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Monday 19, Oct 2015

  USA Cycling To Ban People With Doping History To Work

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USA Cycling will very soon enact a formal zero-tolerance doping policy for its contractors and employees to draw a line the stand by defining who all can and cannot work at the US governing body of cycling.

The policy is likely to be enacted within weeks and still under evaluation by internal counsel. This policy will be roughly structured into two branches, each defined by the individuals it will prohibit from working at or with USA Cycling. The first section of the policy states that any employee or contractor with a proven doping past will not be hired to work directly with athletes. In other words, any coach, trainer or doctor must have a clean record under the new policy.

Derek Bouchard-Hall, USA Cycling’s new CEO, defined “proven doping past” as having been sanctioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency or the United States Anti-Doping Agency. Bouchard-Hall added this has already been done informally, but we’re putting into a formal policy and also commented that we are not in the business of evaluating rumor and innuendo but with a proven doping past, you will not work at USA Cycling with athletes.

The second section of the policy states that USA Cycling will not hire any employee or contractor (who has a proven connection to doping from “this point forward“), whether he or she works directly with athletes or not. In other words, f a rider or coach or doctor is found guilty from October 2015 onward, he or she cannot work at USA Cycling in any capacity. USA Cycling, to augment this new policy, will be asking new employees to sign a statement when they are hired that will verify they have never been involved in doping in any way. If an employee is proven to be involved in doping after hiring, he or she will be terminated.

Bouchard-Hall added USA Cycling would also want current employees to sign such a statement. He also remarked we are seeking to do that with all employees, including those that are here today and added but that’s a legal nuance we need to work out, whether we can do that or not. Previously, Bouchard-Hall described the new, tougher stance of the organization on dopers in broad terms to express the requirement for evaluating the context of doping offenses before meting out punishment. Bouchard-Hall

Bouchard-Hall said athletes should learn that doping can have professional ramifications well after their riding career is over. He also commented that it is not at all about vengeance but this is about stopping doping in the future. The USA Cycling’s new CEO also said the policies that we’re making are not about putting further penalties on those in the past, it’s about how we stop doping going forward. Bouchard-Hall also clarified that his recent statement that there will be no coaches working with our athletes or directly with athletes who have a doping past was not understood rightly. He said the policy does not apply beyond USA Cycling employees and into American-registered teams and riders.

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Thursday 30, Oct 2014

  Armstrong Banned From Riding George Hincapie Gran Fondo

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Armstrong Banned From Riding George Hincapie Gran Fondo

According to a statement by USA Cycling, disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong has been barred from participating in the non-competitive Gran Fondo Hincapie as it comes under the umbrella of USA Cycling.

The Gran Fondo Hincapie, which is named after George Hincapie, is a 128 km touring trek set for this weekend around Greenville.

USA Cycling spokesman Bill Kellick said USA Cycling has informed USADA that the Hincapie Gran Fondo constitutes a cycling ‘activity’ that is ‘authorized’ by USA Cycling as those terms are used in the World Anti-Doping Code and in the Anti-Doping provisions of the UCI (International Cycling Union) Cycling Regulations and added under these provisions, an athlete’s suspension bars participation in an authorized activity such as this. Kellick added the UCI has confirmed USA Cycling’s interpretation and added that the World Anti-Doping Code vests jurisdiction in UCI and in USADA to determine whether an athlete has violated the terms of any suspension, as well as to assess any sanctions that might accompany an adverse determination. The USA Cycling spokesman said USA Cycling was asked by the US Anti-Doping Agency to look into the matter after it learned that Lance Armstrong was planning to ride and reunite with several of his teammates, including George Hincapie.

A number of current professionals competing in the race, including Larry Warbasse expressed disappointment with the statement of USA Cycling. Warbasse said he doesn’t think Armstrong is the evil guy he has been depicted to be, in all these books and movies, but he supposes that is ultimately going to be left up for people to decide for themselves. Warbasse said Lance took the brunt of the USADA investigation, much harder than anyone else and in his opinion, and he might deserve a bit of a break.

Hincapie said the Fondo is not supposed to have an intended or implied message; at least that’s not what we are shooting for. The former cyclist said it is just a celebration of cycling with friends and fans that also support what we feel are important causes. The former teammate of Armstrong said he knows he had made mistakes along with some of the other riders in attendance, but he believes in, and hope for, second chances for everyone and added he is very fortunate to count many former and current professionals as friends, and will leave it to his peers to decide how they regard me, and the event.

In 2013, Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles for doping. He was handed out a life ban from the sport and admitted that all his seven consecutive Tour de France wins were fuelled by performance-enhancing drugs. During a television interview broadcast with American talk show host Oprah Winfrey in January 2013, Armstrong admitted to using substances like Testosterone, EPO, Human growth hormone, and other drugs for dominating international cycling. The Texan also admitted that he bullied others who accused him of being a cheat and repeatedly denied he ever used banned performance enhancing drugs.

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Tuesday 28, Oct 2014

  Armstrong Had Prior Authorization To Ride Fondo, Says Hincapie

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Armstrong Had Prior Authorization To Ride Fondo, Says Hincapie

George Hincapie, American retired road bicycle racer, has remarked that his former teammate Lance Armstrong had prior authorization from “the appropriate governing body” to ride in the Gran Fondo Hincapie in Greensville, South Carolina.

Lance Armstrong was to reunite with several former U.S. Postal Service teammates, including George Hincapie, Christian Vande Velde, and Kevin Livingston. He was also to reunite with other  active American professional riders including Tejay van Garderen, Brent Bookwalter, and Larry Warbasse (BMC Racing), Tom Danielson and Alex Howes (Garmin-Sharp), and Matthew Busche (Trek Factory Racing).

The planned attendance of Armstrong drew the attention of the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) and USA Cycling because of his lifetime ban. In a statement, USA Cycling said that the banned cyclist is prohibited from participating from any event sanctioned by the national federation according to WADA Code. The Hincapie Fondo, as a non-competitive event, was in no way required to be sanctioned through USA Cycling.

USA Cycling’s director of communications, Bill Kellick, said no one here gave him a green light to participate and said we had no prior knowledge. The Hincapie Fondo is listed by USA Cycling as a “Fun Ride or Tour” and not a competitive event. USA Cycling director of communications Bill Kellick had remarked the event is a permitted, non-competitive ride with no officials, so there is no one there to stop Armstrong from participating but he added that if he does participate, it would be up to USADA to determine what, if any, penalties would be imposed beyond the lifetime ban and then it would be up to USA Cycling to impose those penalties.

In 2012, Hincapie testified against Lance Armstrong before USADA that he and Lance made use of banned performance enhancing drugs but mentioned in his sworn affidavit that he continues to hold Lance Armstrong in “high regard.” Hincapie had remarked he continues to regard Lance Armstrong as a great cyclist, and he continues to be proud to be his friend and to have raced with him for many years. The former cyclist had remarked he does not condemn Lance for making those choices, and he does not wish to be condemned for the choices he made.

On hearing this, George Hincapie remarked issued a statement and expressed his disappointment and said Lance Armstrong had been given “the green light” to participate after someone from the Hincapie Fondo had reached out to “the appropriate governing body.” However, Hincapie did not specify which “appropriate governing body” had been contacted. In the statement, George Hincapie said Lance will not be joining us at the Fondo this year and added that more than a month ago we conferred with what we thought was the appropriate governing body regarding his participation. Hincapie said at that time we were given the green light for him to ride and our intent was never to cause a stir, but we are disappointed to learn they’ve reversed course at the eleventh hour and added we will of course comply with the ruling, and look forward to a great event.

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Sunday 10, Feb 2013

  Lance Armstrong May Help USADA

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Lance Armstrong May Help USADA

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency says it has been in contact with disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong and offering him more time to decide if he wants to cooperate with the investigators and tell more about doping in cycling.

In a statement, USADA chief executive Travis Tygart said in a statement his group was “in communication” with Armstrong and his representatives and USADA understand that he does want to be part of the solution and assist in the effort to clean up the sport of cycling and must cooperate with its cleanup effort if his ban is to be reduced.

It was recently reported that the cyclist, who has been barred from Olympic sports for life, is in talks with USADA to possibly disclose who helped him dope and how he managed to cover up his doping for nearly a decade. Armstrong, according to sources, has expressed his desire to reveal those details to have his competition ban reduced to eight years. After the USADA deadline to reduce the ban got over, a two-week extension was given to him to come out all clean.

The goal of Lance Armstrong to come open and fully with information about his doping is to compete in triathlons and running events as most of these events are sanctioned by organizations that follow the World Anti-Doping Code, under which the disgraced cyclist is serving his lifetime ban. His ban could be reduced to eight years if he helps anti-doping officials to build cases against others under the current rules. His ban may further be reduced if Armstrong decides to offer incriminating information about sporting officials, including those at the International Cycling Union or USA Cycling but an exception to the rule would be required to be made by anti-doping and cycling officials in such a case.

Meanwhile, the banned cyclist has been sued over $12 million in Tour de France prize money after he admitted to using banned performance enhancing drugs throughout his career and to win seven consecutive Tour de France titles. In a suit filed in Texas state court in Dallas, SCA Promotions Inc alleges Armstrong and his management company, Tailwind Sports, defrauded it into paying Armstrong $12.1 million in bonuses and interest for his 2002, 2003 and 2004 Tour de France wins by lying about the use of banned drugs by Lance Armstrong during those events. SCA Chief Executive Officer Robert Hamman said in a statement Armstrong cheated to win all of his Tour de France victories and we paid $12,120,000 to Tailwind Sports Inc as a result of Lance Armstrong’s unjustly achieved victories and related activities. He also added that SCA also suffered reputational damage and substantial loss of business. Armstrong attorney Mark Fabiani remarked that the agreement’s “plain words bars SCA from ever revisiting the settlement it entered into in 2006.”

In the recent past, two California men sued Lance Armstrong and his book publishers last month for fraud and false advertising and claimed his best-selling memoirs, billed as non-fiction, were revealed to be filled with lies after his confession to systematic doping.

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Monday 05, Nov 2012

  UCI Sued By Sponsor For £1.25m

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UCI Sued By Sponsor For £1.25m

Australian clothing firm SKINS has threatened to sue the governing body of cycling, UCI, for its failure to crack down on doping and run a clean sport.

The Australian company’s Swiss lawyers wrote to UCI saying the company had been involved in professional cycling since 2008 in the belief that the sport had cleaned up its act after the 1998 Tour de France that was hit by scandals. In a statement issued through its lawyers, the company said it concluded that it must revise that view. The statement reads SKINS, as a supplier and sponsor, is particularly concerned with its brand image and is firmly against doping as it strongly believes in the true spirit of competition.

The company said it had acted accordingly after the Lance Armstrong scandal, which saw the Texan stripped of his seven Tour de France titles after a USADA investigation into alleged systematic doping. It was indicated by the firm that the manner in which the governing body of cycling dealt with the case of the disgraced cyclist and its fight against doping in general is the primary reason for the total loss of confidence in professional cycling by the public and added that this loss of credibility and confidence for cycling “harms SKINS, as well as any other sponsor or supplier.”

The company sponsors Cycling Australia, USA Cycling, the Rabobank, Europcar and Telekom teams and BikeNZ in New Zealand, among others.

Meanwhile, a giant effigy of Lance Armstrong went up in flames recently as part of one of the biggest bonfire parties in the UK. The cyclist, accused by the USADA of using and promoting the use of performance enhancing drugs, was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life, pipped the likes of Jimmy Savile and Chancellor George Osborne after suggestions from members of the public. The effigy came complete with a ‘Jim Fixed It For Me’ medallion and a sign which read ‘For sale, Racing bike no longer required’.

In another development, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has applauded the USADA for its case against the disgraced cyclist who was accused by some of his former teammates of using and encouraging the use of performance enhancing drugs within the USPS team. WADA recently said that it would not appeal against the sanctions imposed by the USADA on Armstrong and said WADA has no concerns as to the complete process and the overwhelming weight of evidence against the cyclist. USADA accused the Texan rider of spearheading “the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen”.

The seven-time champion of Tour de France was accused by teammates including Frankie Andreu, George Hincapie, Floyd Landis, and Tyler Hamilton of using EPO, growth hormone, and other performance enhancing drugs. The veteran American cyclist who raced alongside Lance Armstrong during all of his seven Tour de France victories, Hincapie, said he made use of banned substances during his professional career and remarked he is looking forward to play a substantial role to develop, encourage, and help young riders to compete and win with the best in the world.

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Sunday 28, Oct 2012

  US Cycling Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Us cycling athlete accepts sanction

Roger Hernandez, of Miami, Fla., an athlete in the sport of cycling, has accepted a two-year suspension for an anti-doping rule violation, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The violation was based on a refusal by Hernandez to submit to a sample collection. The 45-year-old Hernandez refused to take part in an In-Competition doping control test on July 29, 2011 at the Masters Track Nationals in Trexlertown. The refusal of an athlete to provide a sample when notified that he has been selected for doping control constitutes a rule violation under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Cycling Union (UCI) Anti-Doping Rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

A two- year period of ineligibility was accepted by Hernandez that began on August 21, 2011 the day after he last competed. The cycling athlete is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to July 29, 2011, the date upon which he refused to submit to sample collection, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the sanction.

Roger Hernandez is a body builder and a cycling champion with numerous titles. The athlete finished second in the keirin state final, won a world masters title in 2003, and headed to Portugal with intent on winning again. During day 4 of the USA Cycling Masters Track Nationals in Trexlertown, PA (July 29, 2011), Roger Hernandez of the Nitroshot cycling team came third behind Todd Hayes and Kirk Whiteman with a time of 11.607.

After the suspension of Hernandez, USA Cycling adjusted results from the 2011 Masters Track National Championships. Michael Miller of Morgantown, Pa., also accepted a suspension for anti-doping violation. The 42-year-old Miller tested positive for methylhexaneamine, a stimulant, as a result of a sample collected at the Masters Track Nationals, on July 27, 2011, in Trexlertown and accepted an eight-month period of ineligibility, which began on September 2, 2011, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. Methylhexaneamine is classified as a Specified Substance, and therefore the presence of that substance in an athlete’s sample can result in a reduced sanction. Miller is also disqualified from all results obtained during the Masters Track Nationals, which began on July 26, 2011, as well as any other competitive results obtained subsequent to July 26, 2011, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes.

The game of cycling is noticing some bad examples for the game in the last few months. A few months back, seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong was stripped of all his titles and banned for life by the United States Anti-doping Agency. This was after the cyclist was accused by former teammates of using anabolic steroids, human growth hormone, EPO, cortisone, and other performance enhancing drugs during an illustrious career with the USPS cycling team. Floyd Landis, Taylor Hamilton, and Frankie Andreu said every one in the team knew that he was using performance enhancing drugs and Armstrong even once claimed that the UCI, governing body of cycling, has swept his positive test.

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Monday 08, Oct 2012

  US Cycling Athlete Accepts Sanction

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US Cycling Athlete Accepts Sanction

Nick Brandt-Sorenson of Los Angeles, a masters rider who also competed in Category 1 races, has been suspended by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 32-year-old Sorenson accepted a two-year suspension for an anti-doping rule violation after testing positive for Efaproxiral that artificially enhances oxygen delivery to the tissues. The drug prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Cycling Union (UCI) Anti-Doping Rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

The two-year period of ineligibility of Brandt-Sorenson began on September 4, 2011, the day his sample was collected. The cyclist is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on or subsequent to August 31, 2011, the date the Masters Road Nationals event began, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of this sanction. A sample provided by Brandt-Sorenson that was collected at the Masters Road Nationals in Bend, Oregon tested positive for the drug.

After the sanction, several Oregon riders move up a spot on the five-rider podiums for the 2011 Masters Road National Championships. Portland’s Stephen Bedford climbed from fifth to the fourth spot in the Masters 30-34 Criterium and Galen Mitterman of Milwaukie and Scott Gray of Bend each moved up a spot in Masters 30-34 road race to fourth and fifth, respectively.

The 2011 national road champion for men 30-34, Nicholas Brandt-Sorensen (Velosport) said he regrets to inform that he has accepted a provisional suspension from USADA for a medical control sample taken after USA Cycling Masters National Road Race and added that his Urine Sample A showed a trace amount of a prohibited substance, which is on the WADA list of banned substances for 2011.

Brandt added that he takes the full responsibility for anything ingested by him, knowingly or unknowingly and rendered an apology to this team, the sport of cycling, and fans.

Brandt-Sorensen’s Velosport team soon announced that the cyclist has been suspended. A statement from the team said Velosport supports clean cycling and would enforce a zero-tolerance policy with regards to doping in sport and added that the team, management, and club sponsors wholeheartedly support the efforts of the USADA and its affiliated organizations. The team will immediately sever all ties with any member, sponsor, or supporter who is found to be engaging in the use of any prohibited substances or prohibited methods pursuant to the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing, the International Cycling Union (UCI), or World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) rules.

With the sanction, Brandt-Sorensen becomes the second consecutive men’s 30-34 road champion to lose his title to a doping suspension. In 2010, Andrew Crater vacated his championship after he tested positive for marijuana metabolites. Eric Marcotte (SKLZ-Pista Palace) who was runner-up to Brandt-Sorensen in the nationals road race in Bend, Oregon inherit the title.

Recently, Roger Hernandez accepted a two-year suspension on October 6 after he refused a test at masters track nationals in July. The sanction of Sorenson follows on the footsteps of Southern California’s Josh Webster who was sanctioned on July 15, 2011 for a period of two years after he tested positive for Methylhexaneamine and Phenpromethamine at the Tulsa Tough in June and accepted a two-year sanction in July.

US Cycling Athlete Accepts Sanction

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