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Friday 03, Mar 2017

  Team Sky Has No Record Of Medication Of Cyclists

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A scathing attack was launched on British Cycling, Team Sky, and their doctor Richard Freeman by UK Anti-Doping boss Nicole Sapstead for failing to keep proper records of drugs given to riders in their care.

Sapstead made an appearance before the Culture, Media and Sport (CMS) select committee that is investigating allegations of wrongdoing in British cycling since September. The committee received information about a package delivered to Team Sky doctor Freeman for star rider Bradley Wiggins at the end of the Criterium du Dauphine race in June 2011. Sapstead remarked 34 current and former riders and staff members at British Cycling and Team Sky have been interviewed by UK Anti-Doping.

In a shocking revelation, the UK Anti-Doping boss remarked her organization is still unaware whether the legal decongestant Fluimucil was in the package as claimed by Freeman. It is alleged that the packed contained the banned corticosteroid Triamcinolone. Sapstead said we are not able to confirm or refute that it contained Fluimucil and also said we have asked for inventories and medical records and we have not been able to ascertain that because there are no records.

Sapstead said Freeman is unable to produce any evidence that he gave what was an unlicensed product in the UK to Wiggins, as he is obliged to do under correct medical practice as there are simply no records. Sapstead also added that Freeman medical records on a laptop and he was meant, according to Team Sky policy, to upload those records to a dropbox that the other team doctors had access to and also commented but Freeman did not do that and his laptop was stolen in 2014 when he was on holiday in Greece. Sapstead also said Freeman, who was effectively working for both British Cycling and its road racing off-shoot Team Sky, ordered and stored medicines for riders at Manchester headquarters of the governing body and there was no clear separation between which drug was for which outfit.

Freeman was scheduled to appear before the committee but told chairman Damian Collins MP he was too ill to attend.

Sapstead went on to remark that there is simply no record of Fluimucil being ordered by Freeman though there are invoices for Kenalog, a brand name for Triamcinolone. Britain’s most decorated Olympian Bradley Wiggins controversially received therapeutic use exemption (TUE) to use Triamcinolone before his three most important races in 2011, 2012 and 2013, including his 2012 Tour de France victory. The UK Anti-Doping boss also remarked the British Cycling medical store held a significant amount of Kenalog that suggested the drug was being used by more than one rider but access to every rider’s medical files would be required before coming out with a statement.

Sapstead also said he could not “confirm or deny” if Bradley Wiggins was actually given Triamcinolone on the final day of the Dauphine that would have resulted in an anti-doping rule violation because he did not have a TUE to use it in that race because of the missing records of Freeman.

Wiggins had claimed that he required the drug for preventing a flare-up of pollen-related breathing problems that is associated with his history of asthma.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Team Sky Has No Record Of Medication Of Cyclists

Tuesday 27, Sep 2016

  Drug Exemption Of Wiggins Defended By Team Sky Boss

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Team Sky boss Dave Brailsford has defended the decision to obtain special permission for Bradley Wiggins to receive injections of Triamcinolone, a banned drug before three major races, including his historic win in the 2012 Tour de France.

Brailsford reiterated his belief that Team Sky had done nothing wrong. The Team Sky boss denied that this was remotely similar to the doping so prevalent in the sport a decade ago. Brailsford commented what we’re talking about here is Bradley having a need, the team doctor supporting that, an expert giving their opinion that this is the medicine that is required, and that then going to the authorities who say that we agree with you, and here is the certificate that gives you the permission to use that medication.

Brailsford added he has got trust in the therapeutic use exemption process and the integrity of that process. The chief of Team Sky added it is not one person making that decision and further remarked it is not the rider or the team doctor, who is picking the medication as they have to seek permission to use it and they were granted permission. The 52-year-old added the brilliant team of doctors of Team Sky has a duty to help the riders be as healthy as they can be, and the riders are supported in every aspect of their performance. The Team Sky boss rejected any comparisons with former dopers and remarked certain dopers, who cheated with a cocktail of drugs, claim they used this and abused it for performance enhancement and that is not the case here.

Brailsford went on to defend reputation of his team by remarking one-hundred per cent you can trust in Sky, absolutely 100 percent and also added this is the very essence of why we created this team in the first place. Brailsford added this sport had a difficult time in the past and the whole reason for creating the team was so that young guys leaving (Manchester’s National Cycling Centre) could go and you’d know they would never be pressurized to cheat.

A group of Russian computer hackers recently leaked medical records of several athletes including Wiggins. It was disclosed Bradley Wiggins used the powerful anti-inflammatory drug on the eve of the 2011 and 2012 Tours and 2013 Giro d’Italia. The 36-year-old British star applied was granted three therapeutic use exemptions (TUEs) to take Triamcinolone to deal with a pollen allergy that aggravates his long-standing asthma condition. The TUEs of Wiggins were approved by the UCI, the world governing body of cycling, and there is no suggestion that he or the team have broken any rules.

However, Triamcinolone is widely used as a doping agent and has the potential of assisting athletes to lose weight, fight fatigue, and aid recovery.

Wiggins, who last month in Rio became Team GB’s most decorated Olympian with his eighth medal, said he was not seeking an “unfair advantage” but was trying to level the playing field so he could perform at the highest level.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Drug Exemption Of Wiggins Defended By Team Sky Boss

Monday 19, Sep 2016

  Tour De France Winner Denies Link To Doctor Convicted Of Doping

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Bradley Wiggins, the first British man to win the Tour de France, is facing a fight for his reputation after recently-leaked documents showed he used banned performance enhancing drugs.

Wiggins used Triamcinolone, the same drug Lance Armstrong tested positive for at the 1999 Tour de France.

Wiggins has been forced to deny that the controversial Belgian doctor Geert Leinders was involved in his obtaining so-called therapeutic use exemptions. This was after details of the therapeutic use exemptions granted to him and fellow Tour de France winner, Chris Froome, were leaked.

The leaked documents suggested three TUEs were obtained by Bradley Wiggins for the treatment of asthma and allergies between 2011 and 2013, each before his major target race for that season. The British cyclist also had to clarify apparent inconsistencies between what he wrote in 2012 about the use of needles and the details that have emerged via the Fancy Bears hackers.

In a statement, a spokesperson for Wiggins said Brad has no direct link to Geert Leinders. The spokesperson added Leinders was ‘on race’ doctor for Team Sky for short period and so was occasionally present at races dealing with injuries sustained whilst racing such as colds, bruises etc. It was further commented by the spokesperson of Wiggins that Leinders had no part in Brad’s TUE application and added Brad’s medical assessments from 2011-2015 were processed by the official Team Sky doctor, and were verified by independent specialists to follow WADA, UCI, and BC guidelines. The statement also reads Brad’s passing comment regarding needles in the 2012 book referred to the historic and illegal practice of intravenous injections of performance-enhancing substances, which was the subject of a law change by [world cycling’s governing body] the UCI in 2011. It was also commented that the Triamcinolone injection that is referred to in the Wada leaks is an intramuscular treatment for asthma and is fully approved by the sport’s governing bodies and Brad stands by his comment concerning the use of illegal intravenous needle injections.

Belgian doctor Geert Leinders was a Team Sky doctor between 2011-2012 and Bradley won the Tour de France in the latter year. Leinders was later banned for life for doping offences committed during a previous stint at the tainted Rabobank cycling team between 2001-2009.

David Walsh, the Sunday Times journalist who brought down Lance Armstrong, suggested that a 2012 injection of Triamcinolone was given as a preventive measure rather than to treat existing symptoms ahead of Wiggins’s historic Tour victory. The journalist said the team that wanted to be seen as whiter than white had been dealing in shades of grey and added what they did was legal, but it was not right.

The British professional road and track racing cyclist, who rides for the UCI Continental team WIGGINS and was awarded a CBE in 2009, won the Paris–Nice, the Tour de Romandie, the Critérium du Dauphiné, and became the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France and the time trial at the Olympic Games in 2012.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Tour De France Winner Denies Link To Doctor Convicted Of Doping

Monday 16, Aug 2010

  Diabetic complications can be treated with injectable steroids

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Diabetic complications can be treated with injectable steroidsProgression of a complication of diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, could be slowed down by injecting Triamcinolone (corticosteroid) directly into the eye, as per a study.

This finding was disclosed after a study was conducted by Neil M. Bressler, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network conducted and involved 840 eyes of 693 participants having macular edema.

The finding appeared in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Thursday 29, Jul 2010

  Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with steroids

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Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with steroidsTriamcinolone, a corticosteroid (steroid) when administered in injectable form, could be highly useful to slow down the progression of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, which is a complication of diabetes leading to vision loss or blindness.

Treatment based on steroids cannot be routinely recommended at this point of time because of safety issues despite of the fact that steroids work, according to Neil M. Bressler, the James P. Gills Professor of Ophthalmology and chief of the Retina Division of the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, chair of the government-sponsored Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network.

The finding was revealed in a study by researchers led by specialists at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute and this study was published in an issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Wednesday 26, May 2010

  Diabetic retinopathy can be slowed down by steroid injections

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Diabetic retinopathy can be slowed down by steroid injectionsPatients suffering from diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that can cause vision loss and blindness, can finally have some relief coming their way.

According to a report in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, injecting triamcinolone (corticosteroid) directly into the eye can slow down the disease progression.

This finding was disclosed by Neil M. Bressler, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network.

Friday 16, Apr 2010

  Steroid injections helpful for slowing down diabetes-related complications

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Steroid injections helpful for slowing down diabetes-related complicationsAccording to findings reported in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, injecting triamcinolone directly into the human eye has the ability to considerably slow down the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is a condition in which new blood vessels are formed on the optic disc or another retina component.

This study was conducted by Neil M. Bressler, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network and involved 840 eyes of 693 participants having macular edema.

Saturday 13, Feb 2010

  Injectable steroids may do the trick for slowing down diabetes-related complications

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Injectable steroids may do the trick for slowing down diabetes-related complicationsProgression of diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that can result in loss of vision and blindness, can be delayed by injecting triamcinolone, the corticosteroid, directly into the eye.

The finding appeared in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Neil M. Bressler, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network conducted the study that involved 840 eyes of 693 participants having macular edema.

Friday 29, Jan 2010

  Diabetes-related disease can be slowed down with steroid injections

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Diabetes-related disease can be slowed down with steroid injectionsInjecting triamcinolone, the corticosteroid, directly into the eye can possibly slow down the progression of diabetic retinopathy, which is a complication of diabetes that may result in vision loss and blindness.

This finding was presented in a report in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is a complication that occurs when new blood vessels form on the optic disc or another retina component.

The study was conducted by Neil M. Bressler, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network conducted a study involving 840 eyes of 693 participants having macular edema.

Wednesday 20, Jan 2010

  Steroids not better than DME for laser treatments

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steroids-not-better-than-dmeInjecting a corticosteroid, triamcinolone, directly into the eye can slowdown the progression of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that frequently leads to blindness.

This finding was revealed by a team of researchers led by specialists at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute.

It was however noted by the study authors that steroid use in the eye may raise the risks of glaucoma and cataract and laser photo-coagulation remains the treatment of choice till the time a new treatment option is formulated that can reproduce the positive effects of steroids without the associated risks of such use.

Neil M. Bressler, the James P. Gills Professor of Ophthalmology and chief of the Retina Division of the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, chair of the government-sponsored Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network, remarked that though steroid treatment works, it cannot be recommended on a routinely basis due to the safety issues.

 

 

 


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