging clinic in Coral Cables, Fla., near the off-season home of A-Rod while the alternative weekly newspaper said it obtained records detailing purchases by Rodriguez, 2012 All-Star game MVP Melky Cabrera, 2005 AL Cy Young Award winner Bartolo Colon, and 2011 AL championship series MVP Nelson Cruz of Texas.

Bosch’s lawyer, Susy Ribero-Ayala, said in a statement that Mr. Bosch vehemently denies the assertions that MLB players such as Alex Rodriguez and Gio Gonzalez were treated by or associated with him and the New Times report “is filled with inaccuracies, innuendo and misstatements of fact.”

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Wednesday 16, Mar 2011

  Conte says Jones injected drugs in front of me

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Conte says Jones injected drugs in front of meVictor Conte, the founder of the designer drugs pharmacy BALCO, has revealed that Marion Jones, the greatest female athlete of her generation, was provided with insulin, growth hormone, EPO, and ‘The Clear’ (users’ slang for THG) as well as nutritional supplements.

Conte also said Jones was on a cocktail of drugs including insulin, growth hormone, EPO, and THG when she won three gold medals and two bronze at the Sydney Olympics.

Conte also said, “Soon I was working with their (Jones and Montgomery’s) rivals,” he says. It is here that Dwain Chambers, of Great Britain, enters the story, another who, despite being banned, continues to profess his innocence. Conte says he gave Chambers “the full enchilada”: ‘The Clear,’ insulin, EPO, growth hormone, modafinil and a testosterone cream.

Monday 03, Jan 2011

  Steroid use has links with Panthers stars

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Steroid use has links with Panthers starsDr James Shortt, an alternative practitioner under investigation by government and state officials, who has been accused of writing steroid prescriptions for three players of Carolina Panthers, has denied any wrongdoings.

The doctor defended himself in an edition of The Charlotte Observer.

The doctor refused to name any of his patients in the interview with the Charlotte Observer.

Friday 26, Dec 2008

  NASCAR will welcome 2009 with tougher dope testing

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nascar-steroidsAccording to AP report, NASCAR is likely to start testing drivers by the third week of January under anti-doping policy.

NASCAR is implementing tougher policy for use of anabolic steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs. Said policy also applies to illegal drugs and abuse of prescription medications.

Crew members, meanwhile, are required to submit results from an approved lab by Jan.16. A memo was sent to teams enumerating the prohibited compounds for which crew members must be tested. No specific guidelines were provided for drivers as NASCAR reserves the right to screen drivers for any compounds. However, according to a NASCAR’s spokesman, drivers will definitely be screened for performance-enhancing drugs.

The tougher policy was adopted partly because of former Truck Series driver Aaron Fike’s public admission that he had used heroin even on days he raced. Veteran drivers like Tony Stewart and Kevin Harvick urged the association to strengthen its policy regarding the use of banned compounds.

In September this year, Ron Hornaday Jr admitted he used a testosterone cream during the 2004 and 2005 to treat a medical condition. Hornaday is suffering from Graves’ disease, a thyroid disorder characterized by goiter and exophthalmos (bulging of the eyes).

The memo, dated Dec. 8, is the first time the new policy has been laid out in writing and specifies who falls under the guidelines. Those who must be tested before Jan. 16 include: pit crew members, including “over-the-wall” crew members, the crew chief, car chief, team members responsible for tires, fuel and pit crew operation, spotters and race-day support personnel that includes engineers, engine tuners, shock specialists, chassis specialists and tire specialists.

Among the substances those participants must be tested for are:

_ Seven different amphetamines, including methamphetamine and PMA, a synthetic psychostimulant and hallucinogen.

_ Three drugs classified under ephedrine.

_ 13 different narcotics, including codeine and morphine.

_ Ten different benzodiazepines and barbituates.

_ Marijuana, cocaine, zolpidem, nitrites, chromates and drugs that can increase specific gravity.

Under the old policy, NASCAR only implemented random test based on suspicion of abuse. Under the new guidelines everyone will be tested before the season begins, and random testing will continue throughout the year. NASCAR expects to randomly test 12 to 14 individuals per series each weekend in 2009.

Sunday 14, Sep 2008

  Failed steroid test prompts NASCAR to adopt stricter drug testing policy

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On the heels of the steroid controversy involving Craftsman Truck Series champ Ron Hornaday, NASCAR says it is ready to come up with a new drug policy and this time around the organization would like every car owner and driver to have a say in the matter.

The announcement was made during the media conference on Friday at New Hampshire Speedway.

Hornaday apparently tested for an anabolic steroids in the form of testosterone cream but he denied he used the banned compound to enhance his performance in the track. Hornaday said he used the substance during the 2004 and 2005 seasons to treat a ‘mysterious illness’, which doctors had difficulty diagnosing at that time. It turned out the illness was Graves’ disease, a thyroid disorder characterized by goiter and ‘orange peel’ skin, which up to now Hornaday receives treatment for.

NASCAR’s current policy may be described as overly lenient – there are no random or scheduled screenings for drivers. It is only on grounds of reasonable suspicion that officials conduct testing for illicit compounds.

Dale Earnhardt Jr. sympathized with Hornaday, but he hopes a stringent anti-doping program will be implemented at NASCAR.

“I hope we get a strict consistent policy,” Earnhardt said Friday at New Hampshire Motor Speedway. “I would like to have drug testing every two weeks or something like that.  That would be awesome.”

“I want to catch somebody who is fooling around,” Earnhardt said. “I don’t want to be a jerk about it but I don’t want it anywhere around me. I don’t want to be involved in a race with anyone that’s not playing by the rules and not making good judgment decisions.I don’t really see anything right now that gives me reasonable suspicion and I didn’t before and then Ron comes out with his deal so maybe we need more than reasonable suspicion.”