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Tuesday 16, Feb 2010

  Inhaled corticosteroids provide more benefits than cromolyn for asthma patients

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Inhaled corticosteroids provide more benefits than cromolyn for asthma patientsA review of studies that were aimed at making comparisons between two asthma treatment options: inhaled corticosteroids and cromolyn has found that asthmatic patients, both adults and children, can exercise a better control and breathe deeper while being on corticosteroids.

James Guevara, M.D., of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and colleagues found out that patients administered with corticosteroids make lesser use of life-saving “inhalers” than their counterparts on cromolyn and even scored better on lung function tests.

Guevara and colleagues noted that the benefits and superiority of inhaled corticosteroids are more than that of cromolyn, irrespective of the severity level of asthma. It was also noted that the results were so decisive that there is absolutely no further need to warrant any more studies to make similar comparisons.

Thursday 04, Feb 2010

  Trials in line for potential asthma drug

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Trials in line for potential asthma drugRPL554, a potential drug for providing relief to patients suffering from asthma is undergoing human trials in the near future after it successfully cleared trials on more than 60 people in the year 2008 at the Centre for Human Drug Research (CHDR) in the Netherlands.

The drug is believed to offer a crucial insight to medical practitioners across the globe to treat asthmatic patients. This potential drug for asthma is expected to reach the market in the next 3-5 years after successful completion of initial trials for safety and efficacy.

Some practitioners are of the view that this drug will help them to draw new and improved treatment plans for treating their asthmatic patients.

Saturday 28, Nov 2009

  Inhaled corticosteroids can treat symptoms of asthma

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Inhaled corticosteroids can treat symptoms of asthmaAsthmatic children and adults can exercise a better control over asthma and breathe deeper, as per a new review of recently concluded studies comparing inhaled corticosteroids and the medicine cromolyn.

James Guevara, M.D., of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and colleagues were of the view that patients suffering from asthma and treated with steroids enjoy an advantage of scoring higher in lung function tests. It was remarked that the use of inhaled corticosteroids help asthmatic patients to make lesser use of inhalers than patients who makes use of cromolyn.

Guevara and colleagues further remarked that inhaled corticosteroids are any day better than cromolyn irrespective of the severity level of asthma and said that the obtained results are so decisive that there is need to warrant any further studies on this matter.

 


Wednesday 18, Nov 2009

  New Asthma Drug heading for Human Trials

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New Asthma Drug heading for Human TrialsRPL554, a new drug for treating asthma, that faced trial at the Centre for Human Drug Research (CHDR) in the Netherlands on more than 60 people in 2008, is now expected to head for human trials during 2009.

The drug, which is hailed by some as nothing short of a miracle drug, may prove beneficial to 1.5 million people in the United States alone suffering from asthma and hay fever. This drug is expected to be available in the market in the coming three to four years pending to the success of initial trials for efficacy and safety.

Some researchers are of the view that this once-a-day asthma treatment option would act as a potential first-line therapy for curing patients suffering from asthma and hay fever. This will also mean that patients with asthma would now require only a single needle puff from their “lifesaving” inhalers to stop the symptoms.

Wednesday 14, Oct 2009

  New drug for asthma treatment heads for human trials

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New drug for asthma treatment heads for human trialsA new drug, RPL554, which faced trial at the Centre for Human Drug Research (CHDR) in the Netherlands on as many as 60 people in 2008, is expected to be completed by the summer of 2009.

This drug is aimed at treating asthma, which affects more than 1.5 million people in the United States alone, and hay fever. It is believed that the drug could be made available in approximately three to four years if the initial trials for safety and efficacy are found to be successful.

 

It is considered by many researchers that this once-a-day treatment option will be regarded as a potential breakthrough when it comes to treating asthma and hay fever. The treatment option would bring relief to asthma sufferers and its use would mean that asthmatic people would be requiring only a single needle puff from their “lifesaving” inhalers to stop the symptoms.

Wednesday 10, Jun 2009

  Cells mediating steroid-resistance Asthma identified

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Cells mediating steroid-resistance Asthma identifiedChildren’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC researchers have claimed to identify cells that are likely to play an important role in some forms of steroid-resistant asthma, which is a complication that has the effect of making treatment more challenging.

Jay K. Kolls, MD, chief of the Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, Allergy and Immunology at Children’s Hospital and study’s senior author, remarked that the identification of T Helper Type 17 (Th17), a lineage of cells, can help scientists to develop new forms of treatment to control asthma in an effective manner. These findings are likely to benefit more than 11 million of Americans who have been diagnosed with steroid-resistant asthma.

The findings have been seen as positive steps in finding a potential new target for development of drugs that can finally lead to effective asthma control and management. It is believed that these latest findings have the potential to change the methods of treating steroid-resistant asthma in a better way.