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Wednesday 24, Oct 2012

  Track And Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Track and field athlete accepts sanction

Matthew DiBuono, of New Rochelle, N.Y., an athlete in the sport of track and field, has tested positive for prohibited substances in multiple samples, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 24-year-old DiBuono accepted a suspension for his doping offense. The offense pertains to a sample provided by the athlete at the 2011 USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships in Eugene, Oregon that resulted in adverse analytical finding for the administration of synthetic steroids.

During an out-of-competition test on August 4, 2011, a subsequent sample collected from DiBuono resulted in an adverse analytical finding for the presence of metabolites of the steroid, stanozolol. Both the tests reflected the presence of anabolic agents that are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the rules of the International Association of Athletic Federations, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”) and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List.

This case was an “aggravating circumstances” case, under the rules of the Code and this allowed the USADA to increase the standard two-year period of ineligibility to the maximum under the Code of a four-year period of ineligibility. In the case, those circumstances included the use of multiple prohibited substances on multiple occasions.

A four-year period of ineligibility was accepted by DiBuono and it began on August 17, 2011, the day he accepted a provisional sanction. DiBuono is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to June 23, 2011, the day the first sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the violation.

The former Fordham Male Student-Athlete of the Year qualified for the 2011 U.S. Outdoor Track & Field National Championship and holds the Fordham school record in the hammer throw at 214′ 4″, competed for Shore AC at a meet held at West Point on June 1st, recording a mark of 76.60 meters or 251′ 4″ in the hammer throw. This distance surpassed the U.S. “A” Standard qualifying mark of 69.00 meters or 226′ 4″ for U.S. Nationals to make him the first former Fordham athlete to make the National Championship since Lauren Gubicza did in the early 1990s. His mark of 251′ 4″ is the second-best mark by any U.S. competitor this year, behind only Kibwé Johnson of the New York Athletic Club (NYAC) at 262′ 9″ (80.09 meters) that was set in Uberlándia, Brazil on May 18th, 2011.

 The mark also ranks him currently 14th in the world, based on the current listing on HammerThrow.eu. He was a three-time Atlantic 10 champion in the hammer throw, a two-time Athlete of the Meet at the Metropolitan Championship, and the 2009 Vincent T. Lombardi Award winner as Male Student-Athlete of the Year. His throw of 239’ – 8” in Eugene, Oregon with the 16 pound hammer placed him third and officially earned him a spot on the USA National Team which will compete at the Track and Field World Championships in Daegu, South Korea.

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Saturday 20, Oct 2012

  Paralympic Track And Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Paralympic track and field athlete accepts sanction

Matthew Brown of Idalou, Texas, an athlete in the sport of Paralympic track and field, has tested positive for a prohibited substance, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 35-year-old accepted a suspension for his doping offense after testing positive for tetrahydrocannabinol acid, a marijuana metabolite in the class of Cannabinoids, in a sample collected on June 17, 2011 at the 2011 U.S. Paralympic Track & Field National Championships in Miramar.

Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) anti-doping rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the WADA Prohibited List, cannabinoids are prohibited and listed as Specified Substances as they can be susceptible to a credible non-doping explanation, and therefore use of those substances can result in a reduced sanction. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said in cases involving marijuana there could be a “credible non-doping explanation.”

A three-month period of ineligibility was accepted by Brown that began on July 12, 2011, the day he accepted the sanction. The ineligibility period was suspended and reduced to time served, upon his successful completion of a USADA anti-doping educational program, which he completed on July 14, 2011.

Brown has been disqualified from all competitive results achieved at the 2011 U.S. Paralympic Track & Field Championships, where his sample was collected, through and including the date the doping education program was completed, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the doping violation.

The former Wildcats standout and current Wildcats assistant coach earned a spot on the U.S. Paralympic track and field team. Brown finished first in the discus and second in the shot put at the U.S. National Championships in Atlanta. Matthew Brown competes with a prosthetic left leg after a pipeline explosion some years ago severed his leg below the knee while working on a gas well in Fort Worth. Brown returned to Idalou after the accident and the former Class 2A state discus champion soon began working as a volunteer coach for the Wildcats shot put and discus throwers. Matthew Brown quickly became one of the top Paralympic throwers in the country as he showed at the national championships and set North American and South American records in both the discus (143-6) and the shot put (41-9).

Brown won a gold medal in discus and a bronze in the shot put at the 2007 Parapan American Games and finished fourth in the men’s discus F42 when he made his first Paralympic Games appearance in Beijing. Brown played college football for two years and was an All-American in track and field and graduated from Wayland Baptist University (Plainview, Texas) with a degree in education. He was an All-State tight end in football, an All-District center in basketball and a two-time state champion in shot put/discus. Some of his major achievements included 2011 Gold medal in discus (F42), gold in discus at the 2007 Parapan American Games, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and a bronze in shot put at the 2007 Parapan American Games, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Paralympic Track and Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Friday 19, Oct 2012

  Kathy Jager Accepts Sanction

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Kathy jager accepts sanction

Kathy Jager of Glendale, Arizona, an athlete in the sport of track and field, has tested positive for a prohibited substance, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 68-year-old Jager accepted a two-year period of ineligibility, which began on September 26, 2011, the day she accepted a provisional suspension. The laboratory analysis of a sample provided by the track and field athlete at the 2011 USA Masters Track & Field Championships, on July 29, 2011, in Berea, Ohio, resulted in an Adverse Analytical Finding for an anabolic agent.

Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the rules of the International Association of Athletics Federations, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, anabolic androgenic Steroids are prohibited. The doping offense involved the use of a prescribed medication under the care of a physician but without seeking a therapeutic use exemption first as required by the applicable rules.

Kathy Jager is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to July 28, 2011, which is the date on which the USA Masters Track & Field Championships, the event at which her sample was collected, began, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the sanction.

In 1999, Jager was the toast of the Gateshead WAVA meet after she won a fistful of sprint medals and maintained her dignity despite accusations that she was a male. Jager learned in 2007 that her second-largest coronary artery was 95 percent collapsed and she quickly returned to competition at the 2007 USA Masters Outdoor Track & Field Championships in Orono.

Jager insisted that she was not taking steroid-filled syringes into veins and was innocent and claimed that her only crime was to follow orders of a doctor and using a little green hormone replacement pill that quelled her post-menopausal hot flashes. Jager was banned for testing positive for methyltestosterone at the 1999 World Association of Veteran Athletes World Championships in Gateshead (Great Britain) where she had broken world records in running of 100 meters. It is believed that this time she took EstraTest HS that contained esterified estrogens and methyltestosterone in a single pill. EstraTest HS contained 1.25 milligrams of methyltestosterone and is used for treating menopausal women who experience hot flashes that were not relieved by estrogen-only HRT. Solvay, the manufacturer of EstraTest, discontinued the production of this product in March 1999 and HRT protocol details about use by Jager were not provided.

 The first ban for Jager occurred prior to the founding of WADA. After her first ban, Jager stopped using the doctor-prescribed treatment for menopausal symptoms and resorted to over-the-counter herbal remedies to comply with the ban on methyltestosterone.

Jager said he has never and will never take medications for enhancing performance and remarked that she trains hard and takes pride in her honestly earned accomplishments. Kathy Jager would possibly make a comeback in 2013 just as she did in 2001 after serving a suspension of two years.

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Sunday 30, Sep 2012

  Arbitrator Upholds Sanction for U.S. Track & Field Athlete

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Arbitrator Upholds Sanction for U.S. Track & Field Athlete

An independent American Arbitration Association (AAA) arbitrator has issued a decision upholding the suspension for two years of Mark Jelks, of Kansas City, Kan., an athlete in the sport of Track & Field, for committing an anti-doping rule violation, according to an announcement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 28-year-old Jelks is a member of the USADA Registered Testing Pool that consists of a select group of athletes subject to certain whereabouts requirements in order to be located for USADA Out-of-Competition testing. The athlete failed to comply with the whereabouts requirements and, as a result, accrued three Whereabouts Failures within a period of 18 months. The combination of three Whereabouts Failures within an 18-month period constitutes an anti-doping rules violation under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (“Code”).

A Whereabouts Failure includes failure to offer required quarterly whereabouts filings (Filing Failure) and failure to be available for testing during a 60-minute window designated by the athlete (Missed Test). Mark Jelks accrued two filing failures and one missed test within a period of 18 months.

Jelks was sanctioned with a two-year period of ineligibility in 2010 after he failed to respond to numerous communications from USADA concerning his violation of anti-doping rules. The athlete contacted USADA in December 2011 and made a request for a reduction in his ineligibility period. The anti-doping agency declined to unilaterally reduce ineligibility period of the athlete but agreed to have the matter heard by an AAA arbitrator because of the unique circumstances of his case. The hearing started on April 18, 2012 and was declared closed on April 30, 2012. A decision was issued by the arbitrator on May 25, 2012 that denied the request made by Jelks for a reduction in his period of ineligibility and the two-year period of ineligibility for Jelks completed on August 22, 2012.

Athletes, including Jelks, are required to complete the Athlete’s Advantage online tutorial of USADA before being enrolled in the USADA registered testing pool that explains to athletes in detail their responsibilities as members of the Pool, including their obligations to comply with the whereabouts requirements. Jelks received a two-year period of ineligibility that began on August 23, 2010, consistent with the code, and the athlete was disqualified from all competitive results achieved on and subsequent to April 18, 2010, the date of his last Whereabouts Failure, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

Born on April 10, 1984, the American track and field athlete specializes in the 100-meter dash and has a personal best of 9.99 seconds for the event and represented the United States at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics. Jelks competed in the 60-meter dash and won the national title at the 2009 USA Indoor Track and Field Championships with a personal record of 6.51 seconds. He broke the 10-second barrier for the first time at the 2008 United States Olympic Trials and started the 2010 indoor season in top form by winning the 60 m in Düsseldorf with a time of 6.56 seconds.

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Wednesday 28, Dec 2011

  Suspension for Kathy Jager

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Kathy Jager has been suspended for a period of two years by USADA after testing positive for anabolic steroids at the masters track and field championships.

The 68-year-old Jager’s positive test occurred on July 29 at the event in Berea, Ohio, as per the USADA.

The positive test has once again highlighted the deep-rooted relationship between sportsmen and anabolic steroids.

Thursday 15, Sep 2011

  Doping rumored among older athletes

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Mary Harada, the speedy septuagenarian, would like to believe her fellow masters track and field competitors would never take anything stronger than, say, Ensure or Metamucil to boost their performance.

Harada has heard the gossip at every meet she attends.

“The age and medical conditions that are encountered in masters athletes do raise some unique considerations,” said Stan Perkins, WMA president. ” … Where appropriate, amendments to our testing procedures can be considered.”

Wednesday 25, Mar 2009

  JUSTIN GATLIN PREPARES FOR HIS COME BACK IN 2010

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JUSTIN GATLIN PREPARES FOR HIS COME BACK IN 2010Steroids use has become widespread in athletics when almost every sport seem to produce a player positive for performance enhancing drugs. After baseball, wrestling, cycling, football, now comes Justin Gatlin from track in field. Reports of his involvement with the banned substance is not anything new because he is serving his four year ban for testing positive for steroids. He is now preparing to continue on with his career next year after the ban is lifted.

Gatlin said that in 2006 he was tested positive without knowing that prior to the testing the cream that a masseuse had used on him contained steroids. Trevor Graham made this statement and this was corroborated by Gatlin.

However, there are still those in the tracks that doubt his claims. Gatlin has to go back to the top and prove that he isn’t cheating once he is reinstated in 2010. But all of these will be happening under the watchful eye of USADA.