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Thursday 10, Feb 2011

  Infliximab helps Ulcerative Colitis Patients

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Infliximab helps Ulcerative Colitis PatientsAccording to a review of more than 600 patients enrolled in two pivotal studies, patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis treated with infliximab had their colectomy rate cut by more than a third during the first year of treatment, compared with control patients.

Dr. Brian G. Feagan at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology said, “These are unique data that show we can alter the natural history of the disease.”

From Internalmedicinenews.com:

“It seems like infliximab may alter the natural course of UC by reducing the need for colectomy,” commented Dr. Miguel D. Regueiro, codirector of the inflammatory bowel disease center at the University of Pittsburgh. Physicians and patients will need to decide whether the risks and complications of colectomy are high or low compared with biologic therapy, and whether quality of life is better with colectomy or biologic therapy, he said.

UC patients “in remission with their colon have a better quality of life” than patients who undergo colectomy, commented Dr. Stephen B. Hanauer, professor of medicine and chief of gastroenterology at the University of Chicago. “Chronically sick patients benefit from cholectomy, but the goal of treatment is to get patients in remission and off steroids. Biologic treatments can do this,” he said in an interview.

The new analysis used data collected in the Active Ulcerative Colitis Trials 1 and 2 (ACT 1 and ACT 2), which together compared two dosages of infliximab (either 5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg) with placebo in two different protocols that treated patients for as long as 54 weeks. The primary finding was that patients treated with either dosage were more likely than placebo patients to have a clinical response after 8, 30, and 54 weeks of treatment (N. Engl. J. Med. 2005;353:2462–76). This led to Food and Drug Administration approval of infliximab (Remicade) for treating moderately to severely active UC.

The ACT 1 and 2 studies were sponsored by Centocor Inc. that markets infliximab in the United States, and by Schering-Plough that markets the drug in all other countries.

Wednesday 02, Feb 2011

  Infliximab effective in treating active Ulcerative Colitis

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Infliximab effective in treating active Ulcerative ColitisAccording to results of two multicenter phase III trials reported at the annual Digestive Disease Week, active ulcerative colitis responds to the drug infliximab.

Both studies showed that Infliximab is also effective in inducing remission and leads to mucosal healing in patients with active ulcerative colitis.

From Internalmedicinenews.com:

Both ACT 1 and 2 trials had similar results and patient populations, according to Dr. Sandborn, whose institution was one of 55 study centers. He described subjects as outpatients with relatively stable disease.

At enrollment, ACT 1 patients had not responded to treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive therapy, whereas patients in ACT 2 had experienced treatment failure with 5-aminosalicylates, steroids, and/or immunosuppressives. The duration of ACT 1 also was longer (54 vs. 30 weeks).

Clinical response was defined as a decrease in the Mayo score of at least 30% and 3 or more points, plus either a reduction of 1 or more points in the rectal bleeding score or a score of 0 or 1 at week 8.

In addition to clinical response, both trials studied clinical remission—a Mayo score of 2 or less, with no individual subscores greater than 1—and mucosal healing, characterized as an endoscopy subscore of 0 or 1.

William Sandborn, M.D., principal investigator of ACT 2 and head of the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine‘s irritable bowel disease interest group and clinical research unit, said, “This is very encouraging news for a patient population that has few treatment options.”

Monday 12, Jul 2010

  Steroids better than Remicade for Ulcerative Colitis

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Steroids better than Remicade for Ulcerative ColitisAbbott/Eisai’s Humira will earn Gold Standard Status for Ulcerative Colitis in 2012, according to a new report from Decision Resources, which is one of the leading research and advisory firms worldwide for pharmaceutical and healthcare concerns.

It was disclosed during clinical data and relevant studies that corticosteroids are superior to Remicade; this finding is expected to be a critical attribute for influencing researchers’ decisions in moderate to severe ulcerative colitis.

Some experts are of the view that these findings will be helpful in bringing importance to steroids in the world of medicines and health ailments.

Wednesday 23, Jun 2010

  Ulcerative Colitis patients are better treated with Corticosteroids

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Ulcerative Colitis patients are better treated with CorticosteroidsAbbott/Eisai’s Humira will be earning Gold Standard Status for Ulcerative Colitis in 2012, as per a new report from Decision Resources, one of the leading research and advisory firms worldwide for pharmaceutical and healthcare issues.

Decision Resources found that gastroenterologists were able to ascertain therapy effects on induction of remission, which has implications for researchers in moderation to severe ulcerative colitis.

It was remarked by Decision Resources Analyst Benjamin Guikema, Ph.D. that adalimumab is superior to infliximab in maintenance setting. The study revealed that corticosteroids have an advantage over Remicade for treating ulcerative colitis patients, suggesting role of steroids for good health.

Saturday 05, Jun 2010

  Stubborn Ulcerative Colitis can be treated with arthritis drug

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Stubborn Ulcerative Colitis can be treated with arthritis drugInfliximab, a drug presently used for treating patients suffering with rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn’s diseases, can also be used to treat patients with stubborn cases of ulcerative colitis, a serious intestinal disorder.

It was remarked by review co-author Dr. Anthony Kwaku Akobeng that people with active ulcerative colitis and not responding to corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents can be helped by infliximab as the drug can induce clinical response to promote mucosal healing and reducing need for colectomy, at least in the short term.

The review of studies appeared in an issue of The Cochrane Library, a publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, which is an international organization that evaluates medical research.

Tuesday 27, Apr 2010

  Ulcerative colitis patients may find relief with new, promising treatment

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ulcerative-colitis-patients-may-find-relief-with-new-promising-treatmentA promising new therapy pioneered by University of Kentucky gastroenterology specialists may provide significant relief to people with the chronic disease ulcerative colitis that can limit life to few social functions and trips away from home.

Ulcerative colitis brings inflammation and ulcers in the colon and leads to abdominal pain and such frequent trips to the toilet. Some of the presently available treatment options for this complication are steroids, surgery, or anti-inflammatory drugs.

Willem J.S. deVilliers, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the UK Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, said that this is a very welcome addition to the treatment options.

Thursday 01, Apr 2010

  Corticosteroids superior to Remicade for stimulating remission

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Corticosteroids superior to Remicade for stimulating remissionAbbott/Eisai’s Humira would be earning Gold Standard Status for Ulcerative Colitis in 2012 as per a new Report from Decision Resources, one of the leading research and advisory firms in the world for pharmaceutical and healthcare issues.

Decision Resources disclosed that gastroenterologists have been able to find out the effect of a therapy on remission induction, which is a critical attribute to influence researchers’ decision in moderation to severe ulcerative colitis.

It was remarked by Decision Resources Analyst Benjamin Guikema, Ph.D. that adalimumab is believed to be more effective than infliximab in terms of maintenance setting besides having a reduced risk of prominent organ toxicity. The finding is believed to add one more “feather” to benefits of steroids.

Thursday 04, Mar 2010

  Hypnotherapy effective for boosting quality of life

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Hypnotherapy effective for boosting quality of lifeHypnotherapy has been found to be an effective form of treatment when it comes to boosting quality of life of patients suffering from Ulcerative Colitis (UV).

Keefer, who is director of the Center for Psychosocial Research in Intestinal Bowel Disease at Northwestern’s Feinberg School, said that hypnotherapy holds the potential of providing relief to UV patients by helping them manage their stress and develop a sense of control over their health.

Keefer presented her findings at the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America’s 13th Annual Medical Symposium and 14th Annual Patient and Family Conference in Chicago.

Wednesday 26, Aug 2009

  Effective treatment of steroid-naive ulcerative colitis patients

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Effective treatment of steroid-naive ulcerative colitis patientsAccording to a research article published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology, the therapeutic utility of LCAP (Leukocytapheresis) for steroid-naïve patient with UC was investigated by Dr. Masatoshi Kudo from Kinki University School of Medicine of Japan. Kudo remarked that the efficacy of LCAP can be forecasted on the assumption of endoscopic findings.

It was found that steroid administration can lead to varying side effects despite the fact that it is considered as a second-line therapy for the induction of remission in ulcerative colitis (UC), if remissions are not attainable by salazosulfapyridine or mesalazine treatment.

From Eurekalert.org:

In 1995, LCAP was introduced for patients with UC. LCAP is a method where the blood is passed though a leukocyte removal filter before being returned to the body. On average, 1.6 × 1010 leukocytes are removed during one session. These leukocytes include granulocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes. Almost 100% of granulocytes and monocytes and 60% of lymphocytes are removed by removal filter. In this study, we found 61.1% of steroid-naive UC patients (11/18) had entered remission eight weeks after the last LCAP session.

Since steroids can induce remission in 45% to 90% of salazosulfapyridine or mesalazine non-responders, it appears that LCAP is as efficacious as steroids as a second-line treatment. Analysis of the endoscopic findings of the patients revealed that while the remission rate of the patients with erosion was extremely high after LCAP; however, that of the patients with geographic ulcers and deep ulcers extremely low. None of the patients experienced any severe adverse effects from LCAP. Given the low rate of adverse events suffered by patients treated with LCAP, we propose that patients with moderately active UC should be treated with LCAP before steroids are considered.

It can thus be concluded that LCAP may prove to be an effective and safe treatment option for steroid-naive UC patients with moderate activity. In addition to that, endoscopic findings are beneficial for predicting the treatment efficacy.

Tuesday 28, Jul 2009

  Treating Ulcerative Colitis patients

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Treating Ulcerative Colitis patientsUlcerative colitis patients are primarily treated with salazosulfapyridine or mesalazine treatment. Steroids act as a second line therapy for the induction until remission in ulcerative colitis if the first line of treatment fails. However, steroids use can have its side effects.

A research was conducted in Japan by Dr. Masatoshi Kudo from Kinki University School of Medicine. They investigated an alternative treatment for steroid-naive patients with ulcerative colitis. LCAP or leukocytapharesis is a method where the blood is passed through a filter to remove leukocytes before finally returning it inside the body. LCAP was introduced to patients in 1995. Furthermore, they assessed whether the efficacy of LCAP can be predicted on the basis of endoscopic findings.

Results of the study showed that on average, 1.6 x 1010 leukocytes are removed during one session. It included granulocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes. Eleven out of eighteen patients with ulcerative colitis or approximately 61% had entered remission eight weeks after LCAP treatment. Steroids on the other hand can induce remission in 45% to 90% of patients who are non-responsive to salazosulfapyridine or mesalazine treatment. None of the patients treated with LCAP experienced any severe adverse effects from the treatment.

They concluded that LCAP is as efficacious as steroids as a second line of treatment. Patients with moderately active colitis should be treated with LCAP before steroids are considered due to its low incidence of adverse effects.

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